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Journal ArticleDOI

Jerusalem Mamluk Regional Building Style as Demonstrated at Maqām al-Nabī Mūsā

07 Oct 2020-Der Islam (De Gruyter)-Vol. 97, Iss: 2, pp 421-455
TL;DR: The earliest products of those donations, still identifiable on the ground, are the mausoleum built by the order of Sultan Baybars (r. 1260-1277) in the early days of the Mamluk era and the manara (minaret) and the riwāq (open arcade) added by the Order of Sultan al-Ashraf Qytbāy (r 1468-1496) toward the end of that era as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Abstract Maqām al-Nabī Mūsā, situated just off the route connecting Jerusalem to Jericho and to Amman further to the east, was a meeting place for thousands of pilgrims that gathered around the shrine during the mawsim (festival). Sultans, clerks, muftis, and wealthy families, who sought the saint’s blessing, put efforts into building facilities for those pilgrims. The earliest products of those donations, still identifiable on the ground, are the mausoleum built by the order of Sultan Baybars (r. 1260–1277) in the early days of the Mamluk era and the manāra (minaret) and the riwāq (open arcade) added by the order of Sultan al-Ashraf Qāytbāy (r. 1468–1496) toward the end of that era. Both building phases bear the imprint of local masons who were active in building Mamluk Jerusalem. Those masons developed their own regional style that differed from that of their counterparts in major Mamluk centers like Damascus and Cairo. A concomitant theme in this article is thus regional styles in architecture.
Citations
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Book
01 Jan 1952

71 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, the inscriptions of Baybars dans le Bilād al-Ṣām were described as an expression de la légitimité du pouvoir.
Abstract: a Iranica Revue bibliographique pour le domaine irano-aryen Volume 29 | 2008 Comptes rendus des publications de 2006 « Les inscriptions de Baybars dans le Bilād al-Ṣām. Une expression de la légitimité du pouvoir ». Studia Islamica, vol. 97, 2003 [paru en 2006], pp. 57-85.

5 citations

DOI
01 Jan 2001
Abstract: To date scholars have established that the early Mamluk sultans legitimized their rule through the conscious use of Islamic themes. As yet however, one crucial issue that has not been routinely addressed, but should be, is audience. Much of the scholarship on Mamluk legitimacy assumes that this legitimacy was asserted in relation to an internal audience, by which is meant either the military elite, the non-military populace, or both. But Mamluk legitimacy must also be examined in light of various external audiences. The most significant of these, and the one discussed here, was those Mongol sovereigns with whom the Mamluks were in the closest contact, namely, the rulers of the Golden Horde and the Ilkhanids. Mamluk assertions of legitimacy can be detected in the diplomatic letters and embassies Baybars and Qala≠wu≠n exchanged with each Mongol power. Furthermore, although scholars have already discussed the Islamic foundation

5 citations

Book
29 Nov 2017
TL;DR: Petersen et al. as mentioned in this paper explored the place of Muslim shrines in Palestine's history and landscape, focusing on providing an architectural survey of shrines with brief forays into understanding their relevance to contemporary political issues.
Abstract: Andrew Petersen, professor of Islamic archaeology at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, has conducted extensive research on the topic of Islamic architecture in Palestine and the larger eastern Mediterranean region. In this current study, he explores the place of Muslim shrines in Palestine’s history and landscape. He largely concentrates on providing an architectural survey of shrines with brief forays into understanding their relevance to contemporary political issues. Petersen, though, is most skilled at exploring how shrines originated and tracking their architectural development over the centuries. Based largely on the author’s previous works and existing scholarship, Bones of Contention is a concise and useful introduction to a topic that stretches from the pre-Islamic period to the present and catalogs a diverse range of religious structures. As the author explains, even though the major Islamic shrines in Jerusalem and Hebron receive a great deal of attention, many others are understudied. These range from large complexes, endowed by wealthy donors, which could accommodate hundreds of visitors to humble edifices that may or may not include a tomb. Although Muslim scholars have cautioned against the ritual visitation of tombs, shrines proliferated after Muslim armies expelled the Crusaders in the twelfth century. This trend coincided with the spread of Sufism, as leaders of mystical orders established their tombs in lodges they had founded; over time their pupils and the larger public came to venerate these tombs. In chapter 2, Petersen draws on translated texts of prominent Muslim travelers and scholars (alNabulsi and al-Harawi, for example) to explore Muslim writing on the topic; this is, however, a limited representation of a much wider body of literature. He then outlines how European travelers to Palestine were initially interested in Muslim shrines only for what they revealed about their biblical origins or ancient practices. Only in the early twentieth century did scholars (for instance, Tawfik Canaan and Paul Kahle) begin to take interest in the rituals worshippers conducted at shrines. The true strength of this book is in part 2 where the author discusses the development of shrines over centuries. He examines shrines various Muslim rulers sponsored and documents closely the

4 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1952

71 citations

Book
01 Jul 2007
TL;DR: A complete Corpus of all the church buildings that were built, rebuilt or simply in use in the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem between the capture of Jerusalem by the First Crusade in 1099 and the loss of Acre in 1291 is presented in this article.
Abstract: This is the third in a series of four volumes that are intended to present a complete Corpus of all the church buildings that were built, rebuilt or simply in use in the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem between the capture of Jerusalem by the First Crusade in 1099 and the loss of Acre in 1291. This volume deals exclusively with Jerusalem, the capital of the Kingdom from 1099 to 1187. It contains descriptions and discussion of some 90 churches and chapels, accompanied by plans, elevation drawings and photographs.

40 citations


"Jerusalem Mamluk Regional Building ..." refers background in this paper

  • ...See Pringle 2007, 132‒137; Hawari 2007, 74–84; 171‒177....

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  • ...8 Burgoyne 1987, 204; Pringle 2007, 132–137 Maqām al-Nabī Mūsā9 or Goliath in Qubbat al-Naṣr at ʿAyn Jālūt.10 It has been suggested that he sought to appear as the “ideal Islamic king,ˮ as the Alexander of his time, Iskandar al-zamān.11 Baybars actions were part of the Islamization of Palestine and…...

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the relationship between Jerusalem and the monde islamique: des affinites religieuses avec la Mecque, Medine, par exemple, mais aussi politiques et administratives avec l'Egypte et la Syrie.
Abstract: Longtemps reconnue comme source pour l'histoire de Jerusalem au Moyen Age, l'oeuvre al-Uns al-Jalīl bi-Tārikh al-Quds wal-Kalīl de Mujīr al-Dīn al-Ulaymī (928/1522) est analysee ici pour sa conception de la ville par les musulmans a la fin du XV e siecle. Bien que Mujīr al-Dīn associe Jerusalem et Hebron comme les sites les plus sacres de la Terre sainte, il centre son interet sur Jerusalem, sur ses valeurs religieuses pour les musulmans heritiers des traditions monotheistes, ses lieux sacres et sa topographie, son histoire, les biographies de ses notables. L'auteur etablit des elements d'unite en creant des liens entre Jerusalem et le monde islamique : des affinites religieuses avec la Mecque, Medine, par exemple, mais aussi politiques et administratives avec l'Egypte et la Syrie

28 citations

Book
01 Sep 1993

17 citations


"Jerusalem Mamluk Regional Building ..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...The sultan used to visit his projects when under construction, see Petry 1993, 80; Little 2004, 148–149....

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