scispace - formally typeset
SciSpace - Your AI assistant to discover and understand research papers | Product Hunt

Journal ArticleDOI

Measuring clinically significant outcomes - LDQ, CORE-10 and SSQ as dimension measures of addiction.

01 Jun 2014-Psychiatric Bulletin (Royal College of Psychiatrists)-Vol. 38, Iss: 3, pp 112-115

TL;DR: Values for reliable change and clinically significant change for the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire and Social Satisfaction Questionnaire are determined and add to the evidence for the performance of the LDQ, CORE-10 and SSQ as dimension measures of addiction.

AbstractAims and method To determine values for reliable change and clinically significant change for the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ) and Social Satisfaction Questionnaire (SSQ). The performance of these two measures with the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE-10) as three dimension measures of addiction was then explored. Results The reliable change statistic for both LDQ and SSQ was ⩾4; the cut-offs for clinically significant change were LDQ ⩽10 males, ⩽5 females, and SSQ ⩾16. There was no overlap of 95% CIs for means by gender between 'well-functioning' and pre- and post-treatment populations. Clinical implications These data enable the measurement of clinically significant change using the LDQ and SSQ and add to the evidence for the performance of the LDQ, CORE-10 and SSQ as dimension measures of addiction. The CORE-10 and SSQ can be used as treatment outcome measures for mental health problems other than addiction.

...read more

Content maybe subject to copyright    Report

Citations
More filters


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Measuring outcomes in economic evaluations of social care interventions is challenging because both health and well-being benefits are evident. The ICEpop CAPability instrument for adults (ICECAP-A) and the five-level EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D-5L) are measures potentially suitable for the economic evaluation of treatments for substance use disorders. Evidence for their validity in this context is, however, lacking. OBJECTIVES: To assess the construct validity of the ICECAP-A and the EQ-5D-5L in terms of convergent and discriminative validity and sensitivity to change on the basis of standard clinical measures (Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure, Treatment Outcomes Profile, Interpersonal Support Evaluation List, Leeds Dependence Questionnaire, and Social Satisfaction Questionnaire). METHODS: A secondary analysis of pilot trial data for heroin users in opiate substitution treatment was conducted. Baseline convergence with clinical measures was assessed using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Discriminative validity was assessed using one-way analysis of variance and stepwise regressions. Sensitivity to changes in clinical indicators was assessed at 3 and 12 months using the standardized response mean statistic and parametric and nonparametric testing. RESULTS: Both measures had the same level of construct validity, except for clinical indicators of well-being, for which the ICECAP-A performed better. The ICECAP-A was sensitive to changes in both health and well-being indicators. The EQ-5D-5L had lower levels of sensitivity to change, and a ceiling effect (27%), particularly evident in the dimensions of self-care (89%), mobility (75%), and usual activities (72%). CONCLUSIONS: The findings support the construct validity of both measures, but the ICECAP-A gives more attention to broader impacts and is more sensitive to change. The ICECAP-A shows promise in evaluating treatments for substance use disorders for which recovery is the desired outcome.

27 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Investigation of the views of service users, family and friends on what constitutes a good outcome for the treatment of substance misuse problems found significant weight was placed, by both SUs and their family andFriends, on abstinence and ways of maintaining abstinence.
Abstract: Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the views of service users (SUs), family and friends on what constitutes a good outcome for the treatment of substance misuse problems.Methods: Six focus groups were arranged to explore and identify important elements of good outcome. Transcripts of the focus groups were analysed using thematic analysis. The content of the main theme, good outcome, was cross checked with SUs and the four authors. The main theme was analysed further into sub-themes.Findings: Participants were 24 SUs and 12 family and friend members recruited from specialist drug and alcohol services. The participants represented a broad range of treatment journey experiences in a variety of treatment modalities. A total of 20 outcome elements were elicited and categorised into seven sub-themes: abstinence, health, activities, relationships, social circumstances, self-awareness and wellbeing of family and friends.Conclusions: The focus of this study was on the ideal outcome rather than intermed...

13 citations


Cites background from "Measuring clinically significant ou..."

  • ...These approaches all have in common the idea that an individual’s wellbeing is defined by a number of constructs and outcome is, therefore, a compilation of related but independent measures (Raistrick et al., 2014)....

    [...]


