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Dissertation

"Licit Magic": The Touch And Sight Of Islamic Talismanic Scrolls

06 Jun 2014-
TL;DR: The production and history of the talismanic scroll as a medium through a Fatimid, Ayyubid, and Mamluk historical periods is discussed in this paper.
Abstract: The following study traces the production and history of the talismanic scroll as a medium through a Fatimid, Ayyubid, and Mamluk historical periods. My dissertation understands the protocol of manufacturing and utilizing talismanic scrolls. The dissertation is a study of the Qur’an, prayers and illustrations of these talismanic works. I begin by investigating a theory of the occult the medieval primary sources of the Neo-platonic tenth century Ikhwān al-Ṣafāʾ and al-Bunī (d.1225). I establish that talismans are generally categorized as science (‘ilm). Next, a dynastic spotlight of talismanic scrolls creates a chronological framework for the dissertation. The Fatimid talismanic scrolls and the Ayyubid pilgrimage scrolls are both block-printed and are placed within the larger conceptual framework of pilgrimage and devotion. The two unpublished Mamluk scrolls from Dar Al-Athar Al-Islamiyyah are long beautiful handwritten scrolls that provide a perspective on how the occult is part of the daily life of the practitioner in the medieval Islamic culture. Through an in depth analysis of the written word and images, I establish that textually and visually there is a template for the creation of these sophisticated scrolls. Lastly, I discuss the efficacy of these scrolls, I use theories of linguistic anthropology and return to the Islamic primary sources to establish that there is a language of the occult and there are people that practiced the occult. The word of God and the Qurʾān empower the scrolls I studied. As for the people who practiced the occult, I turn to the tenth century Ibn al-Nadim and
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1959
TL;DR: In what case do you like reading so much? What about the type of the the muqaddimah an introduction to history book? The needs to read? Well, everybody has their own reason why should read some books.
Abstract: In what case do you like reading so much? What about the type of the the muqaddimah an introduction to history book? The needs to read? Well, everybody has their own reason why should read some books. Mostly, it will relate to their necessity to get knowledge from the book and want to read just to get entertainment. Novels, story book, and other entertaining books become so popular this day. Besides, the scientific books will also be the best reason to choose, especially for the students, teachers, doctors, businessman, and other professions who are fond of reading.

389 citations

01 Jan 2002

296 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The earliest history of paper can be traced to 2,000 years ago, when it was invented in China as mentioned in this paper, and it entered the Islamic lands of West Asia and North Africa, and how it spread to northern Europe, and the impact of paper on the development of writing, books, mathematics, music, art, architecture, and even cooking.
Abstract: Like the printing press, typewriter, and computer, paper has been a crucial agent for the dissemination of information. This engaging book presents an important new chapter in paper's history: how its use in Islamic lands during the Middle Ages influenced almost every aspect of medieval life. Focusing on the spread of paper from the early eighth century, when Muslims in West Asia acquired Chinese knowledge of paper and papermaking, to five centuries later, when they transmitted this knowledge to Christians in Spain and Sicily, the book reveals how paper utterly transformed the passing of knowledge and served as a bridge between cultures. Jonathan Bloom traces the earliest history of paper - how it was invented in China over 2,000 years ago, how it entered the Islamic lands of West Asia and North Africa, and how it spread to northern Europe. He explores the impact of paper on the development of writing, books, mathematics, music, art, architecture, and even cooking. And he discusses why Europe was so quick to adopt paper from the Islamic lands and why the Islamic lands were so slow to accept printing in return. Together the beautifully written text and delightful illustrations of papermaking techniques and the many uses to which paper was put give new lustre and importance to a now-humble material.

