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Book ChapterDOI

Marx’s Theory of Rent: A ‘Speculative’ Reading

01 Jan 2019-pp 153-170
TL;DR: In this article, the authors retrace the trajectory of the theory of rent in Marx's exposition of capitalism by focusing on the status of land as a "commodity without value" (not produced by labour) within this framework.
Abstract: Marx’s theory of rent as presented in the Third Volume of Capital has been a well-researched area in the history of political economy but not many of these studies discuss the theory with respect to the exposition of the labour theory of value and primitive accumulation in the First Volume. In this backdrop, the chapter attempts to retrace the trajectory of the theory of rent in Marx’s exposition of capitalism by focusing on the status of land as a ‘commodity without value’ (not produced by labour) within this framework. By critically engaging with the writings of David Harvey and Enrique Dussel, the chapter also explores the methodological innovation in the deployment of ‘rent’ within a value-based interpretation of the capitalist mode of production and the productive ambiguity in positing the distinction between rent and interest in a capitalist society, especially in terms of competition and return on ‘fictitious capital’.
References
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Book
01 Jan 1982
TL;DR: The Limits to Capital as mentioned in this paper is a theory of capital that links a general Marxian theory of financial and geographical crises with the incredible turmoil now being experienced in world markets, and provides one of the best theoretical guides to the contradictory forms found in the historical and geographical dynamics of capitalist development.
Abstract: On its first appearance in 1982, David Harvey's "Limits to Capital" was described in "Monthly Review" as 'a unique and insightful theory of capital', and praised in Environment and Planning as 'a magnificent achievement, [one of] the most complete, readable, lucid and least partisan exegesis, critique and extension of Marx's mature political economy available.' This new edition links a general Marxian theory of financial and geographical crises with the incredible turmoil now being experienced in world markets. In his analyses of 'fictitious capital' and 'uneven geographical development, ' Harvey takes the reader step by step through layers of crisis formation, beginning with Marx's controversial argument concerning the falling rate of profit, moving through crises of credit and finance, and closing with a timely analysis of geo-political and geographical considerations. Recently referred to by Fredric Jameson in "New Left Review" as a 'magisterial work, ' "The Limits to Capital" provides one of the best theoretical guides to the contradictory forms found in the historical and geographical dynamics of capitalist development.

2,764 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a critique of the popular idea that land can be usefully conceptualised as a 'fictitious' form of capital or commodity is presented, based primarily on a close and critical consideration of the grounds on which the identifiers and theorists of such fictitiousness distinguished it from real variants.
Abstract: With the aim of helping to revivify a stalled geographical literature on the place of land in capitalist political economies, this article presents a critique of the popular idea that land can be usefully conceptualised as a ‘fictitious’ form of capital or commodity. The critique is based primarily on a close and critical consideration of the grounds on which the identifiers and theorists of such fictitiousness – Marx/Harvey in the case of capital, Polanyi in the case of the commodity – distinguished it from ‘real’ variants. Those grounds, the article argues, are tenuous. And, far from disabling us, treating land as no more or less real than other forms of capital and commodity can empower us in productively revisiting and centring the question of land's political economy – a crucial undertaking in a world where the materiality of land to social relations is writ increasingly large.

66 citations

BookDOI
01 Nov 2015
TL;DR: Fuchs and Fisher as mentioned in this paper argue for an Inclusive approach to Cultural Labour in the digital age, arguing for an inclusive approach to cultural labour in the context of social media platforms.
Abstract: 1. Introduction: Value and Labour in the Digital Age Christian Fuchs and Eran Fisher 2. The Digital Labour Theory of Value and Karl Marx in the Age of Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and Weibo Christian Fuchs 3. The Hands and Brains of Digital Culture. Arguments for an Inclusive Approach to Cultural Labour Marisol Sandoval PART I: LABOUR AND CLASS 4. A Contribution to a Critique of the Concept Playbour Arwid Lund 5. Marx in Chinese Online Space: Some Thoughts on the Labour Problem in Chinese Internet industries Bingqing Xia PART II: THE LABOUR OF INTERNET USERS 6. The Exploitation of Audience Labour: A Missing Perspective on Communication and Capital in the Digital Era Brice Nixon 7. Audience Labour on Social Media: Learning from Sponsored Stories Eran Fisher 8. Advertising on Social Media: The Reality behind the Ideology of 'Free Access'. The Case of Chinese Social Media Platforms Yuqi Na PART III: RENT AND THE COMMONS 9. Mapping Approaches to User Participation and Digital Labour: A Critical Perspective Thomas Allmer, Sebastian Sevignani, Jernej Prodnik 10. Is the Concept of Rent Relevant to a Discussion of Surplus Value in the Digital World? Olivier Fraysse 11. The Demise of the Marxian Law of Value? A Critique of Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri Jakob Rigi PART IV: PRODUCTIVITY IN REPRODUCTION 12. Devaluing Binaries: Marxist Feminism and the Value of Consumer Labour Kylie Jarrett 13. The Concept of the Subsumption of Labour under Capital: Life Subsumption in Cognitive-Biocapitalism Andrea Fumagalli 14. Form-Giving Fire: Creative Industries as Marx's 'Work of Combustion' and the Distinction between Productive and Unproductive Labour Frederick H. Pitts

45 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In this article, the production process of capital is discussed, from exteriority to totality, and money becomes capital: from outside to inside, from outsideity to totality, in the Central Notebooks of 'Chapter III': the Production Process of Capital.
Abstract: Part I: The Central Notebooks of 'Chapter III': The Production Process of Capital 1. Money Becomes Capital: From Exteriority to Totality 2. Absolute Surplus-Value 3. Relative Surplus Value Part II: Critical Confrontation of the Entire Categorical System 4. Critical Confrontation with Steuart and the Physiocrats 5. Adam Smith's Perplexities 6. Productive Labour 7. The Theory of Rent 8. Surplus Value, Profit, Accumulation and Crisis in Ricardo 9. The Fetishism of Vulgar and Apologetic Economics Part III: New Discoveries 10. Towards 'Chapter II' and 'Chapter III' 11. New Precisions for 'Chapter I' Part IV: The New Transition 12. The Manuscripts of 1861-63 and the Philosophy of Liberation 13. The Manuscripts of 1861-63 and the 'Concept' of Dependency

31 citations