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MonographDOI

Khwadāynāmag The Middle Persian Book of Kings

TL;DR: In this article, Hameen-Anttila analyzed the lost sixth-century history of the Sasanians, its lost Arabic translations, and the sources of Firdawsi's Shāhnāme.
Abstract: In Khwadāynāmag. The Middle Persian Book of Kings Jaakko Hameen-Anttila analyses the lost sixth-century historiographical work of the Sasanians, its lost Arabic translations, and the sources of Firdawsī's Shāhnāme .

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Journal ArticleDOI
14 Mar 2022-Iran
TL;DR: In this article , the theoretical requirements for choosing a king during this period of Iranian history were discussed and a discussion of the most important requirements for becoming a king was presented. But the requirements of a king were not defined in detail.
Abstract: Throughout the Sasanian history the masses as well as the dignitaries, the magi and noble families strongly believed that the king possesses certain qualities that are not to be found in other individuals. The king was, therefore, always from the Sasanian lineage and first-born princes were given preference over others. It was believed that the king must possess beauty, merit, and extraordinary bodily strength, and that he must be committed to the Zoroastrian traditions, rituals, and Iranian norms; and that his mother must be a member of the nobility as well. These qualities were the most important requirements for becoming king, and they legitimised the Sasanian king’s political power. Given the qualities of the Sasanian kings, this paper attempts to expound the theoretical requirements for choosing a king during this period of Iranian history.
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors compare the Book of Ḥamza with the Shāhnāma (Book of Kings), the two most popular works performed by the storytellers of Safavid Iran (1501-1736), focusing on their heroes.
Abstract: Abstract This paper compares the Ḥamzanāma (Book of Ḥamza) with the Shāhnāma (Book of Kings), the two most popular works performed by the storytellers of Safavid Iran (1501–1736), focusing on their heroes, Ḥamza and Rustam, respectively. Following an overview of the Ḥamzanāma that helps to identify its main intertexts, themes, and narrative elements: the Shāhnāma ; the Islamic Alexander tradition; and ʿayyārī (trickery); the paper re-examines how Ḥamza is modelled after Rustam by looking at his epithets and narrative functions. It then turns to their differences, which are most discernible in Rustam's epithet used as the name of Ḥamza's enemy, the split between the ideals of jawānmardī (generosity) and ʿayyārī , and Ḥamza's unheroic weaknesses. This latter serves to emphasize God's compassion at his martyrdom while giving storytellers an impetus to continue their performances.
References
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MonographDOI
TL;DR: Gutas as mentioned in this paper explores the major social, political and ideological factors that occasioned the unprecedented translation movement from Greek into Arabic in Baghdad, the newly founded capital of the Arab dynasty of the 'Abbasids', during the first two centuries of their rule.
Abstract: From the middle of the eighth century to the tenth century, almost all non-literary and non-historical secular Greek books, including such diverse topics as astrology, alchemy, physics, botany and medicine, that were not available throughout the eastern Byzantine Empire and the Near East, were translated into Arabic. Greek Thought, Arabic Culture explores the major social, political and ideological factors that occasioned the unprecedented translation movement from Greek into Arabic in Baghdad, the newly founded capital of the Arab dynasty of the 'Abbasids', during the first two centuries of their rule. Dimitri Gutas draws upon the preceding historical and philological scholarship in Greco-Arabic studies and the study of medieval translations of secular Greek works into Arabic and analyses the social and historical reasons for this phenomenon. Dimitri Gutas provides a stimulating, erudite and well-documented survey of this key movement in the transmission of ancient Greek culture to the Middle Ages.

565 citations

Book
01 Jan 1986
TL;DR: In this article, the Umayyad conception of the caliphate is discussed, and the title khalifat Allah is given to the prophet of the sunna, which is the basis of the prophetical sunna.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. The title khalifat Allah 3. The Umayyad conception of the caliphate 4. Caliphal law 5. From caliphal to Prophetic sunna 6. Epilogue Appendices Index.

224 citations

Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: The History attributed to Sebeos is one of the major works of early Armenian historiography as mentioned in this paper, which traces the fortunes of Armenia in the sixth and seventh centuries within the broader framework of the Byzantine-Sasanian conflict.
Abstract: The History attributed to Sebeos is one of the major works of early Armenian historiography. Although anonymous, it was written in the middle of the seventh century, a time when comparable chronicles in Greek and Syriac are sparse. Sebeos traces the fortunes of Armenia in the sixth and seventh centuries within the broader framework of the Byzantine-Sasanian conflict. Comprising two volumes, part 1 (240 pages) is the translation and notes followed by part 2 (216 pages) which contains the historical commentary, this excellent publication will be of interest to all those involved in the study of Armenia, the Caucasus, the Eastern Roman Empire and the Middle East in late antiquity. It will be of particular value to Islamicists, since Sebeos not only sets the scene for the coming of Islam, but provides the only substantial non-Muslim account of the initial period of expansion.

200 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1969

169 citations

MonographDOI
01 Jan 2006

160 citations