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L'Iran sous les Sassanides

01 Jan 1944-
About: The article was published on 1944-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 121 citations till now.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors of Ayadgǫr ǫm Ãǫǫ rǫ i Jǫ spǫg devotes several chapters to an extensive account of the landscape, social customs and religious practices of India, China, Arabia, Barbary, Ceylon (or the region of Slavs), Mazandarān and Turkestan.
Abstract: Although Zoroastrian Pahlavi literature preserves few geographical and ethnographic descriptions of non-Iranian historical regions, the popular book Ayādgār ī Jāmāspīg devotes several chapters to an extensive account of the landscape, social customs and religious practices of India, China, Arabia, Barbary, Ceylon (or the region of Slavs), Mazandarān and Turkestan. These descriptions share many similarities with the accounts of Muslim geographers between the ninth and twelfth centuries ce, though they also contain many Late Sasanian elements. In providing an English translation of these passages, this article aims to identify the inhabitants of these regions as well as to provide a more precise chronology of the chapters. It argues that Zoroastrian authors in the first centuries of the Islamic era, taking as a model the new Islamic science of geography, wrote or reworked these chapters with the intention of redefining and mapping the new world around them.

5 citations


Cites background from "L'Iran sous les Sassanides"

  • ...However, beyond the accounts of travellers and merchants, only the sudden and short conquest of Egypt in 619 CE by Khusraw II, and the consequent occupation of the western regions of Siwa and Faiyum (Christensen 1936: 442; Frye 1983: 336), justify eventual contact between the Sasanians and one of the several Berber tribes located there....

    [...]

  • ...During most of the sixth century CE they defended the kingdom of Himyar, which dominated the South of this peninsula, against the attacks of Ethiopians who had converted to Monophysitism and were supported by the Byzantines (Christensen 1936: 368–69; Frye 1983: 328; Bosworth 1983: 604–9)....

    [...]

  • ...…and merchants, only the sudden and short conquest of Egypt in 619 CE by Khusraw II, and the consequent occupation of the western regions of Siwa and Faiyum (Christensen 1936: 442; Frye 1983: 336), justify eventual contact between the Sasanians and one of the several Berber tribes located there....

    [...]

26 Apr 2016
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined four historical sources originally written in Greek, Armenian, Arabic and Persian regarding Bahrām Cubin and gave light on their respective styles, tendencies and religious and historical affiliations.
Abstract: In this article I will examine four historiographical sources originally written in Greek, Armenian, Arabic and Persian regarding Bahrām Cubin. Given that the sources represent four distinct historiographical traditions they will give light on their respective styles, tendencies and religious and historical affiliations.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 2004
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the etymologie iranienne of the hybrides of the Babylonie achemenide et hellenistique, ainsi qu'un trouve en Egypte, and envisage la possibilite que l'un d'eux (C/2) soit un faux.
Abstract: Cet article etudie vingt-trois anthroponymes de la Babylonie achemenide et hellenistique, ainsi qu'un trouve en Egypte. Dix-huit noms (section A) peuvent trouver une etymologie iranienne avec divers degres de certitude, tandis que trois (section B), qui peuvent avoir une origine non iranienne, demeurent inexpliques. Deux noms (section C) semblent hybrides, c'est-a-dire iranosemitiques, ce qui est une categorie tres rare. On envisage la possibilite que l'un d'eux (C/2) soit un faux.

5 citations

01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: The authors reexaminan las pruebas de persecucion contra los Yazdgird I, cuyo tratamiento de los cristianos supuestamente empeoro durante su reinado.
Abstract: En este articulo se reexaminan las pruebas de la persecucion contra los Yazdgird I, cuyo tratamiento de los cristianos supuestamente empeoro durante su reinado. La comparacion de las fuentes de la historiografia permite poner en duda la realidad de la persecucion. Se argumenta que existen dos narrativas contrapuestas. La de la persecucion se origina probablemente en el Imperio Romano, pero es menos creible. Por lo tanto, la aparicion de estas narrativas debe buscarse en el discurso cris- tiano romano de agresion activa contra los paganos, no en el imperio.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authorship of the Greek version of the Barlaam and Ioasaph legend has been variously attributed to three different authors widely separated in time: to St John of Damascus (c. 676-749), to an anonymous author supposed to have flourished about 600, and to St. Euthymius (d. 1028), a monk of Mount Athos.
Abstract: Source of half a hundred medieval popular romances, the Greek version of the Barlaam and Ioasaph legend has been variously ascribed to three different authors widely separated in time: to St. John of Damascus (c. 676–749), to an anonymous author supposed to have flourished about 600, and to St. Euthymius (d. 1028), a monk of Mount Athos. All three attributions are at present current; it now seems clear that we must discard the first two, and that we are justified in naming Euthymius as the author of this Greek version. The oriental language from which he derived this version we can now identify as Georgian. A brief summary of the evidence which may be adduced for all three attributions is in order here.

4 citations