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Literature and Environment

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TLDR
In the early 1990s, the ecocriticism movement emerged as a loosely coordinated movement whose contributions thus far have been most visible within its home discipline of literature but whose interests and alliances extend across various art forms and media as discussed by the authors.
Abstract
Since prehistory, literature and the arts have been drawn to portrayals of physical environments and human-environment interactions. The modern environmentalist movement as it emerged first in the late-nineteenth century and, in its more recent incarnation, in the 1960s, gave rise to a rich array of fictional and nonfictional writings concerned with humans' changing relationship to the natural world. Only since the early 1990s, however, has the long-standing interest of literature studies in these matters generated the initiative most commonly known as “ecocriticism,” an eclectic and loosely coordinated movement whose contributions thus far have been most visible within its home discipline of literature but whose interests and alliances extend across various art forms and media. In such areas as the study of narrative and image, ecocriticism converges with its sister disciplines in the humanities: environmental anthropology, environmental history, and environmental philosophy. In the first two sections, w...

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Journal ArticleDOI

Wisdom Sits in Places: Landscape and Language among the Western Apache.

TL;DR: Wisdom Sits in Places: Landscape and Language among the Western Apache by Keith H. Basso as discussed by the authors was published by Albuquerque University of New Mexico Press, 1996. 171 pp.
Book ChapterDOI

The Nature of (in) Cities

TL;DR: In this paper, an advertisement appeared in the real estate section of the Washington Post 1 promoting a new development: "The NICE THING about the city is that it eventually ends" (emphasis in original).
Journal ArticleDOI

Against Extinction. The Story of Conservation

TL;DR: Dunmire and Tierney as discussed by the authors described the arrival and impact of plants that the Europeans brought to the New World and the history of these plants and their introduction to the modern world.
Journal ArticleDOI

The Land before Her: Fantasy and Experience of the American Frontiers, 1630-1860.

Nina Baym, +1 more
- 01 Oct 1984 - 
TL;DR: Kolodny examines the evidence of three generations of women's writing about the frontier and finds that, although the American frontiersman imagined the wilderness as virgin land, an unspoiled Eve to be taken, the pioneer woman at his side dreamed more modestly of a garden to be cultivated as mentioned in this paper.
References
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Book

The Country and the City

TL;DR: As a brilliant survey of English literature in terms of changing attitudes towards country and city, Williams' highly-acclaimed study reveals the shifting images and associations between these two traditional poles of life throughout the major developmental periods of English culture.
Book

When Species Meet

TL;DR: When Species Meet as discussed by the authors explores philosophical, cultural, and biological aspects of animal-human encounters and finds that respect, curiosity, and knowledge spring from animal and human associations and work powerfully against ideas about human exceptionalism.
Book

World Risk Society

TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present the Cosmopolitan Manifesto of the World Risk Society as Cosmopolitan Society and the risk society Revisited: Theory, Politics, Critiques and Research Programmes.
Journal ArticleDOI

The shallow and the deep, long‐range ecology movement. A summary∗

TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the principles of diversity, complexity, autonomy, decentralization, symbiosis, egalitarianism, and classlessness of ecology responsible policies, which are concerned only in part with pollution and resource depletion.
Book

The Companion Species Manifesto : Dogs, People, and Significant Otherness

Donna Haraway
TL;DR: The Companion Species Manifesto as discussed by the authors is about the implosion of nature and culture in the joint lives of dogs and people, who are bonded in significant otherness, in all their historical complexity, Donna Haraway tells us, dogs are not surrogates for theory, she says; they are not here just to think with.