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Book ChapterDOI

Knowledge Management For Dynamic Automotive Networks

25 Sep 2006-pp 591-598

TL;DR: These dynamie automotive networks are facing similar challenges like Dynamic Virtual Organizations (DVO) do, and need to create temporary alliances of organizations to share skills, competences and resources.

AbstractThe automotive industry is facing new challenges from increasing product diversification and complexity, decreasing product live cycle times and the permanent need for cost reduction. Car Manufacturers’ are assigning more and more development tasks and manufacturing orders to suppliers. Suppliers need to create temporary alliances of organizations to share skills, competences and resources. These dynamie automotive networks are facing similar challenges like Dynamic Virtual Organizations (DVO) do.

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Citations
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Book
01 Jan 2008
Abstract: How have Japanese companies become world leaders in the automotive and electronics industries, among others? What is the secret of their success? Two leading Japanese business experts, Ikujiro Nonaka and Hirotaka Takeuchi, are the first to tie the success of Japanese companies to their ability to create new knowledge and use it to produce successful products and technologies. In The Knowledge-Creating Company, Nonaka and Takeuchi provide an inside look at how Japanese companies go about creating this new knowledge organizationally. The authors point out that there are two types of knowledge: explicit knowledge, contained in manuals and procedures, and tacit knowledge, learned only by experience, and communicated only indirectly, through metaphor and analogy. U.S. managers focus on explicit knowledge. The Japanese, on the other hand, focus on tacit knowledge. And this, the authors argue, is the key to their success--the Japanese have learned how to transform tacit into explicit knowledge. To explain how this is done--and illuminate Japanese business practices as they do so--the authors range from Greek philosophy to Zen Buddhism, from classical economists to modern management gurus, illustrating the theory of organizational knowledge creation with case studies drawn from such firms as Honda, Canon, Matsushita, NEC, Nissan, 3M, GE, and even the U.S. Marines. For instance, using Matsushita's development of the Home Bakery (the world's first fully automated bread-baking machine for home use), they show how tacit knowledge can be converted to explicit knowledge: when the designers couldn't perfect the dough kneading mechanism, a software programmer apprenticed herself withthe master baker at Osaka International Hotel, gained a tacit understanding of kneading, and then conveyed this information to the engineers. In addition, the authors show that, to create knowledge, the best management style is neither top-down nor bottom-up, but rather what they call "middle-up-down," in which the middle managers form a bridge between the ideals of top management and the chaotic realities of the frontline. As we make the turn into the 21st century, a new society is emerging. Peter Drucker calls it the "knowledge society," one that is drastically different from the "industrial society," and one in which acquiring and applying knowledge will become key competitive factors. Nonaka and Takeuchi go a step further, arguing that creating knowledge will become the key to sustaining a competitive advantage in the future. Because the competitive environment and customer preferences changes constantly, knowledge perishes quickly. With The Knowledge-Creating Company, managers have at their fingertips years of insight from Japanese firms that reveal how to create knowledge continuously, and how to exploit it to make successful new products, services, and systems.

3,457 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
12 Oct 2020
TL;DR: This paper aims to determine an optimal product portfolio by minimizing the konlwedge transferring costs by using a fuzzy binary linear programming model and using the fuzzy data which make the model more realistic.
Abstract: Purpose The success of any organization in a knowledge-based economy depends on effective knowledge transferring and then proper use of the transferred knowledge. As is known, optimizing the knowledge transferring costs in a product portfolio plays an important role in improving productivity, competitive advantage and profitability of any organization. Therefore, this paper aims to determine an optimal product portfolio by minimizing the konlwedge transferring costs. Design/methodology/approach Here, a fuzzy binary linear programming model is used to select an optimal product portfolio. The model is capable of considering the knowledge transferring costs while taking into account the human-hours constraints for each product by a fuzzy approach. Using fuzzy ranking functions, a reasonable solution of the model can be achieved by classical or metaheuristic algorithms. Findings Numerical experiments indicate that the proposed fuzzy model is practically effective. Originality/value The contributions of this work essentially consist of considering knowledge transferring costs in selecting an optimal product portfolio and using the fuzzy data which make the model more realistic.

4 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The automotive industry is facing new challenges from increasing product diversification, decreasing product life cycle times and the permanent need of cost reduction. The increasing complexity of products and the reduction of costs per unit determine complex manufacturing systems with high levels of automation. The product ramp-up has a crucial role for the financial success in the automotive industry. The performance of a ramp-up depends on the maturity of product and manufacturing system. The reuse of knowledge of experience is an extraordinary driver for the maturity of both product and manufacturing system. A new approach combines the Delphi-method with experience management software based on semantic web technology. The combined solution enables to reuse experience for the development of highly automated manufacturing systems and to minimise ramp-up risks.

