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Journal ArticleDOI

Learning graphs from data: A signal representation perspective

TL;DR: In this paper, the authors survey solutions to the problem of graph learning, including classical viewpoints from statistics and physics, and more recent approaches that adopt a graph signal processing (GSP) perspective.
Abstract: The construction of a meaningful graph topology plays a crucial role in the effective representation, processing, analysis and visualization of structured data. When a natural choice of the graph is not readily available from the data sets, it is thus desirable to infer or learn a graph topology from the data. In this tutorial overview, we survey solutions to the problem of graph learning, including classical viewpoints from statistics and physics, and more recent approaches that adopt a graph signal processing (GSP) perspective. We further emphasize the conceptual similarities and differences between classical and GSP-based graph inference methods, and highlight the potential advantage of the latter in a number of theoretical and practical scenarios. We conclude with several open issues and challenges that are keys to the design of future signal processing and machine learning algorithms for learning graphs from data.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work alternately optimize the diagonal and off-diagonal entries of a Mahalanobis distance matrix and constrain the Schur complement of sub-matrix to be positive definite (PD) via linear inequalities derived from the Gershgorin circle theorem.
Abstract: Identifying an appropriate underlying graph kernel that reflects pairwise similarities is critical in many recent graph spectral signal restoration schemes, including image denoising, dequantization, and contrast enhancement. Existing graph learning algorithms compute the most likely entries of a properly defined graph Laplacian matrix $\mathbf {L}$ , but require a large number of signal observations $\mathbf {z}$ 's for a stable estimate. In this work, we assume instead the availability of a relevant feature vector $\mathbf {f}_i$ per node $i$ , from which we compute an optimal feature graph via optimization of a feature metric. Specifically, we alternately optimize the diagonal and off-diagonal entries of a Mahalanobis distance matrix $\mathbf {M}$ by minimizing the graph Laplacian regularizer (GLR) $\mathbf {z}^{\top } \mathbf {L} \mathbf {z}$ , where edge weight is $w_{i,j} = \exp \lbrace - (\mathbf {f}_i - \mathbf {f}_j)^{\top } \mathbf {M} (\mathbf {f}_i - \mathbf {f}_j) \rbrace$ , given a single observation $\mathbf {z}$ . We optimize diagonal entries via proximal gradient (PG), where we constrain $\mathbf {M}$ to be positive definite (PD) via linear inequalities derived from the Gershgorin circle theorem. To optimize off-diagonal entries, we design a block descent algorithm that iteratively optimizes one row and column of $\mathbf {M}$ . To keep $\mathbf {M}$ PD, we constrain the Schur complement of sub-matrix $\mathbf {M}_{2,2}$ of $\mathbf {M}$ to be PD when optimizing via PG. Our algorithm mitigates full eigen-decomposition of $\mathbf {M}$ , thus ensuring fast computation speed even when feature vector $\mathbf {f}_i$ has high dimension. To validate its usefulness, we apply our feature graph learning algorithm to the problem of 3D point cloud denoising, resulting in state-of-the-art performance compared to competing schemes in extensive experiments.

75 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: Differentiable Graph Module is introduced, a learnable function that predicts edge probabilities in the graph which are optimal for the downstream task which can be combined with convolutional graph neural network layers and trained in an end-to-end fashion.
Abstract: Graph deep learning has recently emerged as a powerful ML concept allowing to generalize successful deep neural architectures to non-Euclidean structured data. Such methods have shown promising results on a broad spectrum of applications ranging from social science, biomedicine, and particle physics to computer vision, graphics, and chemistry. One of the limitations of the majority of the current graph neural network architectures is that they are often restricted to the transductive setting and rely on the assumption that the underlying graph is known and fixed. In many settings, such as those arising in medical and healthcare applications, this assumption is not necessarily true since the graph may be noisy, partially- or even completely unknown, and one is thus interested in inferring it from the data. This is especially important in inductive settings when dealing with nodes not present in the graph at training time. Furthermore, sometimes such a graph itself may convey insights that are even more important than the downstream task. In this paper, we introduce Differentiable Graph Module (DGM), a learnable function predicting the edge probability in the graph relevant for the task, that can be combined with convolutional graph neural network layers and trained in an end-to-end fashion. We provide an extensive evaluation of applications from the domains of healthcare (disease prediction), brain imaging (gender and age prediction), computer graphics (3D point cloud segmentation), and computer vision (zero-shot learning). We show that our model provides a significant improvement over baselines both in transductive and inductive settings and achieves state-of-the-art results.

