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Journal ArticleDOI

Memory, History, and the Holocaust: Notes on the Problem of Representation of the Past

01 Jan 2004-Vol. 8, Iss: 1, pp 189-210
About: The article was published on 2004-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 2 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Representation (systemics).
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Dissertation
03 Apr 2012

8 citations


Cites background from "Memory, History, and the Holocaust:..."

  • ...Further, relational connections are built upon practices of shared history and memory (Ortiz, 2010) passed on orally in stories, teachings, ceremonies (Ellerby, 2005) and in writing (Brant, 1994; Womack, 1999a)....

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  • ...Through these deeds and daily practices, one’s role in a community is created and bound to the whole in reciprocity and responsibility (Ortiz, 2010)....

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  • ...Responsibility and reciprocity are acted out in community roles, contributions and connections in relation to the whole (Kovach, 2009; Ortiz, 2010)....

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  • ...Ortiz (2010) also speaks to the importance of territory or land base in maintaining a sense of identity, community and culture....

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  • ...(Ortiz, 2010) passed on orally in stories, teachings, ceremonies (Ellerby, 2005) and in writing (Brant, 1994; Womack, 1999a)....

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References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper argued that there is nothing intrinsically "individual" about such concepts as repression and working-through, and pointed out that these concepts refer to processes that always involve modes of interaction, mutual reinforcement, conflict, censorship, orientation toward others and their relative individual or collective status should not be prejudged.
Abstract: My basic premise in this paper is that the fundamental concepts of psychoanalysis (such as transference, resistance, denial, repression, acting out and worlting-through) undercut the binary opposition between the individual and society and that their application to individual or collective phenomena is a matter of informed argument and research. Freud developed these concepts in a clinical context and thought they applied to collective processes only through analogy, and a recurrent concern is how it is possible to extend them to collectivities. I believe that this concern, both in Freud and others, is based on mistaken individualistic ideological assumptions and gives rise to misguided questions. One should rather call into question the very idea that one is working with a more or less flimsy analogy between the individual and society and argue instead that there is nothing intrinsically "individual" about such concepts as repression and working-through. These concepts refer to processes that always involve modes of interaction, mutual reinforcement, conflict, censorship, orientation toward others, and so forth, and their relative individual or collective status should not be prejudged.1 Mourning may obviously take collective forms, for example, in rituals. Lieux de memoire (in Pierre Nora's phrase) may be lieux de trauma as well as commemorative sites, and the question is whether and how they may become lieux de deuil for working through traumatic events. But to what extent are modern sites (for example, memorials and museums) viable in making mourning possible? Can mourning be

28 citations