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Journal ArticleDOI

Learning Gender@@@Shards of Glass: Children Reading and Writing beyond Gendered Identities

01 Jun 1995-Educational Researcher-Vol. 24, Iss: 5, pp 31
TL;DR: In this paper, a post-structuralist theory and the study of gendered childhoods are used to identify the subjects of childhood knowledge and reading and writing a vision of femininity.
Abstract: Post-structuralist theory and the study of gendered childhoods the subjects of childhood knowledge and the subjects of reading and writing a vision of femininity? (masculine) transformations sexuality deconstructive reading writing beyond the male-female dualism.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors review the findings of their literature review of Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) in educational research and conclude that as educational researchers bring CDA frameworks into educational contexts, they are reshaping the boundaries of CDA.
Abstract: During the past decade educational researchers increasingly have turned to Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) as a set of approaches to answer questions about the relationships between language and society. In this article the authors review the findings of their literature review of CDA in educational research. The findings proceed in the following manner: the multiple ways in which CDA has been defined, the theories of language included in CDA frameworks, the relationship of CDA and context, the question of methods, and issues of reflexivity. The findings illustrate that as educational researchers bring CDA frameworks into educational contexts, they are reshaping the boundaries of CDA.

637 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Men are, however, necessarily involved in gender-equality reform as discussed by the authors, since it is women who are disadvantaged by the main patterns of gender inequality and who therefore have the claim for redress.
Abstract: E quality between women and men has been a doctrine well recognized in international law since the adoption of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations 1958), and as a principle it enjoys popular support in many countries. The idea of gender equal rights has provided the formal basis for the international discussion of the position of women since the 1975–85 UN Decade for Women, which has been a key element in the story of global feminism (Bulbeck 1988). The idea that men might have a specific role in relation to this principle has emerged only recently. The issue of gender equality was placed on the policy agenda by women. The reason is obvious: it is women who are disadvantaged by the main patterns of gender inequality and who therefore have the claim for redress. Men are, however, necessarily involved in gender-equality reform. Gender inequalities are embedded in a multidimensional structure of relationships between women and men, which, as the modern sociology of gender shows, operates at every level of human experience, from economic arrangements, culture, and the state to interpersonal relationships and individual emotions (Holter 1997; Walby 1997; Connell 2002). Moving toward a gender-equal society involves profound institutional change as well as change in everyday life and personal conduct. To move far in this

491 citations

Book
01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: In this article, the issues in feminist theory, epistemology and methodology are highlighted, and an analytical approach to gendered power differential analysis is presented, combining introductory overviews with reflections.
Abstract: Highlights the issues in feminist theory, epistemology and methodology. Combining introductory overviews with reflections, this title focuses on analytical approaches to gendered power differential ...

434 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a critique of neoliberal regimes within universities is developed and guidelines for thinking about education within (and against) neoliberal regimes are developed, and the dangers of it for intellectual work are considered.
Abstract: In this paper a critique of neoliberal regimes within universities is developed. Neoliberal discourse is deconstructed and the dangers of it for intellectual work are considered. Neoliberal subjects (those subjected through neoliberal discourses) are defined and guidelines for thinking about education within (and against) neoliberal regimes are developed.

287 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Emma Renold1
TL;DR: In this article, a year-long ethnography of children's constructions of their gender and sexual identities in two primary schools was used to examine how a minority of 10 and 11-year-old white working and middle-class boys create and seek out spaces from which they can resist, subvert and actively challenge prevailing hegemonic (heterosexual) masculinities within a peer group pupil culture which thrives on the daily policing and shaming of Other1 masculinity.
Abstract: Focusing on the experiences of boys who choose not to cultivate their masculinities through hegemonic discourses and practices, this paper seeks to empirically explore and theorize the extent to which it is possible to live out the category ‘boy’ in non‐hegemonic ways in the primary school setting. Drawing upon a year‐long ethnography of children's constructions of their gender and sexual identities in two primary schools, it examines how a minority of 10‐ and 11‐year‐old white working and middle‐class boys create and seek out spaces from which they can resist, subvert and actively challenge prevailing hegemonic (heterosexual) masculinities within a peer group pupil culture which thrives on the daily policing and shaming of Other1 masculinities. The paper attempts to theorize more fully the inter‐relationship of hegemonic and non‐hegemonic masculinities and argues that the ways in which boys inhabit and construct non‐hegemonic masculinities both subverts and reinforces hegemonic gender/sexual relations.