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Factor analysis of treatment outcomes from a UK specialist addiction service: Relationship between the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire, Social Satisfaction Questionnaire and 10-item Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation found social satisfaction appears to be a unique construct of addiction.
Abstract: Introduction and Aims To examine the relationship between three outcome measures used by a specialist addiction service (UK): the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ), the Social Satisfaction Questionnaire (SSQ) and the 10-item Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE-10). Design and Method A clinical sample of 715 service user records was extracted from a specialist addiction service (2011) database. The LDQ (dependence), SSQ (social satisfaction) and CORE-10 (psychological distress) were routinely administered at the start of treatment and again between 3 and 12 months post-treatment. A mixed pre/post-treatment dataset of 526 service users was subjected to exploratory factor analysis. Parallel Analysis and the Hull method were used to suggest the most parsimonious factor solution. Results Exploratory factor analysis with three factors accounted for 66.2% of the total variance but Parallel Analysis supported two factors as sufficient to account for observed correlations among items. In the two-factor solution, LDQ items and nine of the 10 CORE-10 items loaded on the first factor >0.41, and the SSQ items on factor 2 with loadings >0.63. A two dimensional summary appears sufficient and clinically meaningful. Discussion and Conclusions Among specialist addiction service users, social satisfaction appears to be a unique construct of addiction and is not the same as variation due to psychological distress or dependence. Our interpretation of the findings is that dependence is best thought of as a specific psychological condition subsumed under the construct psychological distress. [Fairhurst C, Bohnke JR, Gabe R, Croudace TJ, Tober G, Raistrick D. Factor analysis of treatment outcomes from a UK specialist addiction service: Relationship between the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire, Social Satisfaction Questionnaire and 10-item Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation. Drug Alcohol Rev 2014;33:643–650]

8 citations


Cites background or methods from "Measuring clinically significant ou..."

  • ...The scales described here are brief enough for routine use, can be embedded with other measures and they produce clinically meaningful data [17]....

    [...]

  • ...The development of the scales as a package [16] and the measurement of outcomes in a large clinical sample [17] have been described elsewhere....

    [...]


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Aims: (i) To quantify support across five stakeholder groups for 20 recovery indicators previously generated from focus groups of service users and concerned others and (ii) To create a brief recovery questionnaire. Methods: Indicators were rated by stakeholders for their overall importance and the three most important ranked. The factor structure was determined by principal component analysis. Findings: The initial 20 recovery indicators covered the spectrum of substance misuse, social and psychological domains. Positive endorsement of each indicator by stakeholder group ranged from 53% to 74% of the maximum support possible with stronger support from service users and concerned others than from practitioners and commissioners. The greatest number of individuals in each stakeholder group, from 86% of combined problem drinkers and drug takers to 36% of specialist practitioners, rated abstinence as the single most important aspect of recovery and well-being was rated second most important. The indi...

3 citations


Cites background from "Measuring clinically significant ou..."

  • ...To illustrate: a package of treatment outcome scales (Fairhurst et al., 2014; Raistrick et al., 2014), measuring dependence, psychological well-being and social satisfaction, is capable of generating sophisticated outcomes data, which paints a meaningful picture for practitioners, albeit, interpretation requires some clinical knowledge....

    [...]

  • ...To illustrate: a package of treatment outcome scales (Fairhurst et al., 2014; Raistrick et al., 2014), measuring dependence, psychological well-being and social satisfaction, is capable of generating sophisticated outcomes data, which paints a meaningful picture for practitioners, albeit,…...

    [...]


References
More filters

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: In 1984, Jacobson, Follette, and Revenstorf defined clinically significant change as the extent to which therapy moves someone outside the range of the dysfunctional population or within the range of the functional population. In the present article, ways of operationalizing this definition are described, and examples are used to show how clients can be categorized on the basis of this definition. A reliable change index (RC) is also proposed to determine whether the magnitude of change for a given client is statistically reliable. The inclusion of the RC leads to a twofold criterion for clinically significant change.

7,062 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: This research highlights the need to understand more fully the rationale behind the continued use of these devices, as well as the barriers to their adoption.
Abstract: s. Outcome research 249 Questionnaire 63,152 Would pick up refer-

1,574 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: To use evidence regarding both costs and outcomes of primary THR to model how much more effective newer prostheses must be to justify higher costs.
Abstract: Objectives- T identify the literature on primary total hip replacement(THR) surgery that is relevant to the question of whether prostheses differ in their medium to longer term outcomes, and to synthesise this evidence. To use evidence regarding both costs and outcomes of primary THR to model how much more effective newer prostheses must be to justify higher costs

1,054 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article summarizes and scrutinizes the growth of the development of clinically relevant and psychometrically sound approaches for determining the clinical significance of treatment effects in mental health research by tracing its evolution, by examining modifications in the method, and by discussing representative applications.
Abstract: This article summarizes and scrutinizes the growth of the development of clinically relevant and psychometrically sound approaches for determining the clinical significance of treatment effects in mental health research by tracing its evolution, by examining modifications in the method, and by discussing representative applications. Future directions for this methodology are proposed.

781 citations



Related Papers (5)