scispace - formally typeset
Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1007/S11618-021-01002-X

Learning during COVID-19: the role of self-regulated learning, motivation, and procrastination for perceived competence.

04 Mar 2021-Zeitschrift Fur Erziehungswissenschaft (Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden)-Vol. 24, Iss: 2, pp 1-26
Abstract: In March 2020 schools in Austria temporarily closed and switched to distance learning to contain the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19). The resulting situation posed great challenges to teachers, guardians and students (Huber and Helm 2020). Research has shown that perceived competence (Deci and Ryan 2000) affects selfregulated learning (SRL), intrinsic motivation and procrastination, however few studies have considered these variables in context of distance learning among adolescents. This study investigated differences in students who perceived themselves as high vs. low in competence with respect to these constructs. In an online questionnaire, 2652 Austrian secondary school students answered closed questions regarding SRL, intrinsic motivation and procrastination as well as open-ended questions about challenges, successes and need for support in distance. Structural equation modeling was applied for the quantitative analysis which was complemented by thematic analysis for the qualitative questions (Braun and Clarke 2006). Results showed that students who experienced themselves as highly competent use SRL strategies (goal setting and planning, time management, metacognitive strategies) more often and are more intrinsically motivated than students with lower perceived competence. They also procrastinate less. Furthermore, qualitative analysis revealed that although all students face similar challenges (e.g., independent learning, time and task management, learning on the computer, lack of contact with teachers and peers), students who perceived themselves as highly competent seemed to cope better, and have less need for support. Implications for distance learning and future research are discussed.

... read more

Topics: Self-regulated learning (58%), Procrastination (57%), Competence (human resources) (53%) ... show more
Citations
  More

17 results found


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/03004279.2021.1948091
01 Jul 2021-Education 3-13
Abstract: The COVID-19 outbreak has led to an influx of research studies focusing on the new norm of online teaching–learning in higher education. However, much less is known about how this profound shift in...

... read more

Topics: Higher education (55%)

1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1007/S10212-021-00556-Y
Abstract: The aim of this paper is to thoroughly examine how students in Serbia experienced their education through distance learning during the 2020 Spring school closures due to the pandemic. Schoolchildren’s multigenre narratives about learning during school closure were elicited by online surveys; qualitative thematic and values analyses were conducted; and data was further analysed by cluster analysis, ANOVA, and t-tests. A total of 45 lower and upper secondary school students produced 106 narratives providing 429 thought units for analysis. Altogether, 6 themes and 26 value codes were identified. They demonstrate the wide range, complexity, and nuanced positioning of students’ experiences towards the new situation, their role in it, and the role of others i.e. teachers and the technology itself. The paper draws implications on the policy and educational-psychological and methodological level.

... read more

Topics: Distance education (52%)

1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1371/JOURNAL.PONE.0251352
Julia Holzer1, Selma Korlat1, Christian Haider1, Martin Mayerhofer1  +21 moreInstitutions (13)
12 May 2021-PLOS ONE
Abstract: The sudden switch to distance education to contain the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally altered adolescents' lives around the globe. The present research aims to identify psychological characteristics that relate to adolescents' well-being in terms of positive emotion and intrinsic learning motivation, and key characteristics of their learning behavior in a situation of unplanned, involuntary distance education. Following Self-Determination Theory, experienced competence, autonomy, and relatedness were assumed to relate to active learning behavior (i.e., engagement and persistence), and negatively relate to passive learning behavior (i.e., procrastination), mediated via positive emotion and intrinsic learning motivation. Data were collected via online questionnaires in altogether eight countries from Europe, Asia, and North America (N = 25,305) and comparable results across countries were expected. Experienced competence was consistently found to relate to positive emotion and intrinsic learning motivation, and, in turn, active learning behavior in terms of engagement and persistence. The study results further highlight the role of perceived relatedness for positive emotion. The high proportions of explained variance speak in favor of taking these central results into account when designing distance education in times of COVID-19.

... read more

Topics: Passive learning (58%), Active learning (58%), Procrastination (52%)

1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1007/S10639-021-10714-W
Nina Bergdahl1, Melissa Bond2Institutions (2)
Abstract: It is well-recognised that engagement is critical for learning and school success. Engagement (and disengagement) are, however, also influenced by context. Thus, as digital technologies add complexity to the educational context, they influence classroom leadership, lesson designs and related practices, and thereby engagement. Despite being critical, engagement and disengagement are not well explored concerning these influences, with a lack of research undertaken within socially disadvantaged schools. In this qualitative study, 14 classroom observations were conducted, during five months, in twelve classes in an upper secondary school in Sweden, along with dialogues with teachers (n=12) and students (n=32). The data were analysed using thematic analysis and descriptive statistics. Identified themes include digital context, teacher leadership, engagement and disengagement. A network of relations between the (dis-)engagement compound and themes is presented. The results identified processes in which engagement shifted into disengagement and vice versa; in particular, that the intention of active learning does not automatically translate to active learning for all students, although teachers employed a higher work pace than did their students. Teacher self-efficacy and awareness of how to manage digital technologies in and outside the classroom was found to play a vital role in facilitating engagement. Understanding the (dis-)engagement compound in blended learning environments is key to inform active and visible learning for future research and supportive organisational structures.