71 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a deep autoencoder with graph topology inference and filtering is proposed to achieve compact representations of unorganized 3D point clouds in an unsupervised manner.
Abstract: We propose a deep autoencoder with graph topology inference and filtering to achieve compact representations of unorganized 3D point clouds in an unsupervised manner. Many previous works discretize 3D points to voxels and then use lattice-based methods to process and learn 3D spatial information; however, this leads to inevitable discretization errors. In this work, we try to handle raw 3D points without such compromise. The proposed networks follow the autoencoder framework with a focus on designing the decoder. The encoder of the proposed networks adopts similar architectures as in PointNet, which is a well-acknowledged method for supervised learning of 3D point clouds. The decoder of the proposed networks involves three novel modules: the folding module, the graph-topology-inference module, and the graph-filtering module. The folding module folds a canonical 2D lattice to the underlying surface of a 3D point cloud, achieving coarse reconstruction; the graph-topology-inference module learns a graph topology to represent pairwise relationships between 3D points, pushing the latent code to preserve both coordinates and pairwise relationships of points in 3D point clouds; and the graph-filtering module couples the above two modules, refining the coarse reconstruction through a learnt graph topology to obtain the final reconstruction. The proposed decoder leverages a learnable graph topology to push the codeword to preserve representative features and further improve the unsupervised-learning performance. We further provide theoretical analyses of the proposed architecture. We provide an upper bound for the reconstruction loss and further show the superiority of graph smoothness over spatial smoothness as a prior to model 3D point clouds. In the experiments, we validate the proposed networks in three tasks, including 3D point cloud reconstruction, visualization, and transfer classification. The experimental results show that (1) the proposed networks outperform the state-of-the-art methods in various tasks, including reconstruction and transfer classification; (2) a graph topology can be inferred as auxiliary information without specific supervision on graph topology inference; (3) graph filtering refines the reconstruction, leading to better performances; and (4) designing a powerful decoder could improve the unsupervised-learning performance, just like a powerful encoder.

44 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an interpretable graph neural network framework is proposed to denoise single or multiple noisy graph signals, where the input noisy graph signal is used to supervise the networks.
Abstract: We propose an interpretable graph neural network framework to denoise single or multiple noisy graph signals. The proposed graph unrolling networks expand algorithm unrolling to the graph domain and provide an interpretation of the architecture design from a signal processing perspective. We unroll an iterative denoising algorithm by mapping each iteration into a single network layer where the feed-forward process is equivalent to iteratively denoising graph signals. We train the graph unrolling networks through unsupervised learning, where the input noisy graph signals are used to supervise the networks. By leveraging the learning ability of neural networks, we adaptively capture appropriate priors from input noisy graph signals. A core component of graph unrolling networks is the edge-weight-sharing graph convolution operation , which parameterizes each edge weight by a trainable kernel function whose trainable parameters are shared by all the edges. The proposed convolution is permutation-equivariant and can flexibly adjust the edge weights to various graph signals. We further consider two special cases of this class of networks, graph unrolling sparse coding (GUSC) and graph unrolling trend filtering (GUTF), by unrolling sparse coding and trend filtering, respectively. To validate the proposed methods, we conduct extensive experiments on both real-world datasets and simulated datasets, and demonstrate that our methods have smaller denoising errors than conventional denoising algorithms and state-of-the-art graph neural networks. For denoising a single smooth graph signal, the normalized mean square error of the proposed networks is around 40% and 60% lower than that of graph Laplacian denoising and graph wavelets, respectively.

43 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A major line of work in graph signal processing during the past 10 years has been to design new transform methods that account for the underlying graph structure to identify and exploit structure in data residing on a connected, weighted, undirected graph.
Abstract: A major line of work in graph signal processing [2] during the past 10 years has been to design new transform methods that account for the underlying graph structure to identify and exploit structure in data residing on a connected, weighted, undirected graph. The most common approach is to construct a dictionary of atoms (building block signals) and represent the graph signal of interest as a linear combination of these atoms. Such representations enable visual analysis of data, statistical analysis of data, and data compression, and they can also be leveraged as regularizers in machine learning and ill-posed inverse problems, such as inpainting, denoising, and classification.

