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Journal ArticleDOI

Les violences conjugales, familiales et structurelles : vers une perspective intégrative des savoirs

TL;DR: In this paper, the authors define the notion of violence conjugale as "a social grave and persistant problem which enforces le tiers des femmes de la planete en a deja ete victime".
Abstract: La violence conjugale est un probleme social grave et persistant ; le tiers des femmes de la planete en a deja ete victime. Cet article vise a discuter des liens empiriques et theoriques entre les violences conjugales, familiales et structurelles. L’article debutera par une breve mise en contexte decrivant comment la violence conjugale s’est construite comme un probleme socio-penal au Quebec. Les principales lacunes des connaissances actuelles dans le domaine seront ensuite identifiees, demontrant ainsi la necessite de mieux comprendre les liens complexes entre les violences conjugales, familiales et structurelles, trois concepts dont les definitions pourraient s’enrichir et se completer mutuellement. Cet article soulignera l’importance de prendre en consideration les realites diversifiees auxquelles sont confrontes les acteurs concernes par ces violences (femmes, hommes et enfants), en privilegiant une analyse globale qui integre non seulement les facteurs individuels et interpersonnels, mais aussi les facteurs sociaux et structurels, notamment les oppressions liees au genre ou a d’autres marqueurs de l’identite sociale. La discussion sera enrichie par des modeles theoriques decrivant les differentes dynamiques de violences conjugales et familiales ainsi que par le feminisme intersectionnel, qui s’avere fort utile pour l’analyse des violences structurelles. La conclusion traitera des retombees potentielles d’une analyse des liens entre les violences conjugales, familiales et structurelles sur les politiques sociales et les programmes d’intervention pour les victimes, les agresseurs et les enfants exposes a la violence conjugale.

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Citations
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01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: The second cycle of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS-2003) as discussed by the authors was released in 2003, and the major findings of the second cycle were presented.
Abstract: This report presents the major findings of the second cycle of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS-2003). In this initiative, data are collected every five years on child maltreatment reported to, and investigated by, child welfare agencies in Canada. The CIS is a collaborative effort of many partners: the federal, provincial and territorial governments; university-based researchers; the First Nations Child & Family Caring Society; child advocacy groups; and most important, child welfare service providers across the country.

429 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A systematic examination of the scientific literature in several relevant databases was conducted to identify scientific articles, published between 2003 and 2013, that investigated this cooccurrence of intimate partner violence and intrafamilial child sexual abuse.

63 citations

01 Jan 1956
TL;DR: Fischer Georges as mentioned in this paper published an article entitled "The Annuaire francais de droit international, volume 2, 1956" in the journal of the Organisation des Nations Unies.
Abstract: Fischer Georges. Organisation des Nations Unies. In: Annuaire francais de droit international, volume 2, 1956. p. 520.

26 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored the race and gender dimensions of violence against women of color and found that the experiences of women of colour are often the product of intersecting patterns of racism and sexism, and how these experiences tend not to be represented within the discourse of either feminism or antiracism.
Abstract: Over the last two decades, women have organized against the almost routine violence that shapes their lives. Drawing from the strength of shared experience, women have recognized that the political demands of millions speak more powerfully than the pleas of a few isolated voices. This politicization in turn has transformed the way we understand violence against women. For example, battering and rape, once seen as private (family matters) and aberrational (errant sexual aggression), are now largely recognized as part of a broad-scale system of domination that affects women as a class. This process of recognizing as social and systemic what was formerly perceived as isolated and individual has also characterized the identity politics of people of color and gays and lesbians, among others. For all these groups, identity-based politics has been a source of strength, community, and intellectual development. The embrace of identity politics, however, has been in tension with dominant conceptions of social justice. Race, gender, and other identity categories are most often treated in mainstream liberal discourse as vestiges of bias or domination-that is, as intrinsically negative frameworks in which social power works to exclude or marginalize those who are different. According to this understanding, our liberatory objective should be to empty such categories of any social significance. Yet implicit in certain strands of feminist and racial liberation movements, for example, is the view that the social power in delineating difference need not be the power of domination; it can instead be the source of political empowerment and social reconstruction. The problem with identity politics is not that it fails to transcend difference, as some critics charge, but rather the opposite- that it frequently conflates or ignores intra group differences. In the context of violence against women, this elision of difference is problematic, fundamentally because the violence that many women experience is often shaped by other dimensions of their identities, such as race and class. Moreover, ignoring differences within groups frequently contributes to tension among groups, another problem of identity politics that frustrates efforts to politicize violence against women. Feminist efforts to politicize experiences of women and antiracist efforts to politicize experiences of people of color' have frequently proceeded as though the issues and experiences they each detail occur on mutually exclusive terrains. Al-though racism and sexism readily intersect in the lives of real people, they seldom do in feminist and antiracist practices. And so, when the practices expound identity as "woman" or "person of color" as an either/or proposition, they relegate the identity of women of color to a location that resists telling. My objective here is to advance the telling of that location by exploring the race and gender dimensions of violence against women of color. Contemporary feminist and antiracist discourses have failed to consider the intersections of racism and patriarchy. Focusing on two dimensions of male violence against women-battering and rape-I consider how the experiences of women of color are frequently the product of intersecting patterns of racism and sexism, and how these experiences tend not to be represented within the discourse of either feminism or antiracism... Language: en