... read more

Topics: Blended learning (61%), Active learning (58%), Teacher leadership (57%) ... show more

Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1051/E3SCONF/202127312031
01 Jan 2021-
Abstract: The present article analyzes the distance teaching didactic possibilities for foreign language educational process organization. The authors consider the main foreign languages distance teaching components and describe the “Foreign language” academic discipline characteristic features. Moreover, the authors describe the distance learning specifics, taking language disciplines subject features into account, and provide a detailed analysis of the foreign languages distance teaching process components. The importance of various interaction means between a teacher and a student in the foreign language online learning process, including e-mail, Skype, Google Docs, Zoom, Teams and Moodle platforms, is stressed. The Moodle platform application is researched on the example of the language disciplines electronic test control organization at Russian Customs Academy Rostov branch and at Don State Technical University. The interactive methods application in foreign language online teaching is described on the example of classes held in the form of chats, web classes and webinars. The article describes an experiment conducted at Don State Technical University on the project technology application within the “Project Activity Fundamentals” discipline framework in the 1st-year “Linguistics” students’ groups. As a result of the project activities, projects-presentations were prepared in English on the topic “My career opportunities in the foreign languages field” and a course module for distance learning in the “Foreign language in the professional sphere” discipline for of non-language faculties students was presented. Basing on the distance teaching components analysis and the ways of their application, the authors arrived at the conclusion that carefully selected didactic tools ensure the organization, students ’ activities regulation and their language disciplines educational material content assimilation.

... read more

Topics: Foreign language (63%), Distance education (57%), Discipline (52%)

References
  More

77 results found


Open accessBook
Jacob Cohen1Institutions (1)
01 Dec 1969-
Abstract: Contents: Prefaces. The Concepts of Power Analysis. The t-Test for Means. The Significance of a Product Moment rs (subscript s). Differences Between Correlation Coefficients. The Test That a Proportion is .50 and the Sign Test. Differences Between Proportions. Chi-Square Tests for Goodness of Fit and Contingency Tables. The Analysis of Variance and Covariance. Multiple Regression and Correlation Analysis. Set Correlation and Multivariate Methods. Some Issues in Power Analysis. Computational Procedures.

... read more

Topics: Goodness of fit (61%), Contingency table (57%), Effect size (56%) ... show more

103,911 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1191/1478088706QP063OA
Virginia Braun1, Victoria Clarke2Institutions (2)
Abstract: Thematic analysis is a poorly demarcated, rarely acknowledged, yet widely used qualitative analytic method within psychology. In this paper, we argue that it offers an accessible and theoretically flexible approach to analysing qualitative data. We outline what thematic analysis is, locating it in relation to other qualitative analytic methods that search for themes or patterns, and in relation to different epistemological and ontological positions. We then provide clear guidelines to those wanting to start thematic analysis, or conduct it in a more deliberate and rigorous way, and consider potential pitfalls in conducting thematic analysis. Finally, we outline the disadvantages and advantages of thematic analysis. We conclude by advocating thematic analysis as a useful and flexible method for qualitative research in and beyond psychology.

... read more

77,018 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/10705519909540118
Li-tze Hu, Peter M. Bentler1Institutions (1)
Abstract: This article examines the adequacy of the “rules of thumb” conventional cutoff criteria and several new alternatives for various fit indexes used to evaluate model fit in practice. Using a 2‐index presentation strategy, which includes using the maximum likelihood (ML)‐based standardized root mean squared residual (SRMR) and supplementing it with either Tucker‐Lewis Index (TLI), Bollen's (1989) Fit Index (BL89), Relative Noncentrality Index (RNI), Comparative Fit Index (CFI), Gamma Hat, McDonald's Centrality Index (Mc), or root mean squared error of approximation (RMSEA), various combinations of cutoff values from selected ranges of cutoff criteria for the ML‐based SRMR and a given supplemental fit index were used to calculate rejection rates for various types of true‐population and misspecified models; that is, models with misspecified factor covariance(s) and models with misspecified factor loading(s). The results suggest that, for the ML method, a cutoff value close to .95 for TLI, BL89, CFI, RNI, and G...

... read more

Topics: Cutoff (52%), Goodness of fit (51%)

63,509 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1207/S15327965PLI1104_01
Edward L. Deci1, Richard M. RyanInstitutions (1)
Abstract: Self-determination theory (SDT) maintains that an understanding of human motivation requires a consideration of innate psychological needs for competence, autonomy, and relatedness. We discuss the SDT concept of needs as it relates to previous need theories, emphasizing that needs specify the necessary conditions for psychological growth, integrity, and well-being. This concept of needs leads to the hypotheses that different regulatory processes underlying goal pursuits are differentially associated with effective functioning and well-being and also that different goal contents have different relations to the quality of behavior and mental health, specifically because different regulatory processes and different goal contents are associated with differing degrees of need satisfaction. Social contexts and individual differences that support satisfaction of the basic needs facilitate natural growth processes including intrinsically motivated behavior and integration of extrinsic motivations, whereas those that forestall autonomy, competence, or relatedness are associated with poorer motivation, performance, and well-being. We also discuss the relation of the psychological needs to cultural values, evolutionary processes, and other contemporary motivation theories.

... read more

Topics: Self-determination theory (64%), Need theory (58%), Goal theory (57%) ... show more

19,104 Citations