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Journal ArticleDOI

Making a New Deal: Industrial Workers in Chicago, 1919-1939.

01 Sep 1991-The American Historical Review-Vol. 78, Iss: 2, pp 1307
TL;DR: Workers make a New Deal as discussed by the authors, becoming a union rank and file, encountering mass culture and competing loyalty at the workplace, and finding common ground in workers' common ground Conclusion.
Abstract: Preface Introduction 1. Living and working in Chicago in 1919 2. Ethnicity in the New Era 3. Encountering mass culture 4. Contested loyalty at the workplace 5. Adrift in the Great Depression 6. Workers make a New Deal 7. Becoming a union rank and file 8. Workers' common ground Conclusion.
Citations
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01 Jan 2017

115 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...69 WPT Income statement, Women’s Pro Tour Income 1972-1973 folder [no number], Box 22, Gladys Heldman Collection, Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; Philadelphia -$50,000.00 W.I.T.F. financial statements, Folder [no number], Box 22, Gladys Heldman Collection, Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; Women’s International Tennis Federation Cash Basis statement, Women’s International Tennis Federation Financials Folder [no number], Box 22, Gladys Heldman Collection, Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; Kathleen Kemper to Gladys Heldman, no date, WPT Receipts – 1973 folder [no number], Box 22, Gladys Heldman Collection, Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; World Tennis/Women’s International Tennis Federation Expenses Incurred by Julius D. Heldman and Not Otherwise Reimbursed, February, 1973, Bank Account – WITF (1973) folder [no number], Box 22, Gladys Heldman Collection, Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; April 1973 Disbursements statement, Bank Account – WITF (1973) folder [no number], Box 22, Gladys Heldman Collection, Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; Sanction for San Francisco and Los Angeles Tournaments $2,000 deposit slip, Women’s Pro Tour Deposits 1971-1973 Folder [no number], Box 22, Gladys Heldman Collection, Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; Women’s Pro – Tour Income Statement – 1972, Women’s Pro Tour Deposits 1971-1973 Folder [no number], Box 22, Gladys Heldman Collection, Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; Gladys Heldman to George Weissman, February 7, 1974, no folder, Box 8, Gladys Heldman Papers, Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; Gladys Heldman to George Weissman, February 7, 1974, no folder, Box 8, Gladys Heldman Papers, Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas; Women’s Pro Tour Financials 1/1/73 to 4/25/73 folder [no number], Box 22, Gladys Heldman Collection, Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas....

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Proceedings ArticleDOI
11 May 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors proposed a method to improve the quality of the data collected by the data collection system by using the information gathered from the database of the user's profile.
Abstract: Вперше для території помірного екологічного ризику та зануреної частини кристалічного фундаменту отримані дані про структурний і функціональний розподіл радонового геогенічного потенціалу. Отримані результати можуть бути покладені в основу при плануванні подальших радонових програм, у тому числі і моніторингу за спостереженнями еквівалентної рівноважної об'ємної активності радону (і торону). Аналіз факторно-просторової компоненти геогенічного радонового потенціалу відповідає лінійній моделі і має декілька вкладених моделей з відмінними просторовими розмірами. Найбільші просторові розмірності: більше 150 км найпевніше пов’язуються з кліматичними чинником і більше 5 км з поширеністю різних типів грунту. Більш дрібні просторові кластери описуються характеристиками геоморфологічно-ландшафтної будови території. Універсальність моделі відповідає речовинній складовій геогенічного потенціалу - автохтонному вмісту радію в частинках грунту. Цінність геогенічного прогнозування, що виконане за допомогою геостатистичних методів. Це у свою чергу, дасть можливість більш коректно виконувати масові вимірювання рівнів радону в повітрі приміщень і грунті, закладати моніторингові точки спостережень, в областям з високими дозовими навантаженнями планувати ресурси до проведення радіологічних вимірювань і захисних заходів.