106 citations

References
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MonographDOI
TL;DR: Gutas as mentioned in this paper explores the major social, political and ideological factors that occasioned the unprecedented translation movement from Greek into Arabic in Baghdad, the newly founded capital of the Arab dynasty of the 'Abbasids', during the first two centuries of their rule.
Abstract: From the middle of the eighth century to the tenth century, almost all non-literary and non-historical secular Greek books, including such diverse topics as astrology, alchemy, physics, botany and medicine, that were not available throughout the eastern Byzantine Empire and the Near East, were translated into Arabic. Greek Thought, Arabic Culture explores the major social, political and ideological factors that occasioned the unprecedented translation movement from Greek into Arabic in Baghdad, the newly founded capital of the Arab dynasty of the 'Abbasids', during the first two centuries of their rule. Dimitri Gutas draws upon the preceding historical and philological scholarship in Greco-Arabic studies and the study of medieval translations of secular Greek works into Arabic and analyses the social and historical reasons for this phenomenon. Dimitri Gutas provides a stimulating, erudite and well-documented survey of this key movement in the transmission of ancient Greek culture to the Middle Ages.

565 citations

Book
01 Jun 1956
TL;DR: Ginzberg's "The Legends of the Jews" as mentioned in this paper is a collection of the many elaborations and embellishments of biblical stories that flourished in the centuries following the Bible's own creation.
Abstract: The first books of the Bible describe powerfully but briefly the creation, the first generations of humanity, and the early history of the Jews. In addition to their power to inspire thought and worship, they inspired imagination. Much of the richness of Jewish belief and wisdom comes from the many legends that answered questions raised by the silences of the Bible. From the second to the 14th centuries, the Talmud, Midrash, and their targums incorporated apocryphal views of biblical persons and events to help explain scripture. Other legends found their way into the Kabbalah, into biblical commentaries, and into Christian literature. Now available in paperback, Louis Ginzberg's landma "The legends of the Jews" assembles the many elaborations and embellishments of biblical stories that flourished in the centuries following the Bible's own creation. From a portrait of Adam and Eve as innocent cannibals to tales of Moses ascending the throne of Ethiopia and visiting both hell and paradise, these legends offer strange, delightful and occasionally bizarre variations of familiar biblical stories. Other tales describe Eden and the building of the Tower explain how the first Sabbath was celebrated, and chronicle the punishment of the rebel angels. Ginzberg devotes most of his life to gathering these Jewish legends from their original sources - written in Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Syrian, Aramaic, Ethiopic, Arabic, Persian, and Old Slavic - and reproducing them completely, accurately, and vividly. He presents these legends following the traditional bi and reconciling the sometimes contradictory versions of the same stories found in different sources. In addition to four volumes of the legends themselves, "The the Jews" includes two indispensable volumes of notes that provides the sources for every legend and test to the immense depth and range of Ginzberg's research, as well as a comprehensive index to the people, places, and motifs found in the legends and their sources.

418 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1959
TL;DR: In what case do you like reading so much? What about the type of the the muqaddimah an introduction to history book? The needs to read? Well, everybody has their own reason why should read some books.
Abstract: In what case do you like reading so much? What about the type of the the muqaddimah an introduction to history book? The needs to read? Well, everybody has their own reason why should read some books. Mostly, it will relate to their necessity to get knowledge from the book and want to read just to get entertainment. Novels, story book, and other entertaining books become so popular this day. Besides, the scientific books will also be the best reason to choose, especially for the students, teachers, doctors, businessman, and other professions who are fond of reading.

389 citations

Book
01 Jan 1863
TL;DR: For the first time, the Islamic Texts Society has, with no loss whatsoever of clarity or legibility, brought together the eight large volumes into two compact volumes; it is now possible to keep the Lexicon on the work desk and refer to it with ease.
Abstract: The most scholarly dictionary of the Arabic language available. This work is the product of over thirty years of unrelenting labour. It is a work of such unique greatness that, since its first appearance almost 150 years ago, it has remained to this day supreme in the field of Arabic lexicography. No scholar or group of scholars has produced anything to supplant it. As it originally appeared and was later reproduced, the Lexicon consisted of eight large, cumbersome volumes, which made it difficult to use. Now, for the first time, the Islamic Texts Society has, with no loss whatsoever of clarity or legibility, brought together the eight large volumes into two compact volumes; it is now possible to keep the Lexicon on the work desk and refer to it with ease. Set of two volumes.

386 citations