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Book ChapterDOI

Le jardin des Parva naturalia : les Plantes chez Aristote et après lui

01 Jan 2010-
About: The article was published on 2010-01-01. It has received 27 citations till now.
Citations
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Journal Article
TL;DR: This reading book is your chosen book to accompany you when in your free time, in your lonely, this kind of book can help you to heal the lonely and get or add the inspirations to be more inoperative.
Abstract: The herophilus the art of medicine in early alexandria that we provide for you will be ultimate to give preference. This reading book is your chosen book to accompany you when in your free time, in your lonely. This kind of book can help you to heal the lonely and get or add the inspirations to be more inoperative. Yeah, book as the widow of the world can be very inspiring manners. As here, this book is also created by an inspiring author that can make influences of you to do more.

105 citations

01 Sep 2003
TL;DR: In this article, a new interpretation of Analytica Posteriora II.11.11 is presented, and a theoretical picture of the structure of teleological explanations gained from Aristotle's theory of scientific demonstration is presented.
Abstract: This dissertation explores Aristotle’s use of teleology as a principle of explanation, especially as it is used in the natural treatises. Its main purposes are, first, to determine the function, structure, and explanatory power of teleological explanations in four of Aristotle’s natural treatises, that is, in Physica (book II), De Anima, De Partibus Animalium (including the practice in books II-IV), and De Caelo (book II). Its second purpose is to confront these findings about Aristotle’s practice in the natural treatises with the theoretical picture of the structure of teleological explanations gained from Aristotle’s theory of scientific demonstration. For this purpose a new interpretation of Analytica Posteriora II.11 is presented. This study thereby contributes to recent scholarship on the relation between Aristotle’s philosophy of science and his philosophy of nature, while at the same time adding to our knowledge of Aristotle’s notion of teleology in terms of its explanatory merits and limits.

27 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: Crick, Edelman, Blakemore, Young, Frisby, Gregory, Marr, Johnson-Laird, and Sperry as mentioned in this paper discussed the problem of attributing psychological predicates to an inner entity.
Abstract: Preface Part I: Philosophical Problems In Neuroscience: Their Historical and Conceptual Roots: 1 The Early Growth Of Neuroscientific Knowledge: The Integrative Action Of The Nervous System Aristotle, Galen and Nemesius: The Origins Of The Ventricular Doctrine Fernel and Descartes: The Demise Of The Ventricular Doctrine The Cortical Doctrine Of Willis and Its Aftermath The Conception Of A Reflex: Bell, Magendie and Marshall Hall Localizing Function In The Cortex: Broca, Fritz and Hitzig The Integrative Action Of The Nervous System: Sherrington 2 The Cortex and The Mind In The Work Of Sherrington and His Proteges Charles Sherrington: The Continuing Cartesian Impact Edgar Adrian: Hesitant Cartesianism John Eccles and The 'Liaison Brain' Wilder Penfield and The 'Highest Brain Mechanism' 3 The Mereological Fallacy and Its Manifestation In Contemporary Neuroscientific Thought Mereological Confusions In Cognitive Neuroscience: (Crick, Edelman, Blakemore, Young, Frisby, Gregory, Marr, Johnson-Laird) Methodological Qualms: (Ullman, P S Churchland, Blakemore, Zeki, Young, Milner Squire and Kandel, Marr, Frisby, Sperry) On The Grounds For Ascribing Psychological Predicates To A Being: (Crick, Baars) On The Grounds For Misascribing Psychological Predicates To An Inner Entity: (Damasio, Edelman and Tononi, Kosslyn and Ochsner, Searle, James, Libet, Humphrey, Blakemore, Crick) The Inner: (Damasio) Introspection: (Humphrey, Johnson-Laird, Weiskrantz) Privileged Access: Direct and Indirect: (Blakemore) Privacy Or Subjectivity: (Searle) The Meaning Of Psychological Predicates and How They Are Learnt: (Searle) Of The Mind and Its Nature: (Gazzaniga, Doty) Part II: Human Faculties and Contemporary Neuroscience: an Analysis: Preliminaries Brain-Body Dualism: (Kandel Schwartz and Jessell, Libet) The Project: (Gazzaniga) The Category Of The Psychological: (Nagel, P M Churchland and P S Churchland) 4 Sensation and Perception Sensation: (Searle, Libet, Geldard and Sherrick) Perception: (Ledoux, Crick) Perception As The Causation Of Sensations: Primary and Secondary Qualities: (Kandel Schwartz and Jessell, Rock) Perception As Hypothesis Formation: Helmholtz: (Helmholtz, Gregory, Glynn, Young)

1,188 citations

Book
01 Jan 1983

200 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Tornikes, the Metropolitan of Ephesus as mentioned in this paper, was a Byzantine writer of the middle of the twelfth century and his funeral oration on Anna Comnena.
Abstract: The Byzantinist has one advantage over the student of classical antiquity—unless the latter happens to be a papyrologist. With a little diligence and a minimum of good luck he can easily unearth unpublished texts and find himself producing an editio princeps. And however often one has turned over the leaves of a manuscript and laboriously read words which have remained unread for perhaps five centuries or more, it never loses its thrill. Yet one must admit that the advantage is less than it seems. The classical scholar's texts are usually worth reading from some point of view, while what the Byzantinist finds is so often empty rhetorical verbiage. Byzantine funeral orations are notorious for their lack of information on the life of the deceased. Yet they never tell us absolutely nothing if we read them alertly, and they are sometimes remarkably informative on the ideas and values of the times. When the subject is a major figure of medieval Greek literature about the details of whose life we are very much in the dark, even the most trifling addition to our knowledge is welcome. It is this thought which encourages me to present a hitherto unknown Byzantine writer of the middle of the twelfth century—George Tornikes, Metropolitan of Ephesus—and to dwell in particular on his funeral oration on Anna Comnena.

109 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: This reading book is your chosen book to accompany you when in your free time, in your lonely, this kind of book can help you to heal the lonely and get or add the inspirations to be more inoperative.
Abstract: The herophilus the art of medicine in early alexandria that we provide for you will be ultimate to give preference. This reading book is your chosen book to accompany you when in your free time, in your lonely. This kind of book can help you to heal the lonely and get or add the inspirations to be more inoperative. Yeah, book as the widow of the world can be very inspiring manners. As here, this book is also created by an inspiring author that can make influences of you to do more.

105 citations