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Jack London's Racial Lives: A Critical Biography

TL;DR: Racial Lives as mentioned in this paper examines race in London's life and diverse works, whether set in the Klondike, Hawaii or the South Seas or during the Russo-Japanese War, the Jack Johnson world heavyweight bouts, or the Mexican Revolution.
Abstract: This title presents the first thorough examination of race in London's life and writing.Jack London (1876-1916), known for his naturalistic and mythic tales, remains among the most popular and influential American writers in the world. Jack London's "Racial Lives" offers the first full study of the enormously important issue of race in London's life and diverse works, whether set in the Klondike, Hawaii, or the South Seas or during the Russo-Japanese War, the Jack Johnson world heavyweight bouts, or the Mexican Revolution. Reesman explores his choices of genre by analyzing racial content and purpose and judges his literary artistry against a standard of racial tolerance. Although he promoted white superiority in novels and nonfiction, London sharply satirized racism and meaningfully portrayed racial others - most often as protagonists - in his short fiction.Why the disparity? For London, racial and class identity were intertwined: his formation as an artist began with the mixed 'heritage' of his family. His mother taught him racism, but he learned something different from his African American foster mother, Virginia Prentiss. Childhood poverty, shifting racial allegiances, and a 'psychology of want' helped construct the many 'houses' of race and identity he imagined. Reesman also examines London's socialism, his study of Darwin and Jung, and the illnesses he suffered in the South Seas.With new readings of "The Call of the Wild and Martin Eden", and many other works, such as the explosive Pacific stories, Reesman reveals that London employed many of the same literary tropes of race used by African American writers of his period: the slave narrative, double-consciousness, the tragic mulatto, and ethnic diaspora. Hawaii seemed to inspire his most memorable visions of a common humanity.
Citations
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TL;DR: Morrison as mentioned in this paper argues that race has become a metaphor, a way of referring to forces, events, and forms of social decay, economic division, and human panic, and argues that individualism, masculinity, the insistence upon innocence coupled to an obsession with figurations of death and hell are responses to a dark and abiding Africanist presence.
Abstract: Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison provides a personal inquiry into the significance of African-American literary imagination. Her goal, she states at the outset, is to \"put forth an argument for extending the study of American literature\". Author of \"Beloved\", \"The Bluest Eye\", \"Song of Solomon\", and other vivid portrayals of black American experience, Morrison ponders the effect that living in a historically racialized society has had on American writing in the 19th and 20th centuries. She argues that race has become a metaphor, a way of referring to forces, events, and forms of social decay, economic division, and human panic. Her argument is that the central characteristics of American literature - individualism, masculinity, the insistence upon innocence coupled to an obsession with figurations of death and hell - are responses to a dark and abiding Africanist presence.

244 citations

Book
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: The Annotated Snark as mentioned in this paper is a collection of illustrated illustrations by Henry Holiday, including the'supressed' Boojum drawing, with an introduction, notes and bibliography.
Abstract: 'They sought it with thimbles, they sought it with care; They pursued it with forks and hope; They threatened its life with a railway share; They charmed it with smiles and soap'. Ever since Lewis Carroll's nonsense epic appeared in 1876, readers have joined his ten-man Snark-hunting crew and pursued the search with great enthusiasm. What are they hunting for? What is the Snark? Numerous theories have been proposed. Carroll himself provides a helpful preface to the poem and is recorded as having explained to one reader: 'In answer to your question, 'What did you mean the Snark was?' will you tell your friend that I meant that the Snark was a Boojum. I trust that she and you will now feel quite satisfied and happy'.This edition, previously published as "The Annotated Snark", reproduces the original illustrations by Henry Holiday, including the 'supressed' Boojum drawing. Martin Gardner provides an introduction, notes and bibliography, and an Appendix contains F. C. S. Schiller's "Commentary on the Snark" and J. A. Lyndon's "Fit the Seven-and-a-Halfth".

