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L'Iran sous les Sassanides

01 Jan 1944-
About: The article was published on 1944-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 121 citations till now.
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01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this article, the authors draw on evolutionary psychology to elucidate ultimate causation in imperial state formation and predatory exploitation in antiquity and beyond, showing that differential access to the means of reproduction was a key feature of early imperial systems.
Abstract: This paper draws on evolutionary psychology to elucidate ultimate causation in imperial state formation and predatory exploitation in antiquity and beyond. Differential access to the means of reproduction is shown to have been a key feature of early imperial systems. (This revised paper replaces Version 1.0 posted in November 2005.)

46 citations

Book
07 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the influence and significance of the four sects of Islam and their followers are discussed. But the authors do not discuss the relation between the four groups. And they do not consider the relation of the three groups.
Abstract: 1. Earlier movements. 'Abd Allah ibn Saba' and his followers. Al-Mukhtar and the Kaisaniyya 2. Bayan ibn Sam'an and the Bayaniyya 3. Al-Mughira ibn Sa'id and the Mughiriyya 4. Abu Mansur Al-'ijli and the Mansuriyya 5. 'Abd Allah ibn Mu'Awiya and the Janahiyya 6. Influence and significance of the four sects Conclusion.

44 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Mar 2001
TL;DR: Theodosius II as discussed by the authors assumed sole rulership of the eastern half of the Roman empire in 408, and became head of a state which during the short reign of his father Arcadius (395-408) had experienced an extraordinary array of crises.
Abstract: When he assumed sole rulership of the eastern half of the Roman empire in 408, Theodosius II became head of a state which during the short reign of his father Arcadius (395–408) had experienced an extraordinary array of crises. Gothic troops in Roman employ had risen in revolt under the leadership of Alaric in 395 and spent much time during the following years freely plundering the Balkan provinces until Alaric eventually decided to move westwards (401). Also in 395, nomadic Huns had invaded the empire through the Caucasus, bringing widespread destruction to Syria and eastern Asia Minor until 397. Another Goth named Gainas, who held a command in the Roman army, instigated a revolt which was only suppressed in 400 with much bloodshed in and around Constantinople. Within a few years there was further turmoil in the capital over the bitterly contested deposition and exile of the bishop John Chrysostom (403–4), while eastern Asia Minor suffered a prolonged bout of raiding by Isaurian brigands (403–6). In addition to all this, relations with the western half of the empire throughout Arcadius’ reign were characterized by antagonism and mutual suspicion, the result of the ambitions and rivalries of dominant individuals, such as Eutropius and Stilicho, at the courts of Arcadius in Constantinople and his younger brother Honorius in the west.

42 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study brings to light for the first time the era's medical views on the heart and blood, based on extant Sassanid Pahlavi manuscripts and documents, and describes the first theories on infection due to an external living factor, today known as the microbe.

37 citations