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Journal ArticleDOI

Metascience: A Paradigm for Postgraduate Communication Design Research

01 Dec 2012-Vol. 2, Iss: 1, pp 30-51
TL;DR: This paper proposes the adoption of a holistic approach—metascience—to enhance and structure postgraduate communication design research, which would help to narrow the gap between academia and professional practice.
Abstract: Communication design research is becoming an essential component in solving current design problems and tackling new design challenges. However, the notion of a scientific approach to communication...
Citations
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31 Dec 2012
TL;DR: McKenney, S. as discussed by the authors presented an invited lecture for the Crossfield Graduate School at the University of St. Gallen, St.Gallen, Switzerland, 2012, 4-5 September.
Abstract: McKenney, S. (2012, 4-5 September). What is educational design research? Invited lecture for the Crossfield Graduate School at the University of St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland.

640 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that, in response to emerging societal, technology, and other global transformations, nine interrelated changes in the landscape of design are having an impact on design education in four principal areas: design practice, teaching arena, students, and pedagogy.

13 citations

Dissertation
01 May 2017
TL;DR: The role of communication design in social innovation for sustainability is discussed in this article, where a practical tool and context for collaborative practice called communications assembly is developed and tested to support these initiatives to co-create communication design that amplifies their qualities that characterise the sustainability of their activities.
Abstract: The role of communication design in social innovation for sustainability is the central subject of this thesis. This significant yet under-explored area is the focus of study through practice-led design research. Two current paradigms underpin this study. First, the definition of communication design as an expanded practice that goes beyond visual communication to include communicating through interaction and experiences, as a practice that facilitates complex social exchange and constructs meaning in the world, whether by expert or non-expert designers. Second, the recent discussion in the area of design for sustainability focusing on the ‘qualities’ displayed by initiatives of social-environmental purpose. These qualities are perceivable and cultivated through the interaction and experience of those who take part. The conjunction of these two paradigms locate the following research questions: What are the distinct roles of communication design practice in social innovation for sustainability? How can communication design practice expand on the social and relational nature of these initiatives? How might the qualities of sustainability be cultivated through the process and products of communication design? These questions were pursued through practice-led research in the sub-context of sustainable food initiatives as an established and growing area of social innovation. The methodology applied was iterative and collaborative, working with 17 sustainable food initiatives. Through a series of 6 workshops a practical tool was developed and tested to support these initiatives to co-create communication design that amplifies their qualities that characterise the sustainability of their activities, using their existing assets. The research contributes to the discipline of communication design and the field of social innovation for sustainability, with a new tool and context for collaborative practice titled communications assembly.

8 citations


Cites background from "Metascience: A Paradigm for Postgra..."

  • ...37 - DISCOVER STAGE: CONTExTUAL REVIEW have recently explored the potential of new structures and methodologies for communication design research towards sustainability and social innovation (Davis, 2008) (Armstrong, 2011) (Bennett, 2012) (Pontis, 2012) (Poggenpohl, 2013)....

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  • ...Communication design as a facilitator and mediator of social exchange and change informs the exploration of exactly how communication design fulfils this role and contributes to this process (Davis, 2012) (Pontis, 2012) (Poggenpohl, & Winkler, 2010)....

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  • ...have recently explored the potential of new structures and methodologies for communication design research towards sustainability and social innovation (Davis, 2008) (Armstrong, 2011) (Bennett, 2012) (Pontis, 2012) (Poggenpohl, 2013)....

