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Book ChapterDOI

Latin and Greek Christians

01 Jan 2008-pp 213-229
TL;DR: The history of the schism between the Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox churches between the seventh century and the eleventh is described in this article, where the authors focus on the early stages of the conflict.
Abstract: At the end of Late Antiquity, when this chapter begins, the Alps were a Great Divide between Mediterranean cultures and transalpine ones; Rome and Constantinople had more in common with one another than either did with Germanic groups in the north. The emperors in Constantinople still wielded enough authority in Rome to arrest popes who resisted their policies, and the papal apokrisiarios at the imperial court was an important figure in Rome. But by 1100 the popes themselves often came from north of the Alps, few in the West knew Greek, and imperial authority, when acknowledged in Rome, came from Germany. The Latin world, developing with, assimilated to, and combined with the Germanic world of northwestern Europe, had lost sympathy for imperial and Byzantine ways of ruling while developing its own hierarchies. The role and prestige of the popes in the western church was beyond the ken of Byzantines, while the role of the emperor in the eastern church puzzled and appalled Latin Christians. Theological and ritual differences added to a general sense of estrangement, reflected most famously in chronicles of the crusades. To describe relations between Greek and Latin Christians between the seventh century and the eleventh is, then, to write the history of the schism between the Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox churches. Yet overabundant hindsight lurks in such a statement. A narrative which begins at the end – with schism – tends to overemphasize disagreements in earlier eras and to overlook charity and cooperation. It tends to rely on sources that “explain” the origins of the schism and to overlook sources that assume or explicitly say that there was no schism at all.
Citations
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01 Jan 1992
TL;DR: The body politics of Julia Kristeva and the Body Politics of JuliaKristeva as discussed by the authors are discussed in detail in Section 5.1.1 and Section 6.2.1.
Abstract: Preface (1999) Preface (1990) 1. Subjects of Sex/Gender/Desire I. 'Women' as the Subject of Feminism II. The Compulsory Order of Sex/Gender/Desire III. Gender: The Circular Ruins of Contemporary Debate IV. Theorizing the Binary, the Unitary and Beyond V. Identity, Sex and the Metaphysics of Substance VI. Language, Power and the Strategies of Displacement 2. Prohibition, Psychoanalysis, and the Production of the Heterosexual Matrix I. Structuralism's Critical Exchange II. Lacan, Riviere, and the Strategies of Masquerade III. Freud and the Melancholia of Gender IV. Gender Complexity and the Limits of Identification V. Reformulating Prohibition as Power 3. Subversive Bodily Acts I. The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva II. Foucault, Herculine, and the Politics of Sexual Discontinuity III. Monique Wittig - Bodily Disintegration and Fictive Sex IV. Bodily Inscriptions, Performative Subversions Conclusion - From Parody to Politics

1,125 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a survey of the history of the Latin language and its use in literature, including the following: 1. THE HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 2. INTELLECTUAL CENTRES 3. BOOKS and LIBRARIES 4. THE REVIVAL OF LATIN CLASSICS 5. LATIN LANGUAGE 6. THE LATIN POETRY 7. THE VIETNATION of JURISPRUDENCE 8. Historical WRITING 9. THE TRANSLATORS FROM GREEK and ARA
Abstract: 1. THE HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 2. INTELLECTUAL CENTRES 3. BOOKS AND LIBRARIES 4. THE REVIVAL OF THE LATIN CLASSICS 5. THE LATIN LANGUAGE 6. LATIN POETRY 7. THE REVIVAL OF JURISPRUDENCE 8. HISTORICAL WRITING 9. THE TRANSLATORS FROM GREEK AND ARABIC 10. THE REVIVAL OF SCIENCE 11. THE REVIVAL OF PHILOSOPHY 12. THE BEGINNINGS OF UNIVERSITIES INDEX

309 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the evolution of female ascetic life and the demise of the Homoiousian model in Asia Minor: "Virgins of God", "Parthenoi", widows, deaconesses, etc.
Abstract: Part 1 Asia Minor: \"Virgins of God\" - variations of female ascetic life Basil of Caesarea - the classic model in the background - Macrina and Naucratius Homoisousian asceticism \"Parthenoi\", widows, deaconesses - continuing variety symbiosis of male and female ascetics and the demise of the Homoiousian model. Part 2 Egypt: canons and papyri desert-mothers and wandering virgins - the \"Apophthegmata Patrum\" Pachomius and Shenoute - the other classic model \"in the desert and in the countryside, in towns or villages\" - the \"Historia Lausiaca\" and the \"Historia Monachorum\" Athanasius of Alexandria and urban asceticism.

182 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A detailed survey of illustrations and maps of the Middle Ages can be found in this paper, with a focus on the changing fortunes of a Curative Shrine: St Thomas Cantilupe and the Destruction of the Shrines.
Abstract: List of Illustrations and Maps - Introduction - PART 1: HISTORICAL BACKGROUND - Dark Age Christianity: Miracles in the Missionary Epoch -The Holy Dead and their Relics - Pilgrims' Progress and Wonder Tales - PART 2: ENGLISH SHRINES AND PILGRIMS - Faith-Healing: Medicine and Miracle - Saintly Therapy in Action: Shrine-cures and Home-cures - Recording and Sorting Posthumous Miracles - Murders and Miracle-cults in Twelfth-century England - Saints, Sickness and Snobbery: Shrines and their Clientele - Maps and Miracles: The Geography of Pilgrimage -The Changing Fortunes of a Curative Shrine: St. Thomas Cantilupe - PART 3: THE END OF THE MIDDLE AGES AND THE REFORMATION - Shifting Loyalties: New Shrines and Old Saints at the end of the Middle Ages - The Destruction of the Shrines - Conclusion - Abbreviations - Notes - Select Bibliography - Index

