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Proceedings ArticleDOI

Modality Influence on the Motor Learning of Ballroom Dance with a Mixed-Reality Human-Machine Interface

09 Jan 2022-
TL;DR: In this paper , a mixed-reality human-machine interface is presented to facilitate the practice of ballroom dance without the need of a human instructor nor human contact. But, due to the measures that are taken globally against the COVID19, a great number of training facilities have partially or completely restricted access to their trainers.
Abstract: Mastering ballroom dance requires learning motor skills such as synchronizing the body motion to a tempo as well as memorizing long sequences of dance steps. Traditionally, the acquisition of these skills is guided by an instructor, who adapts the training to the level of the trainee. However, due to the measures that are taken globally against the COVID19, a great number of training facilities have partially or completely restricted access to their trainers. To facilitate the practice of ballroom dance without the need of a human instructor nor human contact, this paper presents a mixed-reality human-machine interface that provides part practice of ballroom dance. It achieves it by fractionalizing the dance into only the footwork and conveying the tempo, position trajectory, and velocity trajectory with multimodal feedback. The multimodal feedback is generated with a floor projection, vibrotactile actuators, and a metronome, which provide visual, haptic, and auditory feedback. In an experiment with 15 participants, results suggest that the motor learning of dance skills occurs when visual and haptic feedback is present, whereas it is further improved when the three modalities (visual, haptic, and auditory) are employed during training.
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
24 Mar 2023
TL;DR: In this paper , a shared control policy was employed to help users keep inside of a designated path by providing visual guidance cues via a head-mounted device or haptic feedback via a wearable haptic interface.
Abstract: Nowadays, the number of mobility-disabled individuals who rely on a powered wheelchair to move is increasing. They need to be guided to follow a desired route when they are learning sports skills like wheelchair dance. Some systems using mixed-reality technologies to teach them to move around space are proposed. However, these methods still face difficulties in keeping users inside of a designated path. In this paper, we propose a method for teaching powered wheelchair users to follow a specific path by utilizing mixed-reality technology. In this method, we teach users how to move along a desired path by providing visual guidance cues via a head-mounted device or haptic guidance cues via a wearable haptic interface. Moreover, we employ a shared control policy to help users keep inside of the path. We conducted an experiment to evaluate the efficacy of the proposed method and to compare results for the two mixed-reality guidance modalities (visual feedback via a head-mounted device and haptic feedback via a haptic interface). The results reveal that the proposed guidance method with the shared control policy could help users follow a desired path with less deviation. We also discovered that users of the head-mounted device have similar results compared to those of the haptic interface.
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The result of user studies showed that the proposed dance training system can successfully guide students to improve their skills and can motivate them to learn.
Abstract: In this paper, a new dance training system based on the motion capture and virtual reality (VR) technologies is proposed. Our system is inspired by the traditional way to learn new movements-imitating the teacher's movements and listening to the teacher's feedback. A prototype of our proposed system is implemented, in which a student can imitate the motion demonstrated by a virtual teacher projected on the wall screen. Meanwhile, the student's motions will be captured and analyzed by the system based on which feedback is given back to them. The result of user studies showed that our system can successfully guide students to improve their skills. The subjects agreed that the system is interesting and can motivate them to learn.

361 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
08 Oct 2013
TL;DR: The design and implementation of YouMove and its interactive mirror are discussed and a user study is presented in which YouMove was shown to improve learning and short-term retention by a factor of 2 compared to a traditional video demonstration.
Abstract: YouMove is a novel system that allows users to record and learn physical movement sequences. The recording system is designed to be simple, allowing anyone to create and share training content. The training system uses recorded data to train the user using a large-scale augmented reality mirror. The system trains the user through a series of stages that gradually reduce the user's reliance on guidance and feedback. This paper discusses the design and implementation of YouMove and its interactive mirror. We also present a user study in which YouMove was shown to improve learning and short-term retention by a factor of 2 compared to a traditional video demonstration.

263 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This research proposes a novel approach where the student receives real-time tactile feedback, simultaneously over all joints, delivered through a wearable robotic system, which can supplement the visual or auditory feedback from the teacher.
Abstract: When humans learn a new motor skill from a teacher, they learn using multiple channels. They receive high level information aurally about the skill, visual information about how another performs the skill, and at times, tactile information from the teacher's physical guidance. This research proposes a novel approach where the student receives real-time tactile feedback, simultaneously over all joints, delivered through a wearable robotic system. This tactile feedback can supplement the visual or auditory feedback from the teacher. Our results using a 5-DOF robotic suit show a 27% improvement in accuracy while performing the target motion, and an accelerated learning rate of up to 23%. We report both of these results with high statistical significance (p les 0.01). This research is intended for use in a diverse set of applications including sports training, motor rehabilitation after neurological damage, dance, postural retraining for health, and many others. We call this system tactile interaction for kinesthetic learning (TIKL).

