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MonographDOI

Khwadāynāmag The Middle Persian Book of Kings

TL;DR: In this article, Hameen-Anttila analyzed the lost sixth-century history of the Sasanians, its lost Arabic translations, and the sources of Firdawsi's Shāhnāme.
Abstract: In Khwadāynāmag. The Middle Persian Book of Kings Jaakko Hameen-Anttila analyses the lost sixth-century historiographical work of the Sasanians, its lost Arabic translations, and the sources of Firdawsī's Shāhnāme .

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Schoeler's two decade long avid exploration into the oral and written modes as mutually compatible media of transmission of knowledge (and perhaps counter-knowledge) in the early Islamic Per... as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Gregor Schoeler's two decade long avid exploration into the oral and written modes as mutually compatible media of transmission of knowledge (and perhaps counter-knowledge) in the early Islamic Per...

23 citations

01 Jan 1978
TL;DR: In this paper, a resolution du probleme souleve par les recits medievaux sur les ambitions alchimistes d'Halid ibn Yazid (mort en 704) dans le cadre de l'etude des debuts of l'hellenisation du monde islamique (avant 800).
Abstract: Resolution du probleme souleve par les recits medievaux sur les ambitions alchimistes d'Halid ibn Yazid (mort en 704) dans le cadre de l'etude des debuts de l'hellenisation du monde islamique (avant 800). La vie de Halid, ses activites politique et scientifique, ses poemes. Sources historiques et critiques des sources.

22 citations

References
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Book
05 Jul 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, a Trealise on the Principles of Shi'te Theology is presented, based on the Tracts on Listening to Music by Majd al-Din al-Tusi al-Ghazali, London Oriental Translation Fund New Series 34, 1938.
Abstract: Volume 1 1. The Algebra of Mohammed ben Musa, London, Oriental Translation Fund 19, 1831 Volume 2 2. Practical Philosophy of the Muhammadan People, from the Persian of Fakir Jany Muhammad Asaad: (with references and notes), London, Oriental Translation Fund 50, 1839 Volume 3 3. The Chronology of Ancient Nations, London, Oriental Translation Fund, 1879 Volume 4 4. Ibn al 'Arabi, Tarjuman al Ashwaq, Oriental Translation Fund New Series 20, 1911 5. al-Ghazzali, Mishkat al anwar, The Niche for Lights, Asiatic Society Monographs 19, 1924 Volume 5 7. 'A Trealise on the Principles of Shi'te Theology, Oriental Translation Fund New Series 29, 1928 8. Tracts on Listening to Music: Being Dhamm al-malahi by Ibn abi 'l-Dunya and Bawariq al-ilma by Majd al-Din al-Tusi al-Ghazali, London Oriental Translation Fund New Series 34, 1938 9. Introduction to the Science of Tradition, Oriental Translation Fund New Series 39, 1953

46 citations

Book
01 Jun 2007
TL;DR: Frye's translation of Narshakhi's "History of Bukhara" as discussed by the authors provides an engaging, readable narrative that recreates the lively intellectual and commercial life of this vibrant ancient city.
Abstract: Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn al-Narshakhi of Bukhara wrote the history of his city and presented it to the Samanid ruler Nuh ibn Nasr in 943 C.E. (A.H. 332). This is the only book he is known to have written. Narshakhi's ""History of Bukhara"" is unusual among histories of Middle Eastern cities because it provides a broad and perceptive overview of urban life of the time, as opposed to the standard biographies of religious leaders. Richard Frye's translation from the Persian presents an engaging, readable narrative that recreates the lively intellectual and commercial life of this vibrant ancient city. In the tenth century, Bukhara was a cultural center that rivaled Baghdad, and was known as ""the dome of learning in the East."" It was a dynamic metropolis, capital of the semi-independent dynasty that ruled most of present-day Iran and Central Asia. It was in Bukhara that the so-called Persian Renaissance began, with its far-reaching literary implications. Narshakhi portrays not only rulers, but also everyday life in cities and villages. This primary source affords insights into life in Eastern Iran and Central Asia during a period of change in the Islamic world.

40 citations