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Dissertation
01 Jan 2010
TL;DR: This practice-led thesis reviews the precision of information categorisation in 209 network diagrams collected from UK and Danish science textbooks and reveals how design decisions may inluence the occurrence of inefective graphic tactics.
Abstract: Network diagrams of ecological cycles, eg, carbon and nitrogen cycles, are a common feature in science textbooks for 14-18 years age groups. From an information design perspective these diagrams raise a particularly interesting challenge; that of categorising up to six types of biological information using two graphic syntactic roles – nodes and connecting arrows – whilst ensuring an efective and unambiguous message. This practice-led thesis reviews the precision of information categorisation in 209 network diagrams collected from UK and Danish science textbooks (1935-2009). Visual content analysis and graphic syntax theory (Engelhardt, 2002) is applied to review the existing information categorisation in relation to four types of graphic inefectiveness: 1) implicit nodes, 2) imprecise relative spatial positioning of graphic objects, 3) polysemy, and 4) inconsistent visual attributes or verbal syntax. This review finds 29 types of ineffective graphic tactics, which may result in ambiguous messages due to illogical linking sequences, implicit circulating elements, and confusion about chemical transfer and transformations. Based on these analysis indings, the design process in educational publishing is investigated. This identifies the rationale informing the transformation of information into network diagrams, based on semi- structured interviews with 19 editors, authors, designers, and illustrators in six publishing houses (3 in UK , 3 in Denmark). The rationale is mapped using phenomenographic analysis method and existing theories on the design process, namely brief development and translation stages (Crilly, 2005), choice points and the problem setting process (Schon, 2006), problem- solution co-evolution (Dorst and Cross, 2001), and design constraints (Lawson, 2006). The curriculum purpose of the ecological cycle network diagram is found to tightly constrain the identiied rationale and the graphic decision-making based mainly on tacit knowledge. In a final discussion the research indings are integrated by identifying models of design activities (Dumas and Mintzberg, 1993) present in investigated professional practice. This reveals how design decisions may inluence the occurrence of inefective graphic tactics. Recommendations for alternative information transformation strategies are then presented, centred on integrating graphic syntax knowledge into the current processes. These recommendations are anchored in suggestions by the interviewed participants.

1 citations

References
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Book
01 Oct 1984
TL;DR: In this article, buku ini mencakup lebih dari 50 studi kasus, memberikan perhatian untuk analisis kuantitatif, membahas lebah lengkap penggunaan desain metode campuran penelitian, and termasuk wawasan metodologi baru.
Abstract: Buku ini menyediakan sebuah portal lengkap untuk dunia penelitian studi kasus, buku ini menawarkan cakupan yang luas dari desain dan penggunaan metode studi kasus sebagai alat penelitian yang valid. Dalam buku ini mencakup lebih dari 50 studi kasus, memberikan perhatian untuk analisis kuantitatif, membahas lebih lengkap penggunaan desain metode campuran penelitian, dan termasuk wawasan metodologi baru.

78,012 citations

Book
12 Oct 2017
TL;DR: The Discovery of Grounded Theory as mentioned in this paper is a book about the discovery of grounded theories from data, both substantive and formal, which is a major task confronting sociologists and is understandable to both experts and laymen.
Abstract: Most writing on sociological method has been concerned with how accurate facts can be obtained and how theory can thereby be more rigorously tested. In The Discovery of Grounded Theory, Barney Glaser and Anselm Strauss address the equally Important enterprise of how the discovery of theory from data--systematically obtained and analyzed in social research--can be furthered. The discovery of theory from data--grounded theory--is a major task confronting sociology, for such a theory fits empirical situations, and is understandable to sociologists and laymen alike. Most important, it provides relevant predictions, explanations, interpretations, and applications. In Part I of the book, "Generation Theory by Comparative Analysis," the authors present a strategy whereby sociologists can facilitate the discovery of grounded theory, both substantive and formal. This strategy involves the systematic choice and study of several comparison groups. In Part II, The Flexible Use of Data," the generation of theory from qualitative, especially documentary, and quantitative data Is considered. In Part III, "Implications of Grounded Theory," Glaser and Strauss examine the credibility of grounded theory. The Discovery of Grounded Theory is directed toward improving social scientists' capacity for generating theory that will be relevant to their research. While aimed primarily at sociologists, it will be useful to anyone Interested In studying social phenomena--political, educational, economic, industrial-- especially If their studies are based on qualitative data.

