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Journal ArticleDOI

Isolation and characterization of a monoaromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa from crude oil.

TL;DR: The results presented here highlight the metabolic versatility and hydrocarbon biodegradative capability of strain PTz-5, signifying its great potential for the bioremediation of various hydrocarbon-contaminated environments.
Abstract: The present study reports on the isolation and characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PTz-5 from crude oil from oil field sampled in Assam, India. It was capable to utilize hexadecane, benzene or toluene as a sole source of carbon aerobically. Strain PTz-5 was able to produce extracellular lipase that catalyzed triglycerides to free fatty acid and glycerol. The lipase activity was stable in the temperature range of 40 to 60°C. Strain PTz-5 avidly adhered to the surface of hydrocarbon droplets during their growth in liquid culture medium. These properties could play an essential role in hydrocarbon degradation. The results presented here highlight the metabolic versatility and hydrocarbon biodegradative capability of strain PTz-5, signifying its great potential for the bioremediation of various hydrocarbon-contaminated environments.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An overview of the recent literature referring to the usage of bacteria as biodegraders is provided, barriers regarding the implementation of this microbial technology are discussed, and suggestions for further developments are provided.
Abstract: With the sharp increase in population and modernization of society, environmental pollution resulting from petroleum hydrocarbons has increased, resulting in an urgent need for remediation. Petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are ubiquitous in nature and can utilize these compounds as sources of carbon and energy. Bacteria displaying such capabilities are often exploited for the bioremediation of petroleum oil-contaminated environments. Recently, microbial remediation technology has developed rapidly and achieved major gains. However, this technology is not omnipotent. It is affected by many environmental factors that hinder its practical application, limiting the large-scale application of the technology. This paper provides an overview of the recent literature referring to the usage of bacteria as biodegraders, discusses barriers regarding the implementation of this microbial technology, and provides suggestions for further developments.

357 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is suggested that simultaneous analysis of DNA extracted from both aqueous and oil phases can facilitate a better understanding of the bacterial communities in water-flooded petroleum reservoirs.
Abstract: Bacterial communities in both aqueous and oil phases of water-flooded petroleum reservoirs were characterized by molecular analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes obtained from Shengli Oil Field using DNA pyrosequencing and gene clone library approaches. Metagenomic DNA was extracted from the aqueous and oil phases and subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification with primers targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The analysis by these two methods showed that there was a large difference in bacterial diversity between the aqueous and oil phases of the reservoir fluids, especially in the reservoirs with lower water cut. At a high phylogenetic level, the predominant bacteria detected by these two approaches were identical. However, pyrosequencing allowed the detection of more rare bacterial species than the clone library method. Statistical analysis showed that the diversity of the bacterial community of the aqueous phase was lower than that of the oil phase. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the vast majority of sequences detected in the water phase were from members of the genus Arcobacter within the Epsilonproteobacteria, which is capable of degrading the intermediates of hydrocarbon degradation such as acetate. The oil phase of reservoir fluid samples was dominated by members of the genus Pseudomonas within the Gammaproteobacteria and the genus Sphingomonas within the Alphaproteobacteria, which have the ability to degrade crude oil through adherence to hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions. In addition, many anaerobes that could degrade the component of crude oil were also found in the oil phase of reservoir fluids, mainly in the reservoir with lower water cut. These were represented by Desulfovibrio spp., Thermodesulfovibrio spp., Thermodesulforhabdus spp., Thermotoga spp., and Thermoanaerobacterium spp. This research suggested that simultaneous analysis of DNA extracted from both aqueous and oil phases can facilitate a better understanding of the bacterial communities in water-flooded petroleum reservoirs.

74 citations


Cites background from "Isolation and characterization of a..."

  • ...Although they were not believed to originate from oil reservoirs, their ability to degrade components of crude oil with oxygen addition should not be neglected (Obuekwe et al. 2008; Singleton et al. 2009; Mukherjee et al. 2010; Abbasnezhad et al. 2011)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study developed a DNA diagnostic method that reduces the time to select contaminated sites that are good candidates for bioremediation and applied an oligonucleotide microarray method to detect and monitor genes that lead to aliphatic and aromatic degradation.

65 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a synthesis on critical analysis of the bacterial and archaeal composition and diversity in oil reservoir systems for a more comprehensive understanding of microbiota and their affiliation to specific oil reservoir conditions, including temperature, salinity and production practices.