243 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Considering the impact of abrupt inactivity on overall health, strategies to mitigate the potential negative effects of isolation are of paramount importance, and resistance exercise emerges as a classic and proven method to increase muscle mass, strength, and functionality, even for nonagenarians.
Abstract: The World Health Organization labeled coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) a “public health emergency of international concern,” declaring it a pandemic in March 2020, with approximately 1,910,000 cases and greater than 123,000 deaths worldwide. Case-fatality rates dramatically increase with age, starting at approximately 0% to 1% in individuals aged between 20 and 59 years and scaling up to approximately 8% to 13% in individuals between the ages of 70 and 79 years and approximately 15% to 20% among those 80 years or older. Given the lack of available evidence-based treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, public health actions are of the utmost importance, with social distancing being recommended for infection control. Despite the latter’s positive effects on disease spread, the potential increase in sedentary behavior due to isolation can be detrimental to health. An abrupt reduction in activity levels, as would likely happen with social isolation, is of particular concern in older individuals, who are typically more inactive than their younger counterparts and prone to frailty, sarcopenia, and chronic diseases. Mechanical unloading of muscles resulting from periods of inactivity may lead to a transient exacerbation of agerelated muscle waste, accelerating the progression of sarcopenia and the development of comorbidities. Bed rest and limb immobilization have served as informative models to investigate the impact of drastic inactivity on muscle health, with literature consistently showing them to induce significantly greater muscle atrophy after only 5 to 10 days than seen annually in the older population. Lessons learned from step-reduction models are even more useful, as they represent physical inactivity imposed by isolation more accurately. Reducing daily steps (to 1,500 steps/day) has been shown to reduce leg fat-free mass by approximately 4% over 14 days in older individuals. Although the actual repercussion of the COVID-19 pandemic on physical inactivity remains unclear, wearable trackers (i.e., Fitbit) provide preliminary estimates of the impact of current social distancing on daily step counts. Data from 30 million users worldwide estimate a decline in step count of approximately 12% in the United States (when comparing the week of March 22, between 2019 and 2020), and even greater in other countries (e.g., 38%, 25%, and 15% in Spain, Italy, and Brazil, respectively). Muscle mass is associated with strength, a strong, independent risk factor for all-cause mortality in older people. Two weeks of inactivity (75% daily step reduction) has been shown to decrease muscle strength in approximately 8%, and despite a seemingly low value, 2 weeks of rehabilitation were ineffective in recovering muscle function, emphasizing the impact of abrupt reductions in physical activity in an already vulnerable population. In addition to its impact on muscle mass and function, reducing steps to approximately 1,000 to 1,500 steps/day has been shown to worsen glucose handling (skeletal muscle is the main glucose disposal site), which was accompanied by increased inflammation and anabolic resistance. Considering the impact of abrupt inactivity on overall health, strategies to mitigate the potential negative effects of isolation are of paramount importance. To this extent, resistance exercise emerges as a classic and proven method to increase muscle mass, strength, and functionality, even for nonagenarians. Home-based exercise programs can be invaluable during isolation, constituting a feasible strategy to maintain or even improve muscle health and functionality, helping to prevent falls (a common cause of disability) and hospitalization. The annual number of deaths attributed to physical inactivity has been estimated to be over 5 million globally. It is undisputed that measures of social isolation are required to counter the spread of COVID-19 and to avoid the collapse of health systems. However, we should also consider that increased inactivity has the potential to scale up morbimortality among older people, particularly if social isolation persists for longer periods. We believe it is critical that the international and national policy makers reinforce the importance of the older population to achieve the recommendations for physical activity—thoroughly described in Table 1 — during quarantine. A task force involving governments, universities, funding agencies, and professional healthcare associations should be implemented to develop, test, deliver, and monitor evidence-based physical activity programs aimed at increasing, or at the least maintaining, physical activity levels in older individuals. Moreover, clinicians should prescribe home-based, resistance exercises “as medicine” for all older individuals. Remotely tracking and motivating adherence to physical activity programs is also important. Patients’ health education should include recommendations to introduce light activity in their daily routine, focusing on sitting less and moving more, which is particularly relevant for patients DOI: 10.1111/jgs.16550

93 citations