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Moving forward the concept : Critical reflections on universality of music perception

17 Jan 2014-Iss: 095, pp 97-108
TL;DR: In this article, the authors try to look at universal aspects of music, especially as outlined by Tagg, and engaging into articulation on how music can universally be pleasurab...
Abstract: This theoretical paper is an attempt of trying to look at universal aspects of music, especially as outlined by Philip Tagg, and engaging into articulation on how music can universally be pleasurab ...
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Journal ArticleDOI
20 Apr 1907
TL;DR: For instance, when a dog sees another dog at a distance, it is often clear that he perceives that it is a dog in the abstract; for when he gets nearer his whole manner suddenly changes, if the other dog be a friend as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: ION, GENERAL CONCEPTIONS, SELF-CONSCIOUSNESS, MENTAL INDIVIDUALITY. It would be very difficult for any one with even much more knowledge than I possess, to determine how far animals exhibit any traces of these high mental powers. This difficulty arises from the impossibility of judging what passes through the mind of an animal; and again, the fact that writers differ to a great extent in the meaning which they attribute to the above terms, causes a further difficulty. If one may judge from various articles which have been published lately, the greatest stress seems to be laid on the supposed entire absence in animals of the power of abstraction, or of forming general concepts. But when a dog sees another dog at a distance, it is often clear that he perceives that it is a dog in the abstract; for when he gets nearer his whole manner suddenly changes, if the other dog be a friend. A recent writer remarks, that in all such cases it is a pure assumption to assert that the mental act is not essentially of the same nature in the animal as in man. If either refers what he perceives with his senses to a mental concept, then so do both. (44. Mr. Hookham, in a letter to Prof. Max Muller, in the 'Birmingham News,' May, 1873.) When I say to my terrier, in an eager voice (and I have made the trial many times), "Hi, hi, where is it?" she at once takes it as a sign that something is to be hunted, and generally first looks quickly all around, and then rushes into the nearest thicket, to scent for any game, but finding nothing, she looks up into any neighbouring tree for a squirrel. Now do not these actions clearly shew that she had in her mind a general idea or concept that some animal is to be discovered and hunted? It may be freely admitted that no animal is self-conscious, if by this term it is implied, that he reflects on such points, as whence he comes or whither he will go, or what is life and death, and so forth. But how can we feel sure that an old dog with an excellent memory and some power of imagination, as shewn by his dreams, never reflects on his past pleasures or pains in the chase? And this would be a form of self-consciousness. On the other hand, as Buchner (45. 'Conferences sur la Theorie Darwinienne,' French translat. 1869, p. 132.) has remarked, how little can the hardworked wife of a degraded Australian savage, who uses very few abstract words, and cannot count above four, exert her self-consciousness, or reflect on the nature of her own existence. It is generally admitted, that the higher animals possess memory, attention, association, and even some imagination and reason. If these powers, which differ much in different animals, are capable of improvement, there seems no great improbability in more complex faculties, such as the higher forms of abstraction, and selfconsciousness, etc., having been evolved through the development and combination of the simpler ones. It has been urged against the views here maintained that it is impossible to say at what point in the ascending scale animals become capable of abstraction, etc.; but who can say at what age this occurs in our young children? We see at least that such powers

1,464 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 1988-Chest

678 citations

Book
14 Aug 1991
TL;DR: These are the most extensive and proven study aids available, covering all the major areas of study in college curriculums, and each guide features: up- to-date scholarship; an easy-to-follow narrative outline form; specially designed and formatted pages; and much more.
Abstract: Prepared for students by renowned professors and noted experts, here are the most extensive and proven study aids available, covering all the major areas of study in college curriculums. Each guide features: up-to-date scholarship; an easy-to-follow narrative outline form; specially designed and formatted pages; and much more.

