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L'Iran sous les Sassanides

01 Jan 1944-
About: The article was published on 1944-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 121 citations till now.
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BookDOI
14 Oct 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a list of abbreviations for the Church: 1. "What Has the Emperor to Do with the Church?" Persecution and Martyrdom from Diocletian to Constantine 2. "The God of the Martyrs Refuses You": Religious Violence, Political Discourse, and Christian Identity in the Century after Constantine 3. An Eye for an Eye: Religious Violence in Donatist Africa 4. Temperata Severitas: Augustine, the State, and Disciplinary Violence 5. "There Is No Crime for Those Who Have Christ": Holy
Abstract: Preface and Acknowledgments List of Abbreviations Introduction 1. "What Has the Emperor to Do with the Church?" Persecution and Martyrdom from Diocletian to Constantine 2. "The God of the Martyrs Refuses You": Religious Violence, Political Discourse, and Christian Identity in the Century after Constantine 3. An Eye for an Eye: Religious Violence in Donatist Africa 4. Temperata Severitas: Augustine, the State, and Disciplinary Violence 5. "There Is No Crime for Those Who Have Christ": Holy Men and Holy Violence in the Late Fourth and Early Fifth Centuries 6. "The Monks Commit Many Crimes": Holy Violence Contested 7. "Sanctify Thy Hand by the Blow": Problematizing Episcopal Power 8. Non Iudicium sed Latrocinium: Of Holy Synods and Robber Councils Conclusion Bibliography Index

120 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: A comprehensive survey of Iran's historical development covers everything from its origins in ancient empires to its status as a modern nation state as discussed by the authors, providing a chronological survey of key events in Iranian history up to the present day.
Abstract: This comprehensive survey of Iran's historical development covers everything from its origins in ancient empires to its status as a modern nation-state. * Provides a chronological survey of key events in Iranian history up to the present day * An annotated bibliography surveys historical literature on Iran, including web resources

117 citations

Book
19 Nov 2010
TL;DR: The authors examines catalysts for Buddhist formation in ancient South Asia and expansion throughout and beyond the northwestern Indian subcontinent to Central Asia by investigating symbiotic relationships between networks of religious mobility and trade.
Abstract: This book examines catalysts for Buddhist formation in ancient South Asia and expansion throughout and beyond the northwestern Indian subcontinent to Central Asia by investigating symbiotic relationships between networks of religious mobility and trade.

109 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Saffron has had many different uses such as a food additive and a palliative agent for many human diseases, and is a good candidate with many promising potentials to be considered for new drug design.
Abstract: Objective: During the ancient times, saffron (Crocus sativus L.) had many uses around the world; however, some of these uses were forgotten throughout the history. But a newly formed interest in natural active compounds brought back the attention toward historical uses of saffron. Understanding different uses of saffron in the past can help us finding the best uses at present.In this study, wereviewed different uses of saffron throughout the history among different nations. Methods: ISI web of Science and Medline, along with references of traditional Iranian medicine were searched for historical uses of saffron. Results: Saffron has been known since more than 3000 years ago by many nations. It was valued not only as a culinary condiment, but also as a dye, perfume and as a medicinal herb. Its medicinal uses ranged from treating eye problems to genitourinary and many other diseases in various cultures. It was also used as a tonic agent and antidepressant drug among many nations. Conclusion(s): Saffron has had many different uses such as a food additive and a palliative agent for many human diseases. Thus, as an important medicinal herb, it is a good candidate with many promising potentials to be considered for new drug design.

90 citations


Cites background from "L'Iran sous les Sassanides"

  • ...They used saffron as an ingredient of various foods, for topping and for dyeing silk, fabric and rugs (Abrishami 1987; Christensen 2004)....

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Book
01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: Armenians believed in a supreme God, Ahura Mazda (Arm. Aramazd), the Creator of all that is good, who is assisted by supernatural beings of His own creation, by good men and by good creatures against the separate, uncreated Evil Spirit (Av. Angra Mainyu, Arm. Arhmn, Haramani) and its demonic hosts and destructive assaults.
Abstract: From the time of the conquest of Assyria and Urartu by the Medes to the fall of the Sasanian Empire to the Muslim Arabs some thirteen centuries later, Armenian culture developed under the religious, political and linguistic influence of various Iranian empires. For most of this period the dominant religion of the Iranians was Zoroastrianism, and there exists abundant evidence to show that this religion was practised also by the Armenians from the time of the Achaemenians. The religion waned in Armenia following the conversion of the Armenian Arsacid king Tiridates III to Christianity early in the fourth century, and most information on the earlier faith must be culled from hostile Armenian Christian texts of the fifth century and later. Like the Zoroastrians of Iran, the ancient Armenians believed in a supreme God, Ahura Mazda (Arm. Aramazd), the Creator of all that is good, who is assisted by supernatural beings of His own creation, by good men and by His good creatures against the separate, uncreated Evil Spirit (Av. Angra Mainyu, Arm. Arhmn, Haramani) and its demonic hosts and destructive assaults. Armenian texts contain names, theological terms and references to rituals and usages, most often loan-words from Middle Iranian, which enable us to reconstruct a picture of pre-Christian Armenian religious life and thought similar to that provided by Zoroastrian sources in Iran. Non-Zoroastrian customs and divinities from ancient Urartu, Asia Minor and the Semitic world may also be found in Armenia, but frequently such elements were also incorporated into Iranian Zoroastrianism. It is argued that the prevailing view of Armenian religion before Christianity as merely syncretistic is therefore inaccurate, and that the Armenians practised a form of Zoroastrianism that differed from that of Pars or other Iranian lands, only in as much as the various national Churches of Christianity today maintain divers local traditions. The Armenians opposed the iconoclastic and other reforms instituted by Ardesir I and his successors; and the Armenian Zoroastrians, isolated from the great mass of their co-religionists, suffered further setbacks with the conversion of their countrymen to Christianity. Yet the ancient religion survived in folk custom, in certain celebrations of the Armenian Church, and through the sect of the Children of the Sun, down to recent times.

70 citations