95 citations

DissertationDOI
01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: Gorby et al. as discussed by the authors studied Polish immigrants working in the steel industry in the Upper Ohio Valley from the mid-nineteenth century to the early 1930s, and found that Polish immigrants were marginalized by ethnic and regional differences, and their response and the increasing inter-ethnic interactions helped provide the background for the union organizing drives of the 1930s.
Abstract: Saints, Sinners, and Socialists on the Southside: Polish Catholic Immigrant Workers, Politics, and Culture in Wheeling, West Virginia, 1890-1930 William Hal Gorby In the years after the Civil War, Wheeling, West Virginia developed into a major manufacturing center in the Northern Panhandle. Until 1885, Wheeling was the state capital of West Virginia and was the center of cut nail production in America. The city already possessed a large population of Irish and German immigrants. However, with the decline of the nail industry and the transition to steel manufacturing in the Upper Ohio Valley, by the 1890’s, Wheeling attracted many immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe. These immigrants took their places at the bottom of the industrial hierarchy and were relegated to the most menial unskilled jobs in the steel mills, coal mines, tobacco works, and glass factories of the Wheeling District. These “new immigrants,” especially the Poles, left a world where it was becoming difficult to persist on the land. Poles began looking across the continent for higher wages. Making seasonal labor trips to the industrial core areas of Western Germany and the factories around growing cities like Warsaw and Lublin, Polish peasants also embarked more permanently to America. While settling in many of the United States’ largest cities, a sizable number arrived in Wheeling. Here they lived in the heart of the city’s factory district, and after 1900 also the center of the vice district. Often neglected and despised by city leaders and even the local labor movement, Poles were left to create their own life in Wheeling. Arriving in Wheeling, Polish peasants had to form a self-sustaining ethnic community if they were going to survive. This was difficult since Polish immigrants were divided by ethnic and regional differences. By 1900, Wheeling’s Polish immigrants began to form their community through the grass roots efforts of an active laity and their young priest Father Emil Musial. They built the parish of St. Ladislaus in the heart of South Wheeling. Ethnic community formation allowed for the creation of popular ethnic spaces, cultural events, and a strong Polish Catholic education. Through a mixture of religious piety and cultural nationalism, the community’s parish, social halls, and homes allowed the Poles to develop a distinct identity, promoted a strong family economy, while still living amidst a mixture of other immigrant groups. World War I and the subsequent decade were vital for the community. While supporting the American war effort offered proof of the Poles’ own loyalty in the minds of the native born majority, the post-war strikes in the local steel industry led to much animosity and surveillance of the Polish community. However, the era witnessed the beginnings of the Poles working with other Catholic immigrant groups, the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston, and within the labor movement. However, the success of the Wheeling Steel Corporation in busting the steelworkers union forced Poles to look inward again at their community. This also came as fears grew about the relationship of the second generation to those who remained tied to the old parish and ethnic Polonia world. The community’s response and the increasing inter-ethnic interactions helped provide the background for the union organizing drives of the 1930’s.

60 citations

References
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Book
05 Nov 2011
TL;DR: Carbon Democracy as discussed by the authors argues that no nation escapes the political consequences of our collective dependence on oil, and argues that the oil-based forms of modern democratic politics have become unsustainable, while governments everywhere appear incapable of addressing the crises that threaten to end the age of carbon democracy.
Abstract: Oil is a curse, it is often said, that condemns the countries producing it to an existence defined by war, corruption and enormous inequality. Carbon Democracy tells a more complex story, arguing that no nation escapes the political consequences of our collective dependence on oil. It shapes the body politic both in regions such as the Middle East, which rely upon revenues from oil production, and in the places that have the greatest demand for energy. Timothy Mitchell begins with the history of coal power to tell a radical new story about the rise of democracy. Coal was a source of energy so open to disruption that oligarchies in the West became vulnerable for the first time to mass demands for democracy. In the mid-twentieth century, however, the development of cheap and abundant energy from oil, most notably from the Middle East, offered a means to reduce this vulnerability to democratic pressures. The abundance of oil made it possible for the first time in history to reorganize political life around the management of something now called "the economy" and the promise of its infinite growth. The politics of the West became dependent on an undemocratic Middle East.In the twenty-first century, the oil-based forms of modern democratic politics have become unsustainable. Foreign intervention and military rule are faltering in the Middle East, while governments everywhere appear incapable of addressing the crises that threaten to end the age of carbon democracy - the disappearance of cheap energy and the carbon-fuelled collapse of the ecological order. In making the production of energy the central force shaping the democratic age, Carbon Democracy rethinks the history of energy, the politics of nature, the theory of democracy, and the place of the Middle East in our common world.