217 citations

Book
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the social production of music and its role in the music industry and its effect on the audience. But their focus is on new audiences, scenes, and everyday life.
Abstract: * List of Figures * List of Tables * List of Boxes * Acknowledgements * Introduction *1. Constraints and Creativity: Arguments and Framework * PART 1 PRODUCTION *2. The Pop Music Industry *3. The Social Production of Music * PART 2 TEXT *4. History, Politics and Sexuality *5. 'Black' Music: Genres and Social Constructions *6. Texts and Meaning *7. Performance, Dance, Distinction and the Body * PART 3 AUDIENCE *8. Effects, Audiences and Subcultures *9. Fans, Production and Consumption *10. Beyond Subcultures and Fans: New Audiences, Scenes and Everyday Life * Conclusions * Further Reading * References

44 citations

References
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Book
24 Feb 1871
TL;DR: In this paper, secondary sexual characters of fishes, amphibians and reptiles are presented. But the authors focus on the secondary sexual characteristics of fishes and amphibians rather than the primary sexual characters.
Abstract: Part II. Sexual Selection (continued): 12. Secondary sexual characters of fishes, amphibians and reptiles 13. Secondary sexual characters of birds 14. Birds (continued) 15. Birds (continued) 16. Birds (concluded) 17. Secondary sexual characters of mammals 18. Secondary sexual characters of mammals (continued) 19. Secondary sexual characters of man 20. Secondary sexual characters of man (continued) 21. General summary and conclusion Index.

11,302 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: Part I. Sexual Selection (continued): Secondary sexual characters of fishes, amphibians and reptiles, and secondarySexual characters of birds.

6,894 citations


"Moving forward the concept : Critic..." refers background in this paper

  • ...…"the suspicion does not appear improbable that the progenitors of man, either the males or females, or both sexes, before they had acquired the power of expressing their mutual love in articulate language, endeavoured to charm each other with musical notes and rhythm" (Darwin, 1871/1981, p. 337)....

    [...]

Book
01 Jan 1977

3,315 citations


"Moving forward the concept : Critic..." refers background in this paper

  • ...For many years, research that followed Barthes, 1977, one of the early and very successful pioneers of the field, was not so different and still primarily focused on musical metaphors or semantics of music....

    [...]

Book
01 Jan 1974
TL;DR: Television: Technology and Cultural Form was first published in 1974, long before the dawn of multi-channel TV, or the reality and celebrity shows that now pack the schedules as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Television: Technology and Cultural Form was first published in 1974, long before the dawn of multi-channel TV, or the reality and celebrity shows that now pack the schedules. Yet Williams' analysis of television's history, its institutions, programmes and practices, and its future prospects, remains remarkably prescient. Williams stresses the importance of technology in shaping the cultural form of television, while always resisting the determinism of McLuhan's dictum that 'the medium is the message'. If the medium really is the message, Williams asks, what is left for us to do or say? Williams argues that, on the contrary, we as viewers have the power to disturb, disrupt and to distract the otherwise cold logic of history and technology - not just because television is part of the fabric of our daily lives, but because new technologies continue to offer opportunities, momentarily outside the sway of transnational corporations or the grasp of media moguls, for new forms of self and political expression.

1,950 citations

Book
01 Jan 1818
TL;DR: The Cambridge edition of Schopenhauer's The World as Will and Representation as discussed by the authors is the most complete German edition of the entire work, including a glossary of names and bibliography, and succinct editorial notes.
Abstract: The purpose of the Cambridge Edition of the Works of Schopenhauer is to offer translations of the best modern German editions of Schopenhauer’s work in a uniform format suitable for Schopenhauer scholars, together with philosophical introductions and full editorial apparatus. First published in 1818, The World as Will and Representation contains Schopenhauer’s entire philosophy, ranging through epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind and action, aesthetics and philosophy of art, to ethics, the meaning of life and the philosophy of religion, in an attempt to account for the world in all its significant aspects. It gives a unique and influential account of what is and is not of value in existence, the striving and pain of the human condition and the possibility of deliverance from it. This new translation of the first volume of what later became a two-volume work reflects the eloquence and power of Schopenhauer’s prose and renders philosophical terms accurately and consistently. It offers an introduction, glossary of names and bibliography, and succinct editorial notes, including notes on the revisions of the text which Schopenhauer made in 1844 and 1859.

1,562 citations