266 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors review the findings of their literature review of Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) in educational research and conclude that as educational researchers bring CDA frameworks into educational contexts, they are reshaping the boundaries of CDA.
Abstract: During the past decade educational researchers increasingly have turned to Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) as a set of approaches to answer questions about the relationships between language and society. In this article the authors review the findings of their literature review of CDA in educational research. The findings proceed in the following manner: the multiple ways in which CDA has been defined, the theories of language included in CDA frameworks, the relationship of CDA and context, the question of methods, and issues of reflexivity. The findings illustrate that as educational researchers bring CDA frameworks into educational contexts, they are reshaping the boundaries of CDA.

637 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Men are, however, necessarily involved in gender-equality reform as discussed by the authors, since it is women who are disadvantaged by the main patterns of gender inequality and who therefore have the claim for redress.
Abstract: E quality between women and men has been a doctrine well recognized in international law since the adoption of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations 1958), and as a principle it enjoys popular support in many countries. The idea of gender equal rights has provided the formal basis for the international discussion of the position of women since the 1975–85 UN Decade for Women, which has been a key element in the story of global feminism (Bulbeck 1988). The idea that men might have a specific role in relation to this principle has emerged only recently. The issue of gender equality was placed on the policy agenda by women. The reason is obvious: it is women who are disadvantaged by the main patterns of gender inequality and who therefore have the claim for redress. Men are, however, necessarily involved in gender-equality reform. Gender inequalities are embedded in a multidimensional structure of relationships between women and men, which, as the modern sociology of gender shows, operates at every level of human experience, from economic arrangements, culture, and the state to interpersonal relationships and individual emotions (Holter 1997; Walby 1997; Connell 2002). Moving toward a gender-equal society involves profound institutional change as well as change in everyday life and personal conduct. To move far in this

491 citations

Book
01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: In this article, the issues in feminist theory, epistemology and methodology are highlighted, and an analytical approach to gendered power differential analysis is presented, combining introductory overviews with reflections.
Abstract: Highlights the issues in feminist theory, epistemology and methodology. Combining introductory overviews with reflections, this title focuses on analytical approaches to gendered power differential ...

434 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a critique of neoliberal regimes within universities is developed and guidelines for thinking about education within (and against) neoliberal regimes are developed, and the dangers of it for intellectual work are considered.
Abstract: In this paper a critique of neoliberal regimes within universities is developed. Neoliberal discourse is deconstructed and the dangers of it for intellectual work are considered. Neoliberal subjects (those subjected through neoliberal discourses) are defined and guidelines for thinking about education within (and against) neoliberal regimes are developed.

287 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Emma Renold1
TL;DR: In this article, a year-long ethnography of children's constructions of their gender and sexual identities in two primary schools was used to examine how a minority of 10 and 11-year-old white working and middle-class boys create and seek out spaces from which they can resist, subvert and actively challenge prevailing hegemonic (heterosexual) masculinities within a peer group pupil culture which thrives on the daily policing and shaming of Other1 masculinity.
Abstract: Focusing on the experiences of boys who choose not to cultivate their masculinities through hegemonic discourses and practices, this paper seeks to empirically explore and theorize the extent to which it is possible to live out the category ‘boy’ in non‐hegemonic ways in the primary school setting. Drawing upon a year‐long ethnography of children's constructions of their gender and sexual identities in two primary schools, it examines how a minority of 10‐ and 11‐year‐old white working and middle‐class boys create and seek out spaces from which they can resist, subvert and actively challenge prevailing hegemonic (heterosexual) masculinities within a peer group pupil culture which thrives on the daily policing and shaming of Other1 masculinities. The paper attempts to theorize more fully the inter‐relationship of hegemonic and non‐hegemonic masculinities and argues that the ways in which boys inhabit and construct non‐hegemonic masculinities both subverts and reinforces hegemonic gender/sexual relations.

266 citations