42 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A new method for estimation in linear models called the lasso, which minimizes the residual sum of squares subject to the sum of the absolute value of the coefficients being less than a constant, is proposed.
Abstract: SUMMARY We propose a new method for estimation in linear models. The 'lasso' minimizes the residual sum of squares subject to the sum of the absolute value of the coefficients being less than a constant. Because of the nature of this constraint it tends to produce some coefficients that are exactly 0 and hence gives interpretable models. Our simulation studies suggest that the lasso enjoys some of the favourable properties of both subset selection and ridge regression. It produces interpretable models like subset selection and exhibits the stability of ridge regression. There is also an interesting relationship with recent work in adaptive function estimation by Donoho and Johnstone. The lasso idea is quite general and can be applied in a variety of statistical models: extensions to generalized regression models and tree-based models are briefly described.

40,785 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
22 Dec 2000-Science
TL;DR: Locally linear embedding (LLE) is introduced, an unsupervised learning algorithm that computes low-dimensional, neighborhood-preserving embeddings of high-dimensional inputs that learns the global structure of nonlinear manifolds.
Abstract: Many areas of science depend on exploratory data analysis and visualization. The need to analyze large amounts of multivariate data raises the fundamental problem of dimensionality reduction: how to discover compact representations of high-dimensional data. Here, we introduce locally linear embedding (LLE), an unsupervised learning algorithm that computes low-dimensional, neighborhood-preserving embeddings of high-dimensional inputs. Unlike clustering methods for local dimensionality reduction, LLE maps its inputs into a single global coordinate system of lower dimensionality, and its optimizations do not involve local minima. By exploiting the local symmetries of linear reconstructions, LLE is able to learn the global structure of nonlinear manifolds, such as those generated by images of faces or documents of text.

15,106 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A thorough exposition of community structure, or clustering, is attempted, from the definition of the main elements of the problem, to the presentation of most methods developed, with a special focus on techniques designed by statistical physicists.
Abstract: The modern science of networks has brought significant advances to our understanding of complex systems. One of the most relevant features of graphs representing real systems is community structure, or clustering, i. e. the organization of vertices in clusters, with many edges joining vertices of the same cluster and comparatively few edges joining vertices of different clusters. Such clusters, or communities, can be considered as fairly independent compartments of a graph, playing a similar role like, e. g., the tissues or the organs in the human body. Detecting communities is of great importance in sociology, biology and computer science, disciplines where systems are often represented as graphs. This problem is very hard and not yet satisfactorily solved, despite the huge effort of a large interdisciplinary community of scientists working on it over the past few years. We will attempt a thorough exposition of the topic, from the definition of the main elements of the problem, to the presentation of most methods developed, with a special focus on techniques designed by statistical physicists, from the discussion of crucial issues like the significance of clustering and how methods should be tested and compared against each other, to the description of applications to real networks.

9,057 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A thorough exposition of the main elements of the clustering problem can be found in this paper, with a special focus on techniques designed by statistical physicists, from the discussion of crucial issues like the significance of clustering and how methods should be tested and compared against each other, to the description of applications to real networks.

8,432 citations

Book
24 Aug 2012
TL;DR: This textbook offers a comprehensive and self-contained introduction to the field of machine learning, based on a unified, probabilistic approach, and is suitable for upper-level undergraduates with an introductory-level college math background and beginning graduate students.
Abstract: Today's Web-enabled deluge of electronic data calls for automated methods of data analysis. Machine learning provides these, developing methods that can automatically detect patterns in data and then use the uncovered patterns to predict future data. This textbook offers a comprehensive and self-contained introduction to the field of machine learning, based on a unified, probabilistic approach. The coverage combines breadth and depth, offering necessary background material on such topics as probability, optimization, and linear algebra as well as discussion of recent developments in the field, including conditional random fields, L1 regularization, and deep learning. The book is written in an informal, accessible style, complete with pseudo-code for the most important algorithms. All topics are copiously illustrated with color images and worked examples drawn from such application domains as biology, text processing, computer vision, and robotics. Rather than providing a cookbook of different heuristic methods, the book stresses a principled model-based approach, often using the language of graphical models to specify models in a concise and intuitive way. Almost all the models described have been implemented in a MATLAB software package--PMTK (probabilistic modeling toolkit)--that is freely available online. The book is suitable for upper-level undergraduates with an introductory-level college math background and beginning graduate students.

8,059 citations