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Journal ArticleDOI

‘Navigating the bubble’: Exploring student experiences of design writing

01 Jan 2021-Journal of Writing in Creative Practice (Intellect)-Vol. 14, Iss: 1, pp 43-57
TL;DR: This paper explored student perceptions and experiences of design writing, with data surfacing themes of anxiety, identity, artefact, articulation, process and value, and suggested how to support students to write about design praxis.
Abstract: Undergraduate design students at London College of Communication were interviewed about the relationship between their writing practice and their design practice Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences (1983) framed the study This article takes the position that polarizing the relationship between linguistic (textual) and bodily kinaesthetic (visual) forms of intelligence itself becomes a barrier to arts students’ epistemological development The well-rehearsed art school rhetoric of ‘I’m a visual person not a writer’ can become a self-fulfilling prophecy, disabling the potential to learn through writing The research explored student perceptions and experiences of design writing, with data surfacing themes of anxiety, identity, artefact, articulation, process and value Suggestions about how to support students to write about design praxis are presented for consideration
References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The main aim of this paper is to examine some of the major implications of this interactive, instructional relationship between the developing child and his elders for the study of skill acquisition and problem solving.
Abstract: THIS PAPER is concerned with the nature of the tutorial process; the means whereby an adult or \"expert\" helps somebody who is less adult or less expert. Though its aim is general, it is expressed in terms of a particular task: a tutor seeks to teach children aged 3, 4 and 5 yr to build a particular three-dimensional structure that requires a degree of skill that is initially beyond them. It is the usual type of tutoring situation in which one member \"knows the answer\" and the other does not, rather like a \"practical\" in which only the instructor \"knows how\". The changing interaction of tutor and children provide our data. A great deal of early problem solving by the developing child is of this order. Although from the earliest months of life he is a \"natural\" problem solver in his own right (e.g. Bruner, 1973) it is often the ease that his efforts are assisted and fostered by others who are more skilful than he is (Kaye, 1970). Whether he is learning the procedures that constitute the skills of attending, communicating, manipulating objects, locomoting, or, indeed, a more effective problem solving procedure itself, there are usually others in attendance who help him on his way. Tutorial interactions are, in short, a crucial feature of infancy and childhood. Our species, moreover, appears to be the only one in which any \"intentional\" tutoring goes on (Bruner, 1972; Hinde, 1971). For although it is true that many of the higher primate species learn by observation of their elders (Hamburg, 1968; van Lawick-Goodall, 1968), there is no evidence that those elders do anything to instruct their charges in the performance of the skill in question. What distinguishes man as a species is not only his capacity for learning, but for teaching as well. It is the main aim of this paper to examine some of the major implications of this interactive, instructional relationship between the developing child and his elders for the study of skill acquisition and problem solving. The acquisition of skill in the human child can be fruitfully conceived as a hierarchical program in which component skills are combined into \"higher skills\" by appropriate orchestration to meet new, more complex task requirements (Bruner, 1973). The process is analogous to problem solving in which mastery of \"lower order\" or constituent problems in a sine qua non for success with a larger jjroblcm, each level influencing the other—as with reading where the deciphering of words makes possible the deciphering of sentences, and sentences then aid in the deciphering of particular words (F. Smith, 1971). Given persistent intention in the young learner, given a \"lexicon\" of constituent skills, the crucial task is often one of com-

7,915 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 1993
TL;DR: A review of the research methods literature examining the benefits and pitfalls of doing research in familiar settings and amongst peers, and encompasses educational literature, and material from the disciplines of anthropology and sociology within which very similar problems are encountered as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: This paper presents a review of the research methods literature examining the benefits and pitfalls of doing research in familiar settings and amongst peers, and encompasses educational literature, and material from the disciplines of anthropology and sociology within which very similar problems are encountered. The advantages of researching in familiar settings, for example the relative lack of culture shock or disorientation, the possibility of enhanced rapport and communication, the ability to gauge the honesty and accuracy of responses, and the likelihood that respondents will reveal more intimate details of their lives to someone considered empathetic are juxtaposed with the problems that proponents of insider research nevertheless acknowledge. In addition to the oft‐cited problems of over‐familiarity and taken‐for‐granted assumptions, large amounts of impression management may be required of the insider researcher in order to avoid manifesting out‐group or undesirable characteristics. There...

213 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
John Wood1
TL;DR: The authors re-design academic writing protocols for design education, adopting a more empathetic model to make writing more like designing for a specified client, which may be useful in the competitive culture of bureaucratic work.
Abstract: Historically, the culture of design education reflects an uneasy liaison between the mediaeval monastic (‘book’) and the crafts guilds (‘design studio’) traditions. For this reason it has been difficult to integrate both modes of knowledge in design education. Common misunderstandings about ‘scholastic rigour’ are symptomatic of this confusion. ‘Rigorous’ writing is fundamentally rule-based and organizational, and can therefore be at odds with the situated, opportunistic judgements involved with much design practice. We should therefore re-design academic writing protocols for design education.By thinking about ‘rigour’ we may absolve it, perhaps adopting a more empathetic model to make writing more like designing for a specified client. The standard school essay implies a 180° relationship between authors and their unknown readers. It is profoundly linear, fact-based and rhetorical, therefore it may be useful in the competitive culture of bureaucratic work. For this reason, we need better practices of ‘s...

63 citations

Book Chapter
01 Jan 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the nature and impact of student and tutor expectations and identify a number of gaps between these expectations that offer particular pedagogic challenges, and argue that in not accepting the responsibility to provide a safe transition framework, we may be failing some students.
Abstract: This chapter explores the nature and impact of student and tutor expectations and identifies a number of gaps between these expectations that offer particular pedagogic challenges. Commonly these gaps are attributed to student failure to adapt or understand the challenges presented to them within the art and design higer education environment. However, we would argue that in not accepting the responsibility to provide a 'safe' transitional framework, we may be failing some students. This chapter describes a series of transitions that art and design students must negotiate as they move between the compulsory and post-compulsory education sector and between higher education and employment within the creative industries sector. These transitions are key points where gaps in expectations become evident and where we as educators need to undertake further work to support our students as they enter and exit further and higher education. The authors discuss those expectations, illustrated with a student vignette, and propose some ways forward for the 'wicked problems'of the often ambiguous and open-ended nature of learning tasks in art and design.

42 citations