scispace - formally typeset
Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1042/BCJ20200145

Molecular dynamics simulations and biochemical characterization of Pf14-3-3 and PfCDPK1 interaction towards its role in growth of human malaria parasite

26 Jun 2020-Biochemical Journal (Portland Press)-Vol. 477, Iss: 12, pp 2153-2177
Abstract: Scaffold proteins play pivotal role as modulators of cellular processes by operating as multipurpose conformation clamps. 14-3-3 proteins are gold-standard scaffold modules that recognize phosphoSer/Thr (pS/pT) containing conserved motifs, and confer conformational changes leading to modulation of functional parameters of their target proteins. Modulation in functional activity of kinases has been attributed to their interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. Herein, we have annotated and characterized PF3D7_0818200 as 14-3-3 isoform I in Plasmodium falciparum 3D7, and its interaction with one of the key kinases of the parasite, Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 (CDPK1) by performing various analytical biochemistry and biophysical assays. Molecular dynamics simulation studies indicated that CDPK1 polypeptide sequence (61KLGpS64) behaves as canonical Mode I-type (RXXpS/pT) consensus 14-3-3 binding motif, mediating the interaction. The 14-3-3I/CDPK1 interaction was validated in vitro with ELISA and SPR, which confirmed that the interaction is phosphorylation dependent, with binding affinity constant of 670 ± 3.6 nM. The interaction of 14-3-3I with CDPK1 was validated with well characterized optimal 14-3-3 recognition motifs: Mode I-type ARSHpSYPA and Mode II-type RLYHpSLPA, by simulation studies and ITC. This interaction was found to marginally enhance CDPK1 functional activity. Furthermore, interaction antagonizing peptidomimetics showed growth inhibitory impact on the parasite indicating crucial physiological role of 14-3-3/CDPK1 interaction. Overall, this study characterizes 14-3-3I as a scaffold protein in the malaria parasite and unveils CDPK1 as its previously unidentified target. This sets a precedent for the rational design of 14-3-3 based PPI inhibitors by utilizing 14-3-3 recognition motif peptides, as a potential antimalarial strategy.

...read more

Citations
  More

Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.PT.2021.01.002
Abstract: Malaria remains a heavy public health and socioeconomic burden in tropical and subtropical regions. Increasing resistance against front-line treatments implies that novel targets for antimalarial intervention are urgently required. Protein kinases of both the parasites and their host cells possess strong potential in this respect. We present an overview of the updated kinome of Plasmodium falciparum, the species that is the largest contributor to malaria mortality, and of current knowledge pertaining to the function of parasite-encoded protein kinases during the parasite's life cycle. Furthermore, we detail recent advances in drug initiatives targeting Plasmodium kinases and outline the potential of protein kinases in the context of the growing field of host-directed therapies, which is currently being explored as a novel way to combat parasite drug resistance.

...read more

Topics: Kinome (58%), Plasmodium falciparum (54%), Malaria (51%)

4 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3389/FMICB.2021.684005
Edwin Lasonder1, Kunal R. More2, Shailja Singh3, Malak Haidar4  +7 moreInstitutions (8)
Abstract: We review the role of signaling pathways in regulation of the key processes of merozoite egress and red blood cell invasion by Plasmodium falciparum and, in particular, the importance of the second messengers, cAMP and Ca2+, and cyclic nucleotide dependent kinases. cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is comprised of cAMP-binding regulatory, and catalytic subunits. The less well conserved cAMP-binding pockets should make cAMP analogs attractive drug leads, but this approach is compromised by the poor membrane permeability of cyclic nucleotides. We discuss how the conserved nature of ATP-binding pockets makes ATP analogs inherently prone to off-target effects and how ATP analogs and genetic manipulation can be useful research tools to examine this. We suggest that targeting PKA interaction partners as well as substrates, or developing inhibitors based on PKA interaction sites or phosphorylation sites in PKA substrates, may provide viable alternative approaches for the development of anti-malarial drugs. Proximity of PKA to a substrate is necessary for substrate phosphorylation, but the P. falciparum genome encodes few recognizable A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs), suggesting the importance of PKA-regulatory subunit myristylation and membrane association in determining substrate preference. We also discuss how Pf14-3-3 assembles a phosphorylation-dependent signaling complex that includes PKA and calcium dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1) and how this complex may be critical for merozoite invasion, and a target to block parasite growth. We compare altered phosphorylation levels in intracellular and egressed merozoites to identify potential PKA substrates. Finally, as host PKA may have a critical role in supporting intracellular parasite development, we discuss its role at other stages of the life cycle, as well as in other apicomplexan infections. Throughout our review we propose possible new directions for the therapeutic exploitation of cAMP-PKA-signaling in malaria and other diseases caused by apicomplexan parasites.

