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Music composition and epistemic injustice

29 Sep 2022-Tempo-Vol. 76, pp 32-41
TL;DR: In this article , the authors consider the implications of the consideration of epistemic justice within modes of composition pedagogy in higher education and frame the composers themselves as individuals prior to the technical exercises that they may undertake.
Abstract: Abstract This article considers the implications of the consideration of epistemic justice within modes of composition pedagogy in higher education and is in part a manifesto, in part a reflection on my experiences of teaching composition in this setting. I ask how composition education can become, as described in 2015 by the North Macedonian dramatist and creative educator Goran Stefanovski, ‘the politics of the impossible’. I question how composition education could function without a canon of examples or assumed master–apprentice hierarchies and frame this as a question of epistemic justice, one that considers the composers themselves as individuals prior to the technical exercises that they may undertake. I describe why I believe that epistemic justice is a concept that is worthy of consideration in creative education in composition alongside the ways that current models of composition pedagogy might unintentionally cause students to experience epistemic injustice within their education experiences. Rather than a prescriptive model, I propose challenges that I hope can influence my educational approach now and in the future and conclude with some suggestions about what a model of hermeneutic epistemic justice might look like as a pedagogic model for music composition.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an insightful way of articulating the feminist concept of epistemic injustice can be provided by paying significant attention to recognition theory, which can be found in the work of this article.
Abstract: My aim in this article is to propose that an insightful way of articulating the feminist concept of epistemic injustice can be provided by paying significant attention to recognition theory The ar

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TL;DR: Research-led teaching and learning (RLTL) project as discussed by the authors investigated the reality of the university rhetoric concerning the relationship of research to teaching and found that academic and undergraduate students understand and experience as research-led learning.
Abstract: This paper reports on one aspect the Research-led Teaching and Learning (RLTL) Project, which set out to investigate the reality of the university rhetoric concerning the relationship of research to teaching. The university, like many others, bases some of its claims to the excellence of its teaching and the quality of the learning experience enjoyed by its students on the close connection that is made between its research, and teaching and learning. The project was initiated to explore this relationship through evidence from students, academics and other members of the university. In doing so, we hoped to gain a clearer and deeper understanding of what the university means by research-led teaching and learning. The findings of the research and the report covered a wider range of issues than had been originally envisaged. This paper focuses on the first part of the report: what academics and undergraduate students understand and experience as research-led teaching and learning.

217 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Juliet Hess1
TL;DR: In this paper, Chandra Talpade Mohanty (2003) put forward three curricular models that describe the manner in which other subject material is engaged in the curriculum within the discipline of women's studies.
Abstract: Current music education curricula across Canada designate Western classical music as the music most worthy of study through emphasis on elements of music that are decidedly Western. Despite the way the curriculum is constructed, many music teachers strive to create diverse programs for their students. In her examination of women’s studies programs, Chandra Talpade Mohanty (2003) puts forward three curricular models that describe the manner in which “Other” subject material is engaged in the curriculum within the discipline of women’s studies. I rethink her pedagogical models and apply them to music education. Mohanty’s first two models are more tokenistic in nature while the third model is comparative. While there are benefits to the first two models, the third, when applied to music, reveals that musics are better understood relationally. Mohanty’s (2003) third pedagogical model has much to offer music education.

71 citations