scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Book

Language in Canada

10 Jun 2010-
TL;DR: The fading Canadian duality as mentioned in this paper has been identified as a major obstacle in the development of bilingualism in Canada and has been addressed by bridging educational policy and social psychological research.
Abstract: Introduction 1. The foundations 2. The fading Canadian duality 3. Official bilingualism: from the 1960s to the 1990s 4. Official multiculturalism 5. Language in education: bridging educational policy and social psychological research 6. Aboriginal languages:history 7. Aboriginal languages: current status 8. French: Canadian varieties 9. French in Quebec 10. French in New Brunswick 11. French outside New Brunswick and Quebec 12. English: Canadian varieties 13. English Quebec 14. The teaching of international languages 15. French immersion in Canada 16. Language in Newfoundland 17. Language in Prince Edward Island 18. Language in Nova Scotia 19. Language in New Brunswick 20. Language in Quebec: Aboriginal and heritage varieties 21. Language in Ontario 22. Language in Manitoba 23. Language in Saskatchewan: Anglo-hegemony maintained 24. Language in Alberta: unilingualism in practice 25. Language in British Columbia 26. Language in the Northwest Territories and the Yukon Territory.
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examined the role of ethnicity in conditioning linguistic variation and found that speakers may vary in overall rate, but linguistic conditioning remains largely constant across and within ethnic groups, while there is evidence for language transfer in the first generation, differences between generations suggest that transfer does not persist.
Abstract: Following recent work that questions traditional social categories, this paper examines the role of ethnicity in conditioning linguistic variation. Reporting on a large-scale project in the multicultural context of Toronto, we argue for combining emic and etic approaches to social categorization. Focusing on the Chinese and Italian communities, our analysis of two sociolinguistic variables shows that speakers may vary in overall rate, but linguistic conditioning remains largely constant across and within ethnic groups. Whereas there is evidence for language transfer in the first generation, differences between generations suggest that transfer does not persist. Some speakers appear to use overall rates to express ethnic identity. Differences between communities may be explained in terms of different timelines of settlement and visible-minority status.

173 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article found that heritage language learners were more likely than non-heritage learners to learn German because it was an important aspect of their self-concept, and that although intrinsic and self-determined extrinsic orientations fostered motivation for learning German, aspects of contact with the German community also played a role in motivated learning.
Abstract: This study examined how two motivational substrates may be differentially important depending upon the learner's language background. Students registered in German classes (N = 99) completed a questionnaire that assessed (a) their intrinsic, extrinsic, integrative, and instrumental reasons for learning German; (b) their feelings of autonomy, competence, and relatedness; and (c) their engagement in language learning and intergroup contact variables. The results show that heritage language learners were more likely than non-heritage learners to learn German because it was an important aspect of their self-concept. Moreover, although intrinsic and self-determined extrinsic orientations fostered motivation both for heritage and non-heritage learners, aspects of contact with the German community also played a role in motivated learning, particularly for heritage language learners.

78 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Hyunsoon Kim1
TL;DR: It is shown that high vocoid-conditioned phonological stop assibilation is motivated by the brief period of turbulence that sometimes occurs at the release of a plosive into a high vocoids, and phonetic analysis explains the phonetic origin of assibiliation.
Abstract: This paper proposes a phonetically based account of phonological stop assibilation. We first review evidence for the phonological representation of sibilants proposed by Jakobson et al. (1951) and others. An examination of cross-linguistic data involving phonological assibilation reveals two asymmetries: (a) only high vocoids constitute assibilation triggers; (b) only following vocoids, not preceding vocoids, constitute assibilation triggers. It is then shown that high vocoid-conditioned phonological stop assibilation is motivated by the brief period of turbulence that sometimes occurs at the release of a plosive into a high vocoid. We argue that this turbulence is interpreted in phonology as the insertion of the feature [+strident] into the representation of the plosive, with the loss of the feature [−continuant] in the case of frication. Not only does this phonetic analysis explain the phonetic origin of assibilation, it also correctly reflects the cross-linguistic conditions on high vocoid-conditioned phonological assibilation.

70 citations

Book
01 Aug 2016
TL;DR: Although tracing the exact origins of this field of enquiry is no doubt a fascinating enterprise, it is best left to forensic enthusiasts more knowledgeable than me in discovering the relevant historical data.
Abstract: What motivates some linguistic minorities to maintain their language? Why do others shift away from it rather quickly? Are there specific conditions - environmental or personal - influencing these dynamics? What can families and communities do to pass on their 'threatened' language to the next generation? These and related questions are investigated in detail in Language Maintenance and Shift. In this fascinating book, Anne Pauwels analyses the patterns of language use exhibited by individuals and groups living in multilingual societies, and explores their efforts to maintain their heritage or minority language. She explores the various methods used to analyse language maintenance, from linguistic demography to linguistic biography, and offers guidance on how to research the language patterns and practices of linguistic minorities around the world.

68 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe a project designed to assess the impact of a majority language on the structure of the minority language in a situation of long-term contact, by comparing the behaviour of linguistic phenomena (1) over (apparent) time, according to intensity of contact, and (2) against French as a non-contact benchmark and putative source.
Abstract: Although the received wisdom is that English in Quebec, as a minority language, has undergone contact-induced language change, little scientific evidence has been brought to bear on this claim. We describe a project designed to assess the impact of a majority language on the structure of the minority language in a situation of long-term contact. The existence and directionality of change is assessed by comparing the behaviour of linguistic phenomena (1) over (apparent) time, (2) according to intensity of contact, and (3) against French as a non-contact benchmark and putative source. We detail the methods employed in selecting a sample and constituting a corpus, and characterize the speakers and aspects of their speech. Finally, we present an analysis of the sociolinguistic situation of the Quebec anglophone community, and offer an empirical measure of the impact of the French lexicon on Quebec English. Malgrele fait qu'il est souvent pris pour acquis que l'anglais au Quebec, en tant que langue minoritaire, a subit un changement linguistique provoque par le contact, peu de recherches scientifiques se sont penchees sur cette question. Nous decrivons un projet dont le but est d'evaluer l'impact d'une langue majoritaire sur la structure de la langue minoritaire dans une situation de contact a long terme. L'existence et la directionnalite du changement sont evaluees en comparant le comportement de phenomenes linguistiques en fonction (1) du temps (apparent), (2) de l'intensite du contact et (3) du franc¸ ais comme facteur de non-contact et de source de changement. Nous presentons les methodes employees dans la selection de l'e chantillon et la constitution d'un corpus, et nous de crivons les locuteurs et les caracteristiques de leur parler. Finalement, nous presentons une analyse de la situation sociolinguistique de la communaute anglophone au Quebec, et nous offrons une mesure empirique de l'impact du lexique franc¸ ais sur l'anglais du Que´ bec.

67 citations