15,236 citations


"Les violences conjugales, familiale..." refers background in this paper

  • ...L’émergence de la perspective intersectionnelle est inhérente aux mouvements sociaux et aux luttes féministes des femmes afro-américaines et afro-britanniques dans les années 1970 et 1980 (Crenshaw, 1991 ; Anthias et Yuval-Davis, 1983 ; Collins, 2000)....

    [...]

  • ...Ces auteures dénoncent également que l’héritage culturel, l’esclavagisme et le colonialisme ne soient guère pris en considération dans le discours féministe majoritaire, décontextualisant l’expérience des femmes racisées (Collins, 2000 ; Crenshaw, 1991)....

    [...]

01 Jan 2005
TL;DR: The authors discusses structural intersectionality, the ways in which the location of women of color at the intersection of race and gender makes their real experience of domestic violence, rape, and remedial reform qualitatively different from that of white women.
Abstract: Contemporary feminist and antiracist discourses have failed to consider the intersections of racism and patriarchy. To overcome this difficulty, an original approach is suggested here: that of intersectionality. In the first part, the paper discusses structural intersectionality, the ways in which the location of women of color at the intersection of race and gender makes their real experience of domestic violence, rape, and remedial reform qualitatively different from that of white women. The focus is shifted in the second part to political intersectionality, with the analysis of how both feminist and antiracist politics have functioned in tandem to marginalize the issue of violence against women of color. Finally, the implications of the intersectional approach are addressed within the broader scope of contemporary identity politics.

11,901 citations

Book
09 Dec 1999
TL;DR: In this article, Patricia Hill Collins explores the words and ideas of Black feminist intellectuals as well as those African-American women outside academe and provides an interpretive framework for the work of such prominent Black feminist thinkers as Angela Davis, bell hooks, Alice Walker, and Audre Lorde.
Abstract: In spite of the double burden of racial and gender discrimination, African-American women have developed a rich intellectual tradition that is not widely known. In Black Feminist Thought, Patricia Hill Collins explores the words and ideas of Black feminist intellectuals as well as those African-American women outside academe. She provides an interpretive framework for the work of such prominent Black feminist thinkers as Angela Davis, bell hooks, Alice Walker, and Audre Lorde. The result is a superbly crafted book that provides the first synthetic overview of Black feminist thought.

10,052 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

5,787 citations


"Les violences conjugales, familiale..." refers background in this paper

  • ...L’émergence de la perspective intersectionnelle est inhérente aux mouvements sociaux et aux luttes féministes des femmes afro-américaines et afro-britanniques dans les années 1970 et 1980 (Crenshaw, 1991 ; Anthias et Yuval-Davis, 1983 ; Collins, 2000)....

    [...]

  • ...Ces auteures dénoncent également que l’héritage culturel, l’esclavagisme et le colonialisme ne soient guère pris en considération dans le discours féministe majoritaire, décontextualisant l’expérience des femmes racisées (Collins, 2000 ; Crenshaw, 1991)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors explored various analytical issues involved in conceptualizing the interrelationships of gender, class, race and ethnicity and other social divisions, and compared the debate on these issues that took place in Britain in the 1980s and around the 2001 UN World Conference Against Racism.
Abstract: This article explores various analytical issues involved in conceptualizing the interrelationships of gender, class, race and ethnicity and other social divisions. It compares the debate on these issues that took place in Britain in the 1980s and around the 2001 UN World Conference Against Racism. It examines issues such as the relative helpfulness of additive or mutually constitutive models of intersectional social divisions; the different analytical levels at which social divisions need to be studied, their ontological base and their relations to each other. The final section of the article attempts critically to assess a specific intersectional methodological approach for engaging in aid and human rights work in the South.

1,909 citations


"Les violences conjugales, familiale..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Selon cette approche, les interactions multiples et dynamiques entre les différents processus d’identification sociale produisent des expériences spécifiques d’oppression et de privilège (Anthias, 2013 ; Damant et al., 2008 ; Bilge, 2009 ; Oxman-Martinez et al., 2002 ; Yuval-Davis, 2006)....

    [...]