53,267 citations

Book
27 Jul 1994
TL;DR: A Phenomenological Analysis of Human Science Research Phenomenology and Human Science Inquiry Intentionality, Noema and Noesis Epoche as discussed by the authors, Phenomenologically Reduction, Imaginative Variation and Synthesis Methods and Procedures for Conducting Human science Research Analyses and Examples.
Abstract: Human Science Perspectives and Models Transcendental Phenomenology Conceptual Framework Phenomenology and Human Science Inquiry Intentionality, Noema and Noesis Epoche, Phenomenological Reduction, Imaginative Variation and Synthesis Methods and Procedures for Conducting Human Science Research Phenomenological Research Analyses and Examples Summary, Implications and Outcomes A Phenomenological Analysis

12,709 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present experiments and generalized Causal inference methods for single and multiple studies, using both control groups and pretest observations on the outcome of the experiment, and a critical assessment of their assumptions.
Abstract: 1. Experiments and Generalized Causal Inference 2. Statistical Conclusion Validity and Internal Validity 3. Construct Validity and External Validity 4. Quasi-Experimental Designs That Either Lack a Control Group or Lack Pretest Observations on the Outcome 5. Quasi-Experimental Designs That Use Both Control Groups and Pretests 6. Quasi-Experimentation: Interrupted Time Series Designs 7. Regression Discontinuity Designs 8. Randomized Experiments: Rationale, Designs, and Conditions Conducive to Doing Them 9. Practical Problems 1: Ethics, Participant Recruitment, and Random Assignment 10. Practical Problems 2: Treatment Implementation and Attrition 11. Generalized Causal Inference: A Grounded Theory 12. Generalized Causal Inference: Methods for Single Studies 13. Generalized Causal Inference: Methods for Multiple Studies 14. A Critical Assessment of Our Assumptions

12,215 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The objective is to describe the performance of design-science research in Information Systems via a concise conceptual framework and clear guidelines for understanding, executing, and evaluating the research.
Abstract: Two paradigms characterize much of the research in the Information Systems discipline: behavioral science and design science The behavioral-science paradigm seeks to develop and verify theories that explain or predict human or organizational behavior The design-science paradigm seeks to extend the boundaries of human and organizational capabilities by creating new and innovative artifacts Both paradigms are foundational to the IS discipline, positioned as it is at the confluence of people, organizations, and technology Our objective is to describe the performance of design-science research in Information Systems via a concise conceptual framework and clear guidelines for understanding, executing, and evaluating the research In the design-science paradigm, knowledge and understanding of a problem domain and its solution are achieved in the building and application of the designed artifact Three recent exemplars in the research literature are used to demonstrate the application of these guidelines We conclude with an analysis of the challenges of performing high-quality design-science research in the context of the broader IS community

10,264 citations


"Metascience: A Paradigm for Postgra..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Case study 2: Guidelines for assessment The work of Hevner et al. (2004) resents a set of seven guidelines that can be followed to structure and assess design research....

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  • ...As an example, there is still “confusion and controversy” (Cross, 2002) over the nature of valid results (Hevner et al., 2004) and the definition of research methods (Owen, 1998; Phillips in van den Akker et al., 2006)....

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  • ...…marketing, engineering, technology, social sciences and communication—are frequently involved in planning and development stages, becoming indispensable components of the Table 1: Set of guidelines to measure design research quality (from Hevner et al., 2004) modern problem-solving process....

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  • ...…of them should be addressed in some manner for design-science research to be complete”, state Hevner et al. They may be combined with “creative skills and judgment to determine when, where, and how to apply each of the guidelines in a specific research project” (Hevner et al., 2004:82) (Table 1)....

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  • ...…research Design research education in the fields of design engineering (Owen, 1998, 2001), user centred design (Bruseberg and McDonagh-Philp, 2000) and human computer interaction design (Hevner et al., 2004) has a more robust trajectory than that of graphic and information design (Owen, 1998)....

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