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Journal ArticleDOI

Linking core self-evaluation and emotional exhaustion with workplace loneliness: does high LMX make the consequence worse?

31 May 2021-International Journal of Human Resource Management (Routledge)-Vol. 32, Iss: 10, pp 2124-2149

AbstractWorkplace loneliness has an adverse effect on both the employees and the organizations. Despite it being a pervasive issue, workplace loneliness has received scant attention in the domain of human ...

Topics: Loneliness (64%), Emotional exhaustion (58%), Core self-evaluations (51%)

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: In this paper, we take stock of what The International Journal of Human Resource Management (IJHRM) has achieved in the past 30 years since its inception in 1990. By analyzing the publication trend...

10 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is suggested that workplace loneliness can be reduced when managers exchange more information and communicate more frequently with their nurses and when nurses trust their leaders and find their work meaningful.
Abstract: Aim This study examined a model investigating how social interaction variables (leader-member exchange (interactions between managers and nurses), trust, and communication frequency) and work meaningfulness influence nurses' experiences of workplace loneliness. Background As workplace loneliness can result in lower job satisfaction and a decrease in workers' health, understanding the contributing factors to loneliness at work is important. Method In this cross-sectional study, Turkish nurses (N = 864) completed self-report scales measuring social exchange between leaders and members, trust in leaders, communication frequency, work meaningfulness, and loneliness. To avoid fatigue and method variance influence, scales were completed over two testing times (separated by a month). Results Workplace loneliness was associated with less social interaction with leaders (lower leader-member exchange and frequency of communication), less trust in leaders, and lower reports of meaningful work. Conclusion The results suggest that workplace loneliness can be reduced when managers exchange more information and communicate more frequently with their nurses. Workplace loneliness is also reduced when nurses trust their leaders and find their work meaningful. Implications for nursing management Managers supervising nurses need to be aware that workplace loneliness occurs and that their interactions and relationships with the nurses will have an impact on experienced workplace loneliness.

7 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Developing and testing a conceptual model that highlights how COVID-related stressors frustrate employees' need for belonging and negatively impacting worker well-being and helping behaviors through work loneliness, and examining the buffering role of self-compassion in this process.
Abstract: The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has transformed the way we work, with many employees working under isolating and difficult conditions. However, research on the antecedents, consequences, and buffers of work loneliness is scarce. Integrating research on need for belonging, regulatory loop models of loneliness, and self-compassion, the current study addresses this critical issue by developing and testing a conceptual model that highlights how COVID-related stressors frustrate employees' need for belonging (i.e., telecommuting frequency, job insecurity, and a lack of COVID-related informational justice), negatively impacting worker well-being (i.e., depression) and helping behaviors [i.e., organizational citizenship behavior (OCB)] through work loneliness. Furthermore, we examine the buffering role of self-compassion in this process. Results from a weekly diary study of U.S. employees conducted over 2 months during the initial stage of the pandemic provide support for the mediating role of work loneliness in relations between all three proposed antecedents and both outcomes. In addition, self-compassion mitigated the positive within-person relationship between work loneliness and employee depression, indicating that more self-compassionate employees were better able to cope with their feelings of work loneliness. Although self-compassion also moderated the within-person relationship between work loneliness and OCB, this interaction was different in form from our prediction. Implications for enhancing employee well-being and helping behaviors during and beyond the pandemic are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: This paper examines the detrimental effects of perceived knowledge hiding (KH) on loneliness and affective commitment within academic settings It further investigates the influence of conscientiousness as a moderator,Using the cross-sectional survey methodology, the proposed moderated mediation model has empirically tested the effect of perceived KH on a sample of 300 students pursuing management education at a premier institute in India,The findings reveal that perceived KH affects the affective commitment of students toward the institution via loneliness Moreover, conscientiousness moderates the mediating role of loneliness in a way that the relationship becomes strong with low levels of conscientiousness,This study contributes to the literature of KH by empirically investigating its detrimental consequences It further investigates the impact of personality moderator on the proposed relationships The discussed framework is an early attempt to understand the phenomenon of KH among students, primarily from the perspective of a knowledge seeker,Awareness about the ill effects of the knowledge-hiding (KH) behavior of students and understanding the role of personality in this will help administrators in designing effective interventions for curbing the same,Effective control of KH behavior will restrain its ill effects among management students (future workforce), thereby conserving societal resources spent on health and education,Empirical studies testing the direct and indirect consequences of KH are limited; hence, this study attempts to fill the gap