178 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: Blair as discussed by the authors traces how the widespread foundation of monastic sites ('minsters') during c.670-730 gave the recently pagan English new ways of living, of exploiting their resources, and of absorbing European culture, as well as opening new spiritual and intellectual horizons.
Abstract: From the impact of the first monasteries in the seventh century, to the emergence of the local parochial system five hundred years later, the Church was a force for change in Anglo-Saxon society. It shaped culture and ideas, social and economic behaviour, and the organization of landscape and settlement. This book traces how the widespread foundation of monastic sites ('minsters') during c.670-730 gave the recently pagan English new ways of living, of exploiting their resources, and of absorbing European culture, as well as opening new spiritual and intellectual horizons. Through the era of Viking wars, and the tenth-century reconstruction of political and economic life, the minsters gradually lost their wealth, their independence, and their role as sites of high culture, but grew in stature as foci of local society and eventually towns. After 950, with the increasing prominence of manors, manor-houses, and village communities, a new and much larger category of small churches were founded, endowed, and rebuilt: the parish churches of the emergent eleventh- and twelfth-century local parochial system. In this innovative study, John Blair brings together written, topographical, and archaeological evidence to build a multi-dimensional picture of what local churches and local communities meant to each other in early England.

142 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: The body politics of Julia Kristeva and the Body Politics of JuliaKristeva as mentioned in this paper are discussed in detail in Section 5.1.1 and Section 6.2.1.
Abstract: Preface (1999) Preface (1990) 1. Subjects of Sex/Gender/Desire I. 'Women' as the Subject of Feminism II. The Compulsory Order of Sex/Gender/Desire III. Gender: The Circular Ruins of Contemporary Debate IV. Theorizing the Binary, the Unitary and Beyond V. Identity, Sex and the Metaphysics of Substance VI. Language, Power and the Strategies of Displacement 2. Prohibition, Psychoanalysis, and the Production of the Heterosexual Matrix I. Structuralism's Critical Exchange II. Lacan, Riviere, and the Strategies of Masquerade III. Freud and the Melancholia of Gender IV. Gender Complexity and the Limits of Identification V. Reformulating Prohibition as Power 3. Subversive Bodily Acts I. The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva II. Foucault, Herculine, and the Politics of Sexual Discontinuity III. Monique Wittig - Bodily Disintegration and Fictive Sex IV. Bodily Inscriptions, Performative Subversions Conclusion - From Parody to Politics

21,123 citations

Book
01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a very different view of the arts of practice in a very diverse culture, focusing on the use of ordinary language and making do in the art of practice.
Abstract: Preface General Introduction PART I: A VERY ORDINARY CULTURE I. A Common Place: Ordinary Language II. Popular Cultures: Ordinary Language III. Making Do: Uses and Tactics PART II: THEORIES OF THE ART OF PRACTICE IV. Foucault and Bourdieu V. The Arts of Theory VI. Story Time PART III: SPATIAL PRACTICES VII. Walking in the City VIII. Railway Navigation and Incarceration IX. Spatial Stories PART IV: Uses of Language X. The Scriptural Economy XI. Quotations of Voices XII. Reading as Poaching PART V: WAYS OF BELIEVING XIII. Believing and Making People Believe XIV. The Unnamable Indeterminate Notes

10,978 citations

BookDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary are discussed, as well as the Assumption of Sex, in the context of critical queering, passing and arguing with the real.
Abstract: Preface Acknowledgements Part 1: 1. Bodies that Matter 2. The Lesbian Phallus and the Morphological Imaginary 3. Phantasmatic Identification and the Assumption of Sex 4. Gender is Burning: Questions of Appropriation and Subversion Part 2: 5. 'Dangerous Crossing': Willa Cather's Masculine Names 6. Queering, Passing: Nella Larsen Rewrites Psychoanalysis 7. Arguing with the Real 8. Critically Queer. Notes. Index

10,391 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a plan of the present work, from absolute space to abstract space, from the Contradictions of Space to Differential Space, and from Contradictory Space to Social Space.
Abstract: Translatora s Acknowledgements. 1. Plan of the Present Work. 2. Social Space. 3. Spatial Architectonics. 4. From Absolute Space to Abstract Space. 5. Contradictory Space. 6. From the Contradictions of Space to Differential Space. 7. Openings and Conclusions. Afterword by David Harvey. Index.

10,114 citations

Book
13 Dec 2002
TL;DR: Purity and Danger as mentioned in this paper is widely cited in non-anthropological works and gave rise to a body of application, rebuttal and development within anthropology within the field of religion and science.
Abstract: Purity and Danger is acknowledged as a modern masterpiece of anthropology. It is widely cited in non-anthropological works and gave rise to a body of application, rebuttal and development within anthropology. In 1995 the book was included among the Times Literary Supplement's hundred most influential non-fiction works since WWII. Incorporating the philosophy of religion and science and a generally holistic approach to classification, Douglas demonstrates the relevance of anthropological enquiries to an audience outside her immediate academic circle. She offers an approach to understanding rules of purity by examining what is considered unclean in various cultures. She sheds light on the symbolism of what is considered clean and dirty in relation to order in secular and religious, modern and primitive life.

5,427 citations