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Journal ArticleDOI

Kibbutz Buchenwald and Kibbutz Hafetz Hayyim: Two Experiments in the Rehabilitation of Jewish Survivors in Germany

21 Sep 1995-Holocaust and Genocide Studies (Oxford University Press)-Vol. 9, Iss: 2, pp 231-249
About: This article is published in Holocaust and Genocide Studies.The article was published on 1995-09-21. It has received 2 citations till now.
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TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the birth of the state of Israel with particular emphasis on the role of the Zionist ideology and their role after World War II, which saw the mass murder of over 6 million Jewish.
Abstract: This paper explores the birth of the state of Israel with particular emphasis on the role of the Zionist ideology. Zionism as an ideology can be seen not only as a singular ideological view, but as a confluence of multiple ideas that trace back to the 19th century and even earlier to the diaspora of the Jewish people. The final product of the Zionist idea is the state of Israel. Great emphasis in this paper Is given to the role of Zionism after the end of World War II, which saw the mass murder of over 6 million Jewish. Zionism posed the dilemma to the Jewish people in the following terms: the creation of a state where Jewish people could have been represented as the majority with their own rules and legislation and the complete assimilation within other countries. In other words, Zionism aimed to give the Jewish people a nationalistic identity and remains a strong factor that influenced the Jewish people within the DP camps in the aftermath of the Second World conflict. The paper begins with the analysis of Zionism as an ideology from the 19th century onward and the conditions of the Jewish people in the aftermath of World War II. These two points are then analysed to demonstrate two main points. The first is the resiliency and adaptability of the Zionist ideology as the only way forward for the Jewish people and second, the status of the Jewish people as “victims” and this idea gave them the freedom to approach the creation of a new society with a general “benevolence” from the international community.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Yefman et al. as discussed by the authors highlighted the central role that fictional, poetic, and artistic forms play in the construction and understanding of Kibbutz Buchenwald, a little-known episode that took place between 1945-1955 in which a group of 16 Jewish Holocaust survivors came together to build a kibtoz in Israel.
Abstract: ABSTRACT The article highlights the central role that fictional, poetic, and artistic forms play in the construction and understanding of Kibbutz Buchenwald, a little-known episode that took place between 1945–1955 in which a group of 16 Jewish Holocaust survivors came together to build a kibbutz in Israel. The group was formed in Germany immediately after liberation, and after a number of years of preparation eventually immigrated to Israel, where they settled down and formed a kibbutz, whose name was changed to Kibbutz Netzer Sereni. In particular, the article focuses on Gil Yefman’s exhibition ‘Kibbutz Buchenwald’ at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art (Yefman, 2018) in collaboration with Dov Or-Ner and the Kuchinate Collective, as a starting point for the exploration of the affair. The exhibition made use of various art forms to revisit the historical event; it mingled fact and fantasies, revived a variety of narratives and collective traumas, and explored the rift between Holocaust and revival. An analysis of the ‘Goethe Oak’ motif in the exhibition demonstrates the crucial role of fiction in the pursuit of history, and the way in which art can propose a new perception of past and present.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the birth of the state of Israel with particular emphasis on the role of the Zionist ideology and their role after World War II, which saw the mass murder of over 6 million Jewish.
Abstract: This paper explores the birth of the state of Israel with particular emphasis on the role of the Zionist ideology. Zionism as an ideology can be seen not only as a singular ideological view, but as a confluence of multiple ideas that trace back to the 19th century and even earlier to the diaspora of the Jewish people. The final product of the Zionist idea is the state of Israel. Great emphasis in this paper Is given to the role of Zionism after the end of World War II, which saw the mass murder of over 6 million Jewish. Zionism posed the dilemma to the Jewish people in the following terms: the creation of a state where Jewish people could have been represented as the majority with their own rules and legislation and the complete assimilation within other countries. In other words, Zionism aimed to give the Jewish people a nationalistic identity and remains a strong factor that influenced the Jewish people within the DP camps in the aftermath of the Second World conflict. The paper begins with the analysis of Zionism as an ideology from the 19th century onward and the conditions of the Jewish people in the aftermath of World War II. These two points are then analysed to demonstrate two main points. The first is the resiliency and adaptability of the Zionist ideology as the only way forward for the Jewish people and second, the status of the Jewish people as “victims” and this idea gave them the freedom to approach the creation of a new society with a general “benevolence” from the international community.

5 citations