1,028 citations

01 Jan 2007
TL;DR: The Oxford Handbook of Human Resource Management (OHRM) as discussed by the authors provides an authoritative account of current trends and developments in HRM, including core processes and functions, patterns and dynamics, and measurement and outcomes.
Abstract: HRM is central to management teaching and research, and has emerged in the last decade as a significant field from its earlier roots in personnel management, industrial relations, and industrial psychology. People management and high performance teams have become key functions and goals for managers at all levels in organisations. The Oxford Handbook of Human Resource Management brings together leading scholars from around the world, and from a range of disciplines, to provide an authoritative account of current trends and developments. The book is divided into four parts: 1. Foundations and frameworks; 2. Core processes and functions; 3. Patterns and dynamics; 4. Measurement and outcomes. Overall it provides an essential resource for anybody who wants to get to grips with current thinking, research and development on HRM.

552 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the definition of voluntary associations and the principal impetus for associational activities among immigrant newcomers using examples from specific types of organisation (secret societies, credit associations, mutual benefit societies, religious groups, hometown associations, political groups) and examine the factors that shape immigrants' formal sociability.
Abstract: Drawing on the international literature on migration and immigrant associations, mainly in the context of North and South America, but also including several other global immigration contexts, this essay highlights several main questions and issues. It discusses the definition of voluntary associations and the principal impetus for associational activities among immigrant newcomers. Using examples from specific types of organisation (secret societies, credit associations, mutual benefit societies, religious groups, hometown associations, political groups), it examines the factors that shape immigrants’ formal sociability. The paper then addresses the class and gender composition of memberships, compares the associative practices of the mostly European immigrants of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries with the mostly Asian, Latin American and African arrivals of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, and discusses the issue of state involvement. The essay approaches the topic from a ...

319 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The idea of building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border was first proposed by Donald Trump in the early 1970s as discussed by the authors, who suggested that late 20th century immigration patterns have been perceived by some who consider themselves American natives because they were born in the country (even though their ancestors are of European stock) as threatening to soften the glue that preserves their vision of the right and true American culture.
Abstract: Apparently, protecting the hallowed ground of the nation-building story of American history from threatening forces prompted state policymakers to legislate its protection. Such a move provoked yet another in a decades-old raft of reactions, accusations, and criticisms from across the political spectrum.1 Why all the fuss, a reasonable observer might ask, and to what end? This, of course, is itself a historical question. And of course, an answer would beg a response that includes a multitude of causes. In this review, I attempt to address the question in a series of broad but also specific strokes. I begin by suggesting that in the United States, for example, late 20th century immigration patterns have been perceived by some who consider themselves American natives because they were born in the country (even though their ancestors are of European stock) as threatening to soften the glue that preserves their vision of the right and true American culture. In 2006, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated that there were approximately 34.3 million foreign-born persons (largely from Mexico) living in a country of 300 million people, or about 11.4% of the U.S. population. Contrast that with 1967, when there were 200 million people in the United States, of whom only 4.8% (9.7 million) were foreign born (largely from Italy). Recently, the idea about erecting a giant wall along the U.S.-Mexico border—ostensibly

246 citations

01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: This form is used for documenting property groups relating to one or several historic contexts as well as other similar forms used in the past for documenting properties in similar contexts.
Abstract: This form is used for documenting property groups relating to one or several historic contexts. See instructions in National Register Bulletin How to Complete the Multiple Property Documentation Form (formerly 16B). Complete each item by entering the requested information. For additional space, use continuation sheets (Form 10-900-a). Use a typewriter, word processor, or computer to complete all items

172 citations