References
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Book
01 Jan 2008
Abstract: Japanese companies, masters of manufacturing, have also been leaders in the creation, management, and use of knowledge-especially the tacit and often subjective insights, intuitions, and ideas of employees.

16,867 citations


Book
01 Jan 2008
Abstract: How have Japanese companies become world leaders in the automotive and electronics industries, among others? What is the secret of their success? Two leading Japanese business experts, Ikujiro Nonaka and Hirotaka Takeuchi, are the first to tie the success of Japanese companies to their ability to create new knowledge and use it to produce successful products and technologies. In The Knowledge-Creating Company, Nonaka and Takeuchi provide an inside look at how Japanese companies go about creating this new knowledge organizationally. The authors point out that there are two types of knowledge: explicit knowledge, contained in manuals and procedures, and tacit knowledge, learned only by experience, and communicated only indirectly, through metaphor and analogy. U.S. managers focus on explicit knowledge. The Japanese, on the other hand, focus on tacit knowledge. And this, the authors argue, is the key to their success--the Japanese have learned how to transform tacit into explicit knowledge. To explain how this is done--and illuminate Japanese business practices as they do so--the authors range from Greek philosophy to Zen Buddhism, from classical economists to modern management gurus, illustrating the theory of organizational knowledge creation with case studies drawn from such firms as Honda, Canon, Matsushita, NEC, Nissan, 3M, GE, and even the U.S. Marines. For instance, using Matsushita's development of the Home Bakery (the world's first fully automated bread-baking machine for home use), they show how tacit knowledge can be converted to explicit knowledge: when the designers couldn't perfect the dough kneading mechanism, a software programmer apprenticed herself withthe master baker at Osaka International Hotel, gained a tacit understanding of kneading, and then conveyed this information to the engineers. In addition, the authors show that, to create knowledge, the best management style is neither top-down nor bottom-up, but rather what they call "middle-up-down," in which the middle managers form a bridge between the ideals of top management and the chaotic realities of the frontline. As we make the turn into the 21st century, a new society is emerging. Peter Drucker calls it the "knowledge society," one that is drastically different from the "industrial society," and one in which acquiring and applying knowledge will become key competitive factors. Nonaka and Takeuchi go a step further, arguing that creating knowledge will become the key to sustaining a competitive advantage in the future. Because the competitive environment and customer preferences changes constantly, knowledge perishes quickly. With The Knowledge-Creating Company, managers have at their fingertips years of insight from Japanese firms that reveal how to create knowledge continuously, and how to exploit it to make successful new products, services, and systems.

3,457 citations


"Knowledge Management For Dynamic Au..." refers background in this paper

  • ...The theory concerning the cycle of organizational learning (Nonaka, Takeuchi, 1995) distinguishes two kinds of knowledge: Explicit knowledge is knowledge that easily can be formalized and visualized....

    [...]


Journal Article
TL;DR: A group of social scientists, business managers, and journalists at MIT have developed and tested a tool called the learning history, a written narrative of a company's recent critical event, based on the ancient practice of community storytelling that can build trust, raise important issues, transfer knowledge from one part of the company to another, and help build a body of generalizable knowledge about management.
Abstract: In our personal life, experience is often the best teacher. Not so in corporate life. After a major event--a product failure, a downsizing crisis, or a merger--many companies stumble along, oblivious to the lessons of the past. Mistakes get repeated, but smart decisions do not. Most important, the old ways of thinking are never discussed, so they are still in place to spawn new mishaps. Individuals will often tell you that they understand what went wrong (or right). Yet their insights are rarely shared openly. And they are analyzed and internalized by the company even less frequently. Why? Because managers have few tools with which to capture institutional experience, disseminate its lessons, and translate them into effective action. In an effort to solve this problem, a group of social scientists, business managers, and journalists at MIT have developed and tested a tool called the learning history. It is a written narrative of a company's recent critical event, nearly all of it presented in two columns. In one column, relevant episodes are described by the people who took part in them, were affected by them, or observed them. In the other, learning historians--trained outsiders and knowledgeable insiders--identify recurrent themes in the narrative, pose questions, and raise "undiscussable" issues. The learning history forms the basis for group discussions, both for those involved in the event and for others who also might learn from it. The authors believe that this tool--based on the ancient practice of community storytelling--can build trust, raise important issues, transfer knowledge from one part of a company to another, and help build a body of generalizable knowledge about management.

234 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...Frankfurt am Main: Europäische Hochschulschriften, 1998 18....

