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Journal ArticleDOI

Music composition and epistemic injustice

29 Sep 2022-Tempo (Tempo)-Vol. 76, Iss: 302, pp 32-41
TL;DR: In this article , the authors consider the implications of the consideration of epistemic justice within modes of composition pedagogy in higher education and frame the composers themselves as individuals prior to the technical exercises that they may undertake.
Abstract: Abstract This article considers the implications of the consideration of epistemic justice within modes of composition pedagogy in higher education and is in part a manifesto, in part a reflection on my experiences of teaching composition in this setting. I ask how composition education can become, as described in 2015 by the North Macedonian dramatist and creative educator Goran Stefanovski, ‘the politics of the impossible’. I question how composition education could function without a canon of examples or assumed master–apprentice hierarchies and frame this as a question of epistemic justice, one that considers the composers themselves as individuals prior to the technical exercises that they may undertake. I describe why I believe that epistemic justice is a concept that is worthy of consideration in creative education in composition alongside the ways that current models of composition pedagogy might unintentionally cause students to experience epistemic injustice within their education experiences. Rather than a prescriptive model, I propose challenges that I hope can influence my educational approach now and in the future and conclude with some suggestions about what a model of hermeneutic epistemic justice might look like as a pedagogic model for music composition.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Hidden Curriculum as discussed by the authors, a covert pattern of socialization which prepares students to function in the existing workplace and in other social/political spheres, has been largely ignored by social studies curriculum developers.
Abstract: This paper reviews recent studies on the relationship of classroom life to larger social/political institutions. It analyzes the phenomenon which Philip Jackson has identified as the “hidden curriculum”, that covert pattern of socialization which prepares students to function in the existing workplace and in other social/political spheres. The authors argue that this pattern has been largely ignored by social studies curriculum developers. By ignoring the values contained in the social processes of schooling, social studies developers failed to influence school programs in a fundamental way. To promote a more complete understanding of the dynamics of classroom life and its relationship to the larger society, the authors have identified social processes of school and classroom life which give specific meaning to the term hidden curriculum. They argue that a new set of processes will have to replace existing ones if the goals of social education are to be realized. In the latter part of the paper, ...

337 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Research-led teaching and learning (RLTL) project as discussed by the authors investigated the reality of the university rhetoric concerning the relationship of research to teaching and found that academic and undergraduate students understand and experience as research-led learning.
Abstract: This paper reports on one aspect the Research-led Teaching and Learning (RLTL) Project, which set out to investigate the reality of the university rhetoric concerning the relationship of research to teaching. The university, like many others, bases some of its claims to the excellence of its teaching and the quality of the learning experience enjoyed by its students on the close connection that is made between its research, and teaching and learning. The project was initiated to explore this relationship through evidence from students, academics and other members of the university. In doing so, we hoped to gain a clearer and deeper understanding of what the university means by research-led teaching and learning. The findings of the research and the report covered a wider range of issues than had been originally envisaged. This paper focuses on the first part of the report: what academics and undergraduate students understand and experience as research-led teaching and learning.

217 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Juliet Hess1
TL;DR: In this paper, Chandra Talpade Mohanty (2003) put forward three curricular models that describe the manner in which other subject material is engaged in the curriculum within the discipline of women's studies.
Abstract: Current music education curricula across Canada designate Western classical music as the music most worthy of study through emphasis on elements of music that are decidedly Western. Despite the way the curriculum is constructed, many music teachers strive to create diverse programs for their students. In her examination of women’s studies programs, Chandra Talpade Mohanty (2003) puts forward three curricular models that describe the manner in which “Other” subject material is engaged in the curriculum within the discipline of women’s studies. I rethink her pedagogical models and apply them to music education. Mohanty’s first two models are more tokenistic in nature while the third model is comparative. While there are benefits to the first two models, the third, when applied to music, reveals that musics are better understood relationally. Mohanty’s (2003) third pedagogical model has much to offer music education.

71 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article identified five conditions that make an epistemic injustice an injustice, including race, gender, social background, ethnicity, race, sexuality, tone of voice, accent, and so on.
Abstract: The ability to be treated equally as a knower has in recent years become increasingly recognized as an important aspect of justice within social and political philosophy. Unfair and unjust communicative structures, institutions, and practices have the potential to reproduce and further exacerbate existing socioeconomic inequalities and injustices. Epistemic injustice is the idea that we can be unfairly discriminated against in our capacity as a knower based on prejudices about the speaker, such as gender, social background, ethnicity, race, sexuality, tone of voice, accent, and so on. The concept of epistemic injustice has fostered a large body of literature in recent years, which seeks to clarify the concept and apply it to practical cases. Yet, the literature on epistemic injustice has mainly focused on what makes an epistemic injustice epistemic—as opposed to distributive or socioeconomic—and little attention has been paid to what exactly makes an epistemic injustice an injustice. In this paper, I aim to fill this lacuna by asking under what conditions epistemic discrimination suffered by a knower becomes an epistemic injustice. In particular, I argue that we can identify five conditions that make an epistemic injustice an injustice. While the first two conditions—the disadvantage condition and the prejudice condition—are derived from Fricker’s (2007) arguments, I identify three additional conditions—the stakeholder condition, the epistemic condition, and the social justice condition—the violation of which create an epistemic injustice. The paper thus contributes to the literature on epistemic injustice by clarifying and extending existing work on epistemic injustice to identify a set of conditions through which it is possible to eliminate cases of epistemic disadvantage that are not unjust and make it easier to systematically identify and evaluate claims of epistemic injustice. The paper is structured as follows. In Section 2, I provide a short introduction to the concept of “epistemic injustice,” why it is an important aspect of justice, and how it adversely affects those who are subject to it. In Section 3, I further identify, analyze, and discuss two conditions of epistemic injustice in Fricker (2007)—the disadvantage condition and the prejudice condition. In Section 4, I present three additional conditions that make an epistemic injustice an injustice,

45 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that expressive writing enables the creative practitioner to engage with their practice in insightful ways that integrate theoretical insights and help to reveal the elusive obvious, which in turn gives life to what is being explored.
Abstract: This article draws on the idea of the elusive obvious as a useful way of examining how creative arts practitioners can make sense of their practice through expressive writing. Defining the elusive obvious as that ethereal aspect of creative arts practice that is often palpable to the practitioner but equally hard to pin down within the creative process, the article argues that expressive writing enables the creative practitioner to engage with their practice in insightful ways that integrate theoretical insights and help to reveal the elusive obvious, which in turn gives life to what is being explored. It examines ways in which expressive writing could be used to facilitate practitioners' experience of their creative practice and facilitate a better appreciation of the interconnectedness of practice (doing) and theory (critical reflection and analysis) in the creative arts. The article draws on discussions on practice as research to highlight the distinction between 'writing out' and 'writing up'; where 'writing out' calls attention to the idea of 'searching' within the creative process, while 'writing up' is firmly located in the recording and documentation phase of that practice. It argues that it is within this process of 'writing out' - of searching - that the elusive obvious can be revealed. The article also illustrates how reflective practice/writing can be understood through drama. It examines how reflective practice/writing can often lead to 'eureka' moments when, by personalizing their practice within the creative working environment, practitioners suddenly discover the elusive obvious. Through the ideas explored in this article, we invite a consideration of how expressive writing can act as a vehicle through which meaning could be found. This article argues, therefore, that expressive writing is not an end in itself, but is exploratory and transient in nature, and a rich terrain for the elusive obvious to be revealed.

5 citations