54 citations

Book
06 Oct 2011
TL;DR: Realist writers of the period include some of America's greatest, such as Henry James, Edith Wharton and Mark Twain, but also many lesser-known writers whose work still speaks to us today, for instance Charles Chesnutt, Zitkala-Sa and Sarah Orne Jewett as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Between the Civil War and the First World War, realism was the most prominent form of American fiction. Realist writers of the period include some of America's greatest, such as Henry James, Edith Wharton and Mark Twain, but also many lesser-known writers whose work still speaks to us today, for instance Charles Chesnutt, Zitkala-Sa and Sarah Orne Jewett. Emphasizing realism's historical context, this introduction traces the genre's relationship with powerful, often violent, social conflicts involving race, gender, class and national origin. It also examines how the realist style was created; the necessarily ambiguous relationship between realism produced on the page and reality outside the book; and the different, often contradictory, forms 'realism' took in literary works by different authors. The most accessible yet sophisticated account of American literary realism currently available, this volume will be of great value to students, teachers and readers of the American novel.

20 citations

References
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Book
14 Oct 2020
TL;DR: In this article, Fields has given us a splendid new translation of the greatest work of sociology ever written, one we will not be embarrassed to assign to our students, in addition she has written a brilliant and profound introduction.
Abstract: "Karen Fields has given us a splendid new translation of the greatest work of sociology ever written, one we will not be embarrassed to assign to our students. In addition she has written a brilliant and profound introduction. The publication of this translation is an occasion for general celebration, for a veritable 'collective effervescence.' -- Robert N. Bellah Co-author of Habits of the Heart, and editor of Emile Durkheim on Morality and Society "This superb new translation finally allows non-French speaking American readers fully to appreciate Durkheim's genius. It is a labor of love for which all scholars must be grateful." --Lewis A. Coser

5,158 citations

Book
01 Jan 1912
TL;DR: In The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (1912), Emile Durkheim set himself the task of discovering the enduring source of human social identity as discussed by the authors, and investigated what he considered to be the simplest form of documented religion - totemism among the Aborigines of Australia.
Abstract: 'If religion generated everything that is essential in society, this is because the idea of society is the soul of religion.' In The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (1912), Emile Durkheim set himself the task of discovering the enduring source of human social identity. He investigated what he considered to be the simplest form of documented religion - totemism among the Aborigines of Australia. Aboriginal religion was an avenue 'to yield an understanding of the religious nature of man, by showing us an essential and permanent aspect of humanity'. The need and capacity of men and women to relate socially lies at the heart of Durkheim's exploration, in which religion embodies the beliefs that shape our moral universe. The Elementary Forms has been applauded and debated by sociologists, anthropologists, ethnographers, philosophers, and theologians, and continues to speak to new generations about the origin and nature of religion and society. This new, lightly abridged edition provides an excellent introduction to Durkheim's ideas. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

3,390 citations

Book
01 Jul 1993
TL;DR: Morrison as discussed by the authors argues that race has become a metaphor, a way of referring to forces, events, and forms of social decay, economic division, and human panic, and argues that individualism, masculinity, the insistence upon innocence coupled to an obsession with figurations of death and hell are responses to a dark and abiding Africanist presence.
Abstract: Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison provides a personal inquiry into the significance of African-American literary imagination. Her goal, she states at the outset, is to "put forth an argument for extending the study of American literature". Author of "Beloved", "The Bluest Eye", "Song of Solomon", and other vivid portrayals of black American experience, Morrison ponders the effect that living in a historically racialized society has had on American writing in the 19th and 20th centuries. She argues that race has become a metaphor, a way of referring to forces, events, and forms of social decay, economic division, and human panic. Her argument is that the central characteristics of American literature - individualism, masculinity, the insistence upon innocence coupled to an obsession with figurations of death and hell - are responses to a dark and abiding Africanist presence.

2,660 citations

Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: The 20th-anniversary edition of "The Blackening of America: Popular Culture and National Cultures" by Greil Marcus as mentioned in this paper was the first publication of the book.
Abstract: Preface to the 20th-Anniversary Edition by Greil Marcus Introduction Part I 1. Blackface and Blackness: The Minstrel Show in American Culture 2. Love and Theft: "Racial" Production and the Social Unconscious of Blackface 3. White Kids and No Kids At All: Working Class Culture and Languages of Race 4. The Blackening of America: Popular Culture and National Cultures Part II 5. "The Seeming Counterfeit": Early Blackface Acts, the Body, and Social Contradiction 6. "Genuine Negro Fun": Racial Pleasure and Class Formation in the 1840's 7. California Gold and European Revolution: Stephen Foster and the American 1848 8. Uncle Tomitudes: Racial Melodrama and Modes of Production Afterword to the 20th-Anniversary Edition by the Author Notes Bibliography Index

879 citations