scispace - formally typeset
Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/01436597.2020.1788933

‘Just another African country’: socialism, capitalism and temporality in Mozambique

04 Mar 2021-Third World Quarterly (Informa UK Limited)-Vol. 42, Iss: 3, pp 582-598
Abstract: Here, I examine the legacies of Marx and Lenin for the Indian Ocean nation of Mozambique by tracing nation-building projects from the late colonial period to the present. By combining Archambault’s...

... read more

Topics: Socialist mode of production (62%), Temporality (52%), Capitalism (52%)
Citations
  More

12 results found



Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1017/S1537592705580149
Deborah Bräutigam1Institutions (1)
Abstract: Transforming Mozambique: The Politics of Privatization, 1975–2000. By M. Anne Pitcher. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 320p. $60.00. Mozambique provides a sharp contrast with transition in much of Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, and even Asia. A Marxist movement (Frelimo) took power in 1975, pledging to construct a socialist state. Only 15 years later, a new constitution made no reference to socialism. By 1994, Mozambique was a multiparty democracy and one of the World Bank's “model” market reformers. Yet Frelimo remains in power, presiding over the private economy it once denounced. Why and how did this happen?

... read more

Topics: Socialism (55%), Democracy (52%), Constitution (50%)

64 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1093/OXFORDJOURNALS.AFRAF.A095971
David Birmingham1Institutions (1)
01 Jan 1970-African Affairs

39 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/SCIENTIFICAMERICAN0204-32
Abstract: However, this era also allow you to get the book from many sources. The off line book store may be a common place to visit to get the book. But now, you can also find it in the on-line library. This site is one of the on-line library in which you can find your chosen one to read. Now, the presented working the system is a book that you can find here. This book tends to be the book that will give you new inspirations.

... read more

34 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.2307/2618318
Abstract: Why should wait for some days to get or receive the portugal in africa the last hundred years book that you order? Why should you take it if you can get the faster one? You can find the same book that you order right here. This is it the book that you can receive directly after purchasing. This portugal in africa the last hundred years is well known book in the world, of course many people will try to own it. Why don't you become the first? Still confused with the way?

... read more

25 Citations


References
  More

45 results found


Open accessBook
01 Jan 2000-
Abstract: "The dream of the twentieth century was the construction of mass utopia. As the century closes, this dream is being left behind; the belief that industrial modernization can bring about the good society by overcoming material scarcity for all has been challenged by the disintegration of European socialism, capitalist restructuring, and ecological constraints. The larger social vision has given way to private dreams of material happiness and to political cynicism.Developing the notion of dreamworld as both a poetic description of a collective mental state and an analytical concept, Susan Buck-Morss attempts to come to terms with mass dreamworlds at the moment of their passing. She shows how dreamworlds became dangerous when their energy was used by the structures of power as an instrument of force against the masses. " -- Publisher's Website.

... read more

Topics: Socialist mode of production (50%), Utopia (50%)

366 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.2307/525052
Abstract: This is the first history of Mozambique from the 15th century to the present. The Mozambican people have had contact with Muslim and European traders for nearly 1000 years, and their history is given a unity by the influence of commerce and seaborne trade. Indeed Mozambique itself consists of a series of ancient sea and river ports with their commercial hinterlands. Through 21 chapters the book traces two major themes: the gradual development of forms of overall political control - by the Karanga and Maravi ruling dynasties, Afro-Portuguese feudal families, the Nguni military monarchies and the chiefs and sheikhs who ran the slave trade - and the periodic crises that led to disintegration and social dislocation. Disintegration, often associated with drought and ecological disaster, led to a recurring pattern of banditry, and the breakdown of society into warring factions. Although its frontiers were drawn in 1891, Mozambique did not become a unified state till the 1930s, and many of these themes continued during the colonial era, the large concession companies taking over from Nguni and Afro-Portuguese chiefs in providing a form of feudal political control. Under the Portuguese colonial administration Mozambique provided railway and port facilities for South and Central Africa while large areas became in effect labour reserves. A thriving plantation economy also developed, the country becoming a leading producer of cash crops. An extended final chapter looks at Mozambique since independence, when the country's development fell victim to South Africa's attempts to destabilise its neighbours, and its fragile institutions were broken down once again by banditry and drought.

... read more

349 Citations



Open accessBook
01 Nov 1993-
Abstract: This is the first history of Mozambique from the 15th century to the present. The Mozambican people have had contact with Muslim and European traders for nearly 1000 years, and their history is given a unity by the influence of commerce and seaborne trade. Indeed Mozambique itself consists of a series of ancient sea and river ports with their commercial hinterlands. Through 21 chapters the book traces two major themes: the gradual development of forms of overall political control - by the Karanga and Maravi ruling dynasties, Afro-Portuguese feudal families, the Nguni military monarchies and the chiefs and sheikhs who ran the slave trade - and the periodic crises that led to disintegration and social dislocation. Disintegration, often associated with drought and ecological disaster, led to a recurring pattern of banditry, and the breakdown of society into warring factions. Although its frontiers were drawn in 1891, Mozambique did not become a unified state till the 1930s, and many of these themes continued during the colonial era, the large concession companies taking over from Nguni and Afro-Portuguese chiefs in providing a form of feudal political control. Under the Portuguese colonial administration Mozambique provided railway and port facilities for South and Central Africa while large areas became in effect labour reserves. A thriving plantation economy also developed, the country becoming a leading producer of cash crops. An extended final chapter looks at Mozambique since independence, when the country's development fell victim to South Africa's attempts to destabilise its neighbours, and its fragile institutions were broken down once again by banditry and drought.

... read more

Topics: Colonialism (51%)

313 Citations


Open accessBook
01 Jan 2008-
Abstract: Fought after a decade of armed struggle against colonialism, the Mozambican civil war lasted from 1977 to 1992, claiming hundreds of thousands of lives while displacing millions more. As conflicts across the globe span decades and generations, Stephen C. Lubkemann suggests that we need a fresh perspective on war when it becomes the context for normal life rather than an exceptional event that disrupts it. "Culture in Chaos" calls for a new point of departure in the ethnography of war that investigates how the inhabitants of war zones live under trying new conditions and how culture and social relations are transformed as a result. Lubkemann focuses on how Ndau social networks were fragmented by wartime displacement and the profound effect this had on gender relations. Demonstrating how wartime migration and post-conflict return were shaped by social struggles and interests that had little to do with the larger political reasons for the war, Lubkemann contests the assumption that wartime migration is always involuntary. His critical reexamination of displacement and his engagement with broader theories of agency and social change will be of interest to anthropologists, political scientists, historians, and demographers, and to anyone who works in a war zone or with refugees and migrants.

... read more

Topics: Social change (55%), Colonialism (52%), Politics (52%) ... read more

202 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of citations received by the Paper in previous years
YearCitations
20215
20182
20051
20041
19901
19811