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Journal ArticleDOI

Letter and Image

22 Jan 1972-Leonardo (The MIT Press)-Vol. 5, Iss: 3, pp 273-274
About: This article is published in Leonardo.The article was published on 1972-01-22. It has received 10 citations till now.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A "media actors" software architecture is developed used in conjunction with real-time computer-vision-based body tracking and gesture recognition techniques to choreograph digital media together with human performers or museum visitors.
Abstract: The future of artistic and expressive communication in the varied forms of film, theater, dance, and narrative tends toward a blend of real and imaginary worlds in which moving images, graphics, and text cooperate with humans and among themselves in the transmission of a message. We have developed a "media actors" software architecture used in conjunction with real-time computer-vision-based body tracking and gesture recognition techniques to choreograph digital media together with human performers or museum visitors. We endow media objects with coordinated perceptual intelligence, behaviors, personality, and intentionality. Such media actors are able to engage the public in an encounter with virtual characters that express themselves through one or more of these agents. We show applications to dance, theater, and the circus, which augment the traditional performance stage with images, video, music, and text, and are able to respond to movement and gesture in believable, aesthetical, and expressive manners. We also describe applications to interactive museum exhibit design that exploit the media actors' perceptual abilities while they interact with the public.

130 citations

01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a 3.3-approximation algorithm for the 3.1-GHz bandit-16.3 GHz frequency bandit model, and
Abstract: 3

54 citations

01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: Applications to dance and theater which augment the traditional performance stage with images, video, music, text, able to respond to movement and gesture in believable, esthetical, and expressive manners are shown.
Abstract: This paper describes motivations and techniques to extend the expressive grammar of dance and theatrical performances. We first give an outline of previous work in performance, which has inspired our research, and explain how our technology can contribute along historical directions of exploration. We then present real-time computer vision based body tracking and gesture recognition techniques which is used in conjunction with a Media Actors software architecture to choreograph digital media together with human performers. We show applications to dance and theater which augment the traditional performance stage with images, video, music, text, able to respond to movement and gesture in believable, esthetical, and expressive manners. Finally, we describe a scenario and work in progress, which allow us to apply our artistic and technological advances to street performance.

46 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The court of Common Pleas was one of the most important courts in the English legal system for more than 600 years, until its abolition by Act of Parliament in 1873.
Abstract: The court of Common Pleas was one of the most important courts in the English legal system for more than 600 years, until its abolition by Act of Parliament in 1873. The cases heard before this royal court were civil disputes between the king’s subjects, often relating to land, inheritance and debts. The purpose of this paper is to introduce readers to the ornament and imagery that appeared on the headings of the main records of the court of Common Pleas between 1422 and 1509 and to explore the origins and contemporary context of the images and representations employed by the clerk-artists who wrote and decorated these headings. The decoration they chose ranged from simple ornament to representations of plants, birds, animals and people. Great emphasis was placed on the role of the sovereign as the fount of justice, and this emphasis was reinforced by the incorporation of words and phrases, acclamations and verses from the Psalms chosen to underline the majesty and power of successive monarchs. The illustrations provide an important insight into the art, history and politics of late fifteenth-century England.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In recent years, many of our own artists, literary as well as visual, have explored the potentials of the intermedia sound poetry, the happening, concrete and postconcrete poetry, and so on-and, in due course, attention has been given to earlier intermedial works, suggesting a fairly widespread taste for such forms at present as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: From roughly the eighteenth century until the 1970s, pattern poetry, that is, poetry in which a visual image is formed by the placement of words or letters, when it received any attention at all, was strongly under attack by almost all critics and observers. This was not because of its mimesis, since until the early twentieth century most visual art was itself mimetic. Rather, the feeling was that the pattern poem was intermedial, that it lay conceptually between the literary and visual art media, and that it was therefore unable to stand on its own and was thus inherently mediocre. In recent years, however, many of our own artists, literary as well as visual, have explored the potentials of the intermedia-sound poetry, the happening, concrete and postconcrete poetry, and so on-and, in due course, attention has been given to earlier intermedial works, suggesting a fairly widespread taste for such forms at present. Emblem poetry, previously ignored or denigrated by most observers up to the 1950s, was reevaluated by Mario Praz (1964) and others in the 1960s and since (see, e.g., Hatherly 1983 and Pozzi 1981). The same appears to be happening with pattern poetry. Just to describe the situation in the United States, when I wrote a little monograph on George Herbert's pattern poems (Higgins 1977), I could find almost nothing on pattern poetry as such in Englisha chapter here or there (Hollander 1975), but nothing substantial. A little book by Kenneth Newell (1976) had been published, but by an extremely obscure press; it was unlisted in the usual sources, and I knew of it only later when I found a copy of it in the New York Pub-