...read more

Topics: Protein kinase A (56%), Membrane permeability (54%), Signal transduction (51%) ...read more

1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/19420889.2021.1972523
Abstract: Red blood cells infected with Plasmodium falciparum secrete extracellular vesicles in order to facilitate the survival and infection of human cells. Various researchers have studied the composition of these extracellular vesicles and identified the proteins contained inside. In this work, we used that information to detect potential P. falciparum molecules that could be imitating host proteins. We carried out several searches to detect sequences and structural similarities between the parasite and host. Additionally, the possibility of functional mimicry was explored in line with the potential role that each candidate can perform for the parasite inside the host. Lastly, we determined a set of eight sequences (mainly moonlighting proteins) with a remarkable resemblance to human proteins. Due to the resemblance observed, this study proposes the possibility that certain P. falciparum molecules carried by extracellular vesicles could be imitating human proteins to manipulate the host cell's physiology.

...read more

Topics: Molecular mimicry (52%), Protein moonlighting (51%), Secretion (50%) ...read more
References
  More

Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/S0022-2836(05)80360-2
Stephen F. Altschul1, Warren Gish1, Webb Miller2, Eugene W. Myers3  +1 moreInstitutions (3)
Abstract: A new approach to rapid sequence comparison, basic local alignment search tool (BLAST), directly approximates alignments that optimize a measure of local similarity, the maximal segment pair (MSP) score. Recent mathematical results on the stochastic properties of MSP scores allow an analysis of the performance of this method as well as the statistical significance of alignments it generates. The basic algorithm is simple and robust; it can be implemented in a number of ways and applied in a variety of contexts including straight-forward DNA and protein sequence database searches, motif searches, gene identification searches, and in the analysis of multiple regions of similarity in long DNA sequences. In addition to its flexibility and tractability to mathematical analysis, BLAST is an order of magnitude faster than existing sequence comparison tools of comparable sensitivity.

...read more

Topics: Substitution matrix (59%), Sim4 (58%), Alignment-free sequence analysis (57%) ...read more

81,150 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1093/MOLBEV/MST197
Koichiro Tamura1, Glen Stecher2, Daniel S. Peterson2, Alan Filipski2  +2 moreInstitutions (3)
Abstract: We announce the release of an advanced version of the Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA) software, which currently contains facilities for building sequence alignments, inferring phylogenetic histories, and conducting molecular evolutionary analysis. In version 6.0, MEGA now enables the inference of timetrees, as it implements the RelTime method for estimating divergence times for all branching points in a phylogeny. A new Timetree Wizard in MEGA6 facilitates this timetree inference by providing a graphical user interface (GUI) to specify the phylogeny and calibration constraints step-by-step. This version also contains enhanced algorithms to search for the optimal trees under evolutionary criteria and implements a more advanced memory management that can double the size of sequence data sets to which MEGA can be applied. Both GUI and command-line versions of MEGA6 can be downloaded from www.megasoftware.net free of charge.

...read more

Topics: Mega- (51%)

33,373 Citations


Open access
01 Jan 2013-
Abstract: We announce the release of an advanced version of the Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA) software, which currently contains facilities for building sequence alignments, inferring phylogenetic histories, and conducting molecular evolutionary analysis. In version 6.0, MEGA now enables the inference of timetrees, as it implements the RelTime method for estimating divergence times for all branching points in a phylogeny. A new Timetree Wizard in MEGA6 facilitates this timetree inference by providing a graphical user interface (GUI) to specify the phylogeny and calibration constraints step-by-step. This version also contains enhanced algorithms to search for the optimal trees under evolutionary criteria and implements a more advanced memory management that can double the size of sequence data sets to which MEGA can be applied. Both GUI and command-line versions of MEGA6 can be downloaded from www. megasoftware.net free of charge.

...read more

Topics: Mega- (50%)

30,478 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1093/NAR/28.1.235
Abstract: The Protein Data Bank (PDB; http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/ ) is the single worldwide archive of structural data of biological macromolecules. This paper describes the goals of the PDB, the systems in place for data deposition and access, how to obtain further information, and near-term plans for the future development of the resource.

...read more

30,190 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1107/S0021889892009944
Abstract: The PROCHECK suite of programs provides a detailed check on the stereochemistry of a protein structure Its outputs comprise a number of plots in PostScript format and a comprehensive residue-by-residue listing These give an assessment of the overall quality of the structure as compared with well refined structures of the same resolution and also highlight regions that may need further investigation The PROCHECK programs are useful for assessing the quality not only of protein structures in the process of being solved but also of existing structures and of those being modelled on known structures

...read more

21,583 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of citations received by the Paper in previous years
YearCitations
20213