56 citations

References
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Book
15 Jan 2001
TL;DR: Molecular Cloning has served as the foundation of technical expertise in labs worldwide for 30 years as mentioned in this paper and has been so popular, or so influential, that no other manual has been more widely used and influential.
Abstract: Molecular Cloning has served as the foundation of technical expertise in labs worldwide for 30 years. No other manual has been so popular, or so influential. Molecular Cloning, Fourth Edition, by the celebrated founding author Joe Sambrook and new co-author, the distinguished HHMI investigator Michael Green, preserves the highly praised detail and clarity of previous editions and includes specific chapters and protocols commissioned for the book from expert practitioners at Yale, U Mass, Rockefeller University, Texas Tech, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Washington University, and other leading institutions. The theoretical and historical underpinnings of techniques are prominent features of the presentation throughout, information that does much to help trouble-shoot experimental problems. For the fourth edition of this classic work, the content has been entirely recast to include nucleic-acid based methods selected as the most widely used and valuable in molecular and cellular biology laboratories. Core chapters from the third edition have been revised to feature current strategies and approaches to the preparation and cloning of nucleic acids, gene transfer, and expression analysis. They are augmented by 12 new chapters which show how DNA, RNA, and proteins should be prepared, evaluated, and manipulated, and how data generation and analysis can be handled. The new content includes methods for studying interactions between cellular components, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing technologies, RNA interference, and epigenetic analysis using DNA methylation techniques and chromatin immunoprecipitation. To make sense of the wealth of data produced by these techniques, a bioinformatics chapter describes the use of analytical tools for comparing sequences of genes and proteins and identifying common expression patterns among sets of genes. Building on thirty years of trust, reliability, and authority, the fourth edition of Mol

215,169 citations

Book
01 Jan 1963
TL;DR: Methods of enzymatic analysis, Methods of enzymes analysis, the authors, Methods of enzyme analysis, enzymatics, methods of enzymes, and methods of analysis, method of enzymes.
Abstract: Methods of enzymatic analysis , Methods of enzymatic analysis , مرکز فناوری اطلاعات و اطلاع رسانی کشاورزی

18,100 citations

01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: The supplemental information presented in this document is intended for use with the antimicrobial susceptibility testing procedures published in the following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI)–approved standards.
Abstract: The supplemental information presented in this document is intended for use with the antimicrobial susceptibility testing procedures published in the following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI)–approved standards: M02-A12—Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Disk Susceptibility Tests; Approved Standard—Twelfth Edition; M07-A10—Methods for Dilution Antimicrobial Susceptibility Tests for Bacteria That Grow Aerobically; Approved Standard—Tenth Edition; and M11-A8—Methods for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Anaerobic Bacteria; Approved Standard— Eighth Edition. The standards contain information about both disk (M02) and dilution (M07 and M11) test procedures for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Clinicians depend heavily on information from the microbiology laboratory for treatment of their seriously ill patients. The clinical importance of antimicrobial susceptibility test results demands that these tests be performed under optimal conditions and that laboratories have the capability to provide results for the newest antimicrobial agents. The tabular information presented here represents the most current information for drug selection, interpretation, and QC using the procedures standardized in the most current editions of M02, M07, and M11. Users should replace the tables published earlier with these new tables. (Changes in the tables since the previous edition appear in boldface type.) Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing. 26th ed. CLSI supplement M100S (ISBN 1-56238-923-8 [Print]; ISBN 1-56238924-6 [Electronic]). Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, 950 West Valley Road, Suite 2500, Wayne, Pennsylvania 19087 USA, 2016. The data in the interpretive tables in this supplement are valid only if the methodologies in M02-A12—Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Disk Susceptibility Tests; Approved Standard—Twelfth Edition; M07-A10—Methods for Dilution Antimicrobial Susceptibility Tests for Bacteria That Grow Aerobically; Approved Standard—Tenth Edition; and M11-A8—Methods for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Anaerobic Bacteria; Approved Standard— Eighth Edition are followed.

17,824 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards continue to be based on this publication; the “Kirby-Bauer” method is, among the many disk methods used in other countries, still the one that has been researched most thoroughly and updated continuously.
Abstract: In the words of the authors, the paper by A. W. Bauer et al., from the University of Washington in Seattle, on a standardized single-disk method for antibiotic susceptibility testing “. . . consolidate(s) and update(s) previous descriptions of the method and provide(s) a concise outline for its performance and interpretation.” Clinical microbiologists were relieved that finally a disk diffusion method had been standardized, could be used with ease, and provided reliable results as compared with minimum inhibitory concentration tests. The pivotal role of Hans Ericsson’s theoretical and practical studies (H. Ericsson and G. Svartz-Malmberg, Antibiot. Chemother. 6:41–74, 1959), as well as earlier reports by some of the authors of the publications cited, must be mentioned as a matter of fairness. Most of the recommendations given are still valid today even though some of the antimicrobial agents are obsolete, new ones have been added, some zone sizes had to be modified, and new media were designed for Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards continue to be based on this publication; the “Kirby-Bauer” method is, among the many disk methods used in other countries, still the one that has been researched most thoroughly and updated continuously. ALEXANDER VON GRAEVENITZ

16,916 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Many members of the Academy of Pediatrics seem to be generally unaware of the fact that the Academy has participated for ten years in a very interesting and valuable organization, the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS).
Abstract: Many members of the Academy of Pediatrics seem to be generally unaware of the fact that your Academy has participated for ten years in a very interesting and valuable organization, the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). The NCCLS has only three kinds of members: professional organizations, industrial (clinical laboratory instruments and supplies), and government agencies (CDC, FDA, NBS, NIH). Each member is represented by one delegate and one alternate. At present there are close to 110 members, of which 20 are professional societies.

13,750 citations