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Book

Language and identity

01 Jan 2004-
TL;DR: The authors outlines the relationshop between our identity as members of groups-ethnic, national, religious and gender-and the language varieties important to each group, and discusses the importance of language varieties for each group.
Abstract: This book about outlines the relationshop between our identity as members of groups-ethnic, national, religious and gender-and the language varieties important to each group.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that contemporary poststructuralist theories of language, identity, and power offer new perspectives on language learning and teaching, and have been of considerable interest in our field, and anticipate that the identities and investments of language learners, as well as their teachers, will continue to generate exciting and innovative research in the future.
Abstract: In this review article on identity, language learning, and social change, we argue that contemporary poststructuralist theories of language, identity, and power offer new perspectives on language learning and teaching, and have been of considerable interest in our field. We first review poststructuralist theories of language, subjectivity, and positioning and explain sociocultural theories of language learning. We then discuss constructs of investment and imagined communities/imagined identities (Norton Peirce 1995; Norton 1997, 2000, 2001), showing how these have been used by diverse identity researchers. Illustrative examples of studies that investigate how identity categories like race, gender, and sexuality interact with language learning are discussed. Common qualitative research methods used in studies of identity and language learning are presented, and we review the research on identity and language teaching in different regions of the world. We examine how digital technologies may be affecting language learners' identities, and how learner resistance impacts language learning. Recent critiques of research on identity and language learning are explored, and we consider directions for research in an era of increasing globalization. We anticipate that the identities and investments of language learners, as well as their teachers, will continue to generate exciting and innovative research in the future.

794 citations

Book
Alex Mullen1
19 Aug 2013
TL;DR: In this paper, a multilingualism and multiple identities in Southern Gaul has been investigated, including the influence of the Mediterranean koine and the loci of cultural change from the Augustan period.
Abstract: Part I. Multilingualism and Multiple Identities: Interdisciplinary Methodologies: 1. Multiple voices 2. Language contact and community dynamics 3. Bilingual texts and community dynamics 4. Scripts as indicators of contact 5. Names as indicators of contact Part II. Multilingualism and Multiple Identities in Southern Gaul: 6. Gallia in Graeciam translata? Investigating Gaulish-Greek linguistic contacts 7. 'La Celtique mediterraneenne'? Investigating the influence of the Mediterranean koine 8. 'D'ou rayonna en Occident la civilisation'? Investigating the loci of cultural change 9. Being Greek, becoming Roman, staying Celtic? Ethnolinguistic vitality from the Augustan period 10. Conclusions Appendices.

96 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Van Parijs's Linguistic Justice for Europe and the World as discussed by the authors furthers a nascent examination of multilingualism within political philosophy, drawing on continental European contexts where multiilingualism is the norm.
Abstract: Van Parijs’s Linguistic Justice for Europe and the World furthers a nascent examination of multilingualism within political philosophy, drawing on continental European contexts where multilingualism is the norm. Van Parijs argues, in effect for linguistic cosmopolitanism via English as the current world language, and this seems ostensibly to be a considerable improvement on ‘the untrammeled public monolingualism’ of Anglo-American political theory. However, Van Parijs’s account is flawed in four key respects. First, there is the fundamental problem of his reductionist account of language – by which language is viewed only in terms of its communicative uses and reach and not in relation to its symbolic and identity functions. Second is his simplistic advocacy of English as a global lingua franca, which ignores issues of power and inequality, along with related delimited access to high-status English language varieties. Third are the inherent limitations associated with his advocacy of linguistic territoria...

67 citations

Book
30 Sep 2020
TL;DR: This textbook provides a lively and accessible introduction to world Englishes, describing varieties used in regions as diverse as America, the Caribbean, Australia, Africa, and Asia, and setting them within their historical and social contexts.
Abstract: The global spread of English has had widespread linguistic, social, and cultural implications, affecting the lives of millions of people around the world. This textbook provides a lively and accessible introduction to world Englishes, describing varieties used in regions as diverse as America, the Caribbean, Australia, Africa, and Asia, and setting them within their historical and social contexts. Students are guided through the material with chapter summaries, discussion questions and exercises, and a comprehensive glossary, helping them to understand different varieties of English. The second edition is substantially updated, including new sections on English as a Lingua Franca, blurring boundaries, and research methods and resources. The book is accompanied by a useful website, containing textual and audio examples of the varieties introduced in the text. Providing essential knowledge and skills for those embarking on the study of world Englishes, this is a timely update of the leading introduction to the subject.

65 citations

Book ChapterDOI
03 Oct 2012
TL;DR: Bilingualism and multilingualism have both de facto existences and important places in the psychological, political, and social debates that defi ne social and ethnic groups, communities, and regions as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Bilingualism and multilingualism have both de facto existences and important places in the psychological, political, and social debates that defi ne social and ethnic groups, communities, and regions. Very widespread phenomena, they arise for a number of well understood reasons; in the main, however, they are also quite unremarkable phenomena, fuelled by necessity up to, but rarely beyond, appropriately useful levels of competence. They imply both heightened and lessened opportunities for interpersonal and intercultural exchange: multilingual capacities at an individual level can obviously broaden possibilities, but a world of many languages is also one in which communicative problems exist. In such a world, lingua francas and translation are required. 1

52 citations

References
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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1984
TL;DR: The authors reviewed the link between ethnic identity and language, and considered whether language is a proper vehicle for preserving ethnic identities in the face of language change and showed that language is not always a necessary component of ethnic identity.
Abstract: Publisher Summary This chapter reviews the link between ethnic identity and language A particular “associated language” is a necessary component of ethnic identity but the language that people associate themselves with, need not be the one that they use in their day-to-day lives It need not even be one that they know at all There are situations where people associate themselves with many languages and identify themselves as members of a multilingual group In such situations, people use their different languages in different circumstances They do this in common with other members of their group and feel that they belong, then, to one multilingual group with respect to their urban behavior—rather than to several unilingual ones In the United States, Italian-Americans who associate the Italian language with their ethnic identity may know few Italian words The Alaskan educational policy of setting up wherever feasible village primary and secondary schools staffed by native teachers trained in cross-cultural education development (X-CED) programs is ensuring that ethnic identities are preserved despite the change The chapter considers whether language is a proper vehicle for preserving ethnic identities in the face of language change

51 citations