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BookDOI
01 Mar 2004
TL;DR: This work focuses on the development of a roadmapping methodology for strategic research on VO in Europe and the challenges faced by collaborative networked organizations in that country.
Abstract: Foreword. Preface. 1: Introduction. 1.1. Towards Next Business Models. 1.2. Some Basic Concepts. 2: New Collaborative Forms. 2.1. Overview. 2.2. VO In Industry: State Of The Art S. Alexakis, B. Kolmel, T. Heep. 2.3. Virtual Organising Scenarios B.R. Katzy, H. Loeh, Chunyan Zhang. 2.4. Emerging collaborative forms L.M. Camarinha-Matos, E. Banahan, J. Pinho de Sousa, F. Sturm, H. Afsarmanesh, J. Barata, J. Playfoot, V. Tschammer. 3: Global and Regional Research Agendas. 3.1. Overview. 3.2. Targeting major new trends L.M. Camarinha-Matos, H. Afsarmanesh, A. Abreu. 3.3. Challenges of Collaborative Networks in Europe H. Afsarmanesh, V. Marik, L.M. Camarinha-Matos. 3.4. A challenge towards VO in Japanese industry: Industrial Cluster T. Kaihara. 3.5. Collaborative networks in Australia - Challenges and recommendations L. Nemes, J. Mo. 3.6. A Brazilian observatory on global and collaborative networked organizations R.J. Rabelo, A.A. Pereira-Klen. 3.7. Some American research concerns on VO H.T. Goranson. 4: Human, Societal, and Organizational Aspects. 4.1. Overview. 4.2. Socio-organizational challenges in the creative economy E. Banahan, J. Playfoot. 4.3. Towards Strategic Management in Collaborative network structures F. Sturm, J. Kemp, R. van Wendel de Joode. 4.4. Collaborative knowledge networks S. Evans, N. Roth. 4.5. Performance measurement and added value of networks S. Evans, N. Roth, F. Sturm. 4.6. Ethical andmoral issues facing the virtual organization S. Hawkins. 5: Information And Communication Technology Factors. 5.1. Overview. 5.2. Support infrastructures for new collaborative forms L.M. Camarinha-Matos, H. Afsarmanesh. 5.3. Agent technology V. Marik, M. Pechoucek. 5.4. ON emerging technologies for VO L.M. Camarinha-Matos, V. Tschammer, H. Afsarmanesh. 6: Foundations and Modeling. 6.1. Overview. 6.2. Emerging behavior in complex collaborative networks L.M. Camarinha-Matos, H. Afsarmanesh. 6.3. Formal modeling methods for collaborative networks L.M. Camarinha-Matos, H. Afsarmanesh. 6.4. Agent technology for virtual organizations V. Marik, M. Pechoucek. 6.5. Modeling social aspects of collaborative networks A. Lucas Soares, J. Pinho de Sousa. 6.6. The organizational semiotics normative paradigm J. Filipe. 7: An Example Roadmap. 7.1. A roadmapping methodology for strategic research on VO L.M. Camarinha-Matos, H. Afsarmanesh. 7.2. A strategic roadmap for advanced Virtual organizations L.M. Camarinha-Matos, H. Afsarmanesh, H. Loh, F. Sturm, M. Ollus. Annexes: A.1. Authors and contributors. A.2. Method of work in thinkcreative project. Subject Index. Author Index.

211 citations


Book
20 Oct 2004
TL;DR: Addressing problems like missing conceptual models, unclear system boundaries, and heterogeneous representations, the authors design a framework for ontology-based information sharing in weakly structured environments like the Semantic Web.
Abstract: The large-scale and almost ubiquitous availability of information has become as much of a curse as it is a blessing. The more information is available, the harder it is to locate any particular piece of it. And even when it has been successfully found, it is even harder still to usefully combine it with other information we may already possess. This problem occurs at many different levels, ranging from the overcrowded disks of our own PCs to the mass of unstructured information on the World Wide Web. It is commonly understood that this problem of information sharing can only be solved by giving computers better access to the semantics of the information. While it has been recognized that ontologies play a crucial role in solving the open problems, most approaches rely on the existence of well-established data structures. To overcome these shortcomings, Stuckenschmidt and van Harmelen describe ontology-based approaches for resolving semantic heterogeneity in weakly structured environments, in particular the World Wide Web. Addressing problems like missing conceptual models, unclear system boundaries, and heterogeneous representations, they design a framework for ontology-based information sharing in weakly structured environments like the Semantic Web. For researchers and students in areas related to the Semantic Web, the authors provide not only a comprehensive overview of the State of the art, but also present in detail recent research in areas like ontology design for information integration, metadata generation and management, and representation and management of distributed ontologies. For professionals in areas such as e-commerce (e.g., the exchange of product knowledge) and knowledge management (e.g., in large and distributed organizations), the book provides decision support on the use of novel technologies, information about potential problems, and guidelines for the successful application of existing technologies.

163 citations


"Knowledge Management For Dynamic Au..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Because of the differences in granularity of data belonging to enterprises of dynamic automotive networks, a hybrid model consisting of global and additional local ontologies would be the best choice in general (Stuckenschmidt, Harmelen, 2005)....

    [...]