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Given its detrimental implications for employees’ well-being and work performance, this paper seeks to understand how workplace loneliness occurs by focusing on a job-related antecedent, job autonomy. Drawing on role identity theory and situational strength theory, the purpose of this paper is to propose that job autonomy relates to workplace loneliness via perceived insider status, a process moderated by perceived clan culture.,A two-wave survey served to collect data from 430 knowledge workers in 17 enterprises from several major cities in Eastern China.,Job autonomy relates to workplace loneliness via the mediation of perceived insider status. Specifically, job autonomy impacts positively on perceived insider status, which further reduces workplace loneliness. Besides, the relationship between perceived insider status and workplace loneliness is conditional on perceived clan culture – perceived insider status decreases workplace loneliness more effectively in the case of higher perceived clan culture. Furthermore, perceived clan culture moderates the mediating effect of perceived insider status.,This paper is among the few attempts to offer a comprehensive framework in which job and organizational characteristics combine to explain workplace loneliness. Moreover, the findings illustrate that perceived insider status and perceived clan culture complement each other in alleviating workplace loneliness.

5 citations


References
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Journal ArticleDOI
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TL;DR: The extent to which method biases influence behavioral research results is examined, potential sources of method biases are identified, the cognitive processes through which method bias influence responses to measures are discussed, the many different procedural and statistical techniques that can be used to control method biases is evaluated, and recommendations for how to select appropriate procedural and Statistical remedies are provided.
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35,437 citations


"Linking core self-evaluation and em..." refers background or methods in this paper

  • ...We draw our argument based on the approach/avoidance theory (Elliot, 1999; Roth & Cohen, 1986) and the coping literature (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984)....

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  • ...Coping refers to ‘constantly changing cognitive and behavioural efforts to manage specific external and/or internal demands that are appraised as taxing or exceeding the resources of the person’ (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984, p. 141)....

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  • ...Appraisal of threat activates avoidance-focused coping (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984; Weinstein, Brown, & Ryan, 2009) and appraisal of opportunity activates approach-focused coping (Nicholls & Polman, 2007; Park, Armeli, & Tennen, 2004)....

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Abstract: Introduction Interactions between Continuous Predictors in Multiple Regression The Effects of Predictor Scaling on Coefficients of Regression Equations Testing and Probing Three-Way Interactions Structuring Regression Equations to Reflect Higher Order Relationships Model and Effect Testing with Higher Order Terms Interactions between Categorical and Continuous Variables Reliability and Statistical Power Conclusion Some Contrasts Between ANOVA and MR in Practice

27,846 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An overview of simple and multiple mediation is provided and three approaches that can be used to investigate indirect processes, as well as methods for contrasting two or more mediators within a single model are explored.
Abstract: Hypotheses involving mediation are common in the behavioral sciences. Mediation exists when a predictor affects a dependent variable indirectly through at least one intervening variable, or mediator. Methods to assess mediation involving multiple simultaneous mediators have received little attention in the methodological literature despite a clear need. We provide an overview of simple and multiple mediation and explore three approaches that can be used to investigate indirect processes, as well as methods for contrasting two or more mediators within a single model. We present an illustrative example, assessing and contrasting potential mediators of the relationship between the helpfulness of socialization agents and job satisfaction. We also provide SAS and SPSS macros, as well as Mplus and LISREL syntax, to facilitate the use of these methods in applications.

22,179 citations


"Linking core self-evaluation and em..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...We tested the mediation role of workplace loneliness using the bootstrapping technique following the suggestions of Preacher and Hayes (2008)....

    [...]