4 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A "media actors" software architecture is developed used in conjunction with real-time computer-vision-based body tracking and gesture recognition techniques to choreograph digital media together with human performers or museum visitors.
Abstract: The future of artistic and expressive communication in the varied forms of film, theater, dance, and narrative tends toward a blend of real and imaginary worlds in which moving images, graphics, and text cooperate with humans and among themselves in the transmission of a message. We have developed a "media actors" software architecture used in conjunction with real-time computer-vision-based body tracking and gesture recognition techniques to choreograph digital media together with human performers or museum visitors. We endow media objects with coordinated perceptual intelligence, behaviors, personality, and intentionality. Such media actors are able to engage the public in an encounter with virtual characters that express themselves through one or more of these agents. We show applications to dance, theater, and the circus, which augment the traditional performance stage with images, video, music, and text, and are able to respond to movement and gesture in believable, aesthetical, and expressive manners. We also describe applications to interactive museum exhibit design that exploit the media actors' perceptual abilities while they interact with the public.

130 citations

01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a 3.3-approximation algorithm for the 3.1-GHz bandit-16.3 GHz frequency bandit model, and
Abstract: 3

54 citations

01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: Applications to dance and theater which augment the traditional performance stage with images, video, music, text, able to respond to movement and gesture in believable, esthetical, and expressive manners are shown.
Abstract: This paper describes motivations and techniques to extend the expressive grammar of dance and theatrical performances. We first give an outline of previous work in performance, which has inspired our research, and explain how our technology can contribute along historical directions of exploration. We then present real-time computer vision based body tracking and gesture recognition techniques which is used in conjunction with a Media Actors software architecture to choreograph digital media together with human performers. We show applications to dance and theater which augment the traditional performance stage with images, video, music, text, able to respond to movement and gesture in believable, esthetical, and expressive manners. Finally, we describe a scenario and work in progress, which allow us to apply our artistic and technological advances to street performance.

46 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The court of Common Pleas was one of the most important courts in the English legal system for more than 600 years, until its abolition by Act of Parliament in 1873.
Abstract: The court of Common Pleas was one of the most important courts in the English legal system for more than 600 years, until its abolition by Act of Parliament in 1873. The cases heard before this royal court were civil disputes between the king’s subjects, often relating to land, inheritance and debts. The purpose of this paper is to introduce readers to the ornament and imagery that appeared on the headings of the main records of the court of Common Pleas between 1422 and 1509 and to explore the origins and contemporary context of the images and representations employed by the clerk-artists who wrote and decorated these headings. The decoration they chose ranged from simple ornament to representations of plants, birds, animals and people. Great emphasis was placed on the role of the sovereign as the fount of justice, and this emphasis was reinforced by the incorporation of words and phrases, acclamations and verses from the Psalms chosen to underline the majesty and power of successive monarchs. The illustrations provide an important insight into the art, history and politics of late fifteenth-century England.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In recent years, many of our own artists, literary as well as visual, have explored the potentials of the intermedia sound poetry, the happening, concrete and postconcrete poetry, and so on-and, in due course, attention has been given to earlier intermedial works, suggesting a fairly widespread taste for such forms at present as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: From roughly the eighteenth century until the 1970s, pattern poetry, that is, poetry in which a visual image is formed by the placement of words or letters, when it received any attention at all, was strongly under attack by almost all critics and observers. This was not because of its mimesis, since until the early twentieth century most visual art was itself mimetic. Rather, the feeling was that the pattern poem was intermedial, that it lay conceptually between the literary and visual art media, and that it was therefore unable to stand on its own and was thus inherently mediocre. In recent years, however, many of our own artists, literary as well as visual, have explored the potentials of the intermedia-sound poetry, the happening, concrete and postconcrete poetry, and so on-and, in due course, attention has been given to earlier intermedial works, suggesting a fairly widespread taste for such forms at present. Emblem poetry, previously ignored or denigrated by most observers up to the 1950s, was reevaluated by Mario Praz (1964) and others in the 1960s and since (see, e.g., Hatherly 1983 and Pozzi 1981). The same appears to be happening with pattern poetry. Just to describe the situation in the United States, when I wrote a little monograph on George Herbert's pattern poems (Higgins 1977), I could find almost nothing on pattern poetry as such in Englisha chapter here or there (Hollander 1975), but nothing substantial. A little book by Kenneth Newell (1976) had been published, but by an extremely obscure press; it was unlisted in the usual sources, and I knew of it only later when I found a copy of it in the New York Pub-

4 citations