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Proceedings ArticleDOI

Networking named content

01 Dec 2009-pp 1-12

TL;DR: Content-Centric Networking (CCN) is presented, which treats content as a primitive - decoupling location from identity, security and access, and retrieving content by name, using new approaches to routing named content.
Abstract: Network use has evolved to be dominated by content distribution and retrieval, while networking technology still speaks only of connections between hosts. Accessing content and services requires mapping from the what that users care about to the network's where. We present Content-Centric Networking (CCN) which treats content as a primitive - decoupling location from identity, security and access, and retrieving content by name. Using new approaches to routing named content, derived heavily from IP, we can simultaneously achieve scalability, security and performance. We implemented our architecture's basic features and demonstrate resilience and performance with secure file downloads and VoIP calls.
Topics: Content centric networking (64%), Information-centric networking (62%), Content management (61%), Scalability (51%), Voice over IP (51%)
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Content-Centric Networking (CCN) is presented which uses content chunks as a primitive---decoupling location from identity, security and access, and retrieving chunks of content by name, and simultaneously achieves scalability, security, and performance.
Abstract: Current network use is dominated by content distribution and retrieval yet current networking protocols are designed for conversations between hosts. Accessing content and services requires mapping from the what that users care about to the network's where. We present Content-Centric Networking (CCN) which uses content chunks as a primitive---decoupling location from identity, security and access, and retrieving chunks of content by name. Using new approaches to routing named content, derived from IP, CCN simultaneously achieves scalability, security, and performance. We describe our implementation of the architecture's basic features and demonstrate its performance and resilience with secure file downloads and VoIP calls.

3,024 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 2012-
TL;DR: A survey of technologies, applications and research challenges for Internetof-Things is presented, in which digital and physical entities can be linked by means of appropriate information and communication technologies to enable a whole new class of applications and services.
Abstract: The term ‘‘Internet-of-Things’’ is used as an umbrella keyword for covering various aspects related to the extension of the Internet and the Web into the physical realm, by means of the widespread deployment of spatially distributed devices with embedded identification, sensing and/or actuation capabilities. Internet-of-Things envisions a future in which digital and physical entities can be linked, by means of appropriate information and communication technologies, to enable a whole new class of applications and services. In this article, we present a survey of technologies, applications and research challenges for Internetof-Things.

2,837 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The SDN architecture and the OpenFlow standard in particular are presented, current alternatives for implementation and testing of SDN-based protocols and services are discussed, current and future SDN applications are examined, and promising research directions based on the SDN paradigm are explored.
Abstract: The idea of programmable networks has recently re-gained considerable momentum due to the emergence of the Software-Defined Networking (SDN) paradigm. SDN, often referred to as a ''radical new idea in networking'', promises to dramatically simplify network management and enable innovation through network programmability. This paper surveys the state-of-the-art in programmable networks with an emphasis on SDN. We provide a historic perspective of programmable networks from early ideas to recent developments. Then we present the SDN architecture and the OpenFlow standard in particular, discuss current alternatives for implementation and testing of SDN-based protocols and services, examine current and future SDN applications, and explore promising research directions based on the SDN paradigm.

1,786 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Lixia Zhang1, Alexander Afanasyev1, Jeff Burke1, Van Jacobson1  +5 moreInstitutions (5)
28 Jul 2014-
TL;DR: The NDN project investigates Van Jacobson's proposed evolution from today's host-centric network architecture (IP) to a data-centricnetwork architecture (NDN), which has far-reaching implications for how the authors design, develop, deploy, and use networks and applications.
Abstract: Named Data Networking (NDN) is one of five projects funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation under its Future Internet Architecture Program. NDN has its roots in an earlier project, Content-Centric Networking (CCN), which Van Jacobson first publicly presented in 2006. The NDN project investigates Jacobson's proposed evolution from today's host-centric network architecture (IP) to a data-centric network architecture (NDN). This conceptually simple shift has far-reaching implications for how we design, develop, deploy, and use networks and applications. We describe the motivation and vision of this new architecture, and its basic components and operations. We also provide a snapshot of its current design, development status, and research challenges. More information about the project, including prototype implementations, publications, and annual reports, is available on named-data.net.

1,680 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work compares and discusses design choices and features of proposed ICN architectures, focusing on the following main components: named data objects, naming and security, API, routing and transport, and caching.
Abstract: The information-centric networking (ICN) concept is a significant common approach of several future Internet research activities. The approach leverages in-network caching, multiparty communication through replication, and interaction models decoupling senders and receivers. The goal is to provide a network infrastructure service that is better suited to today?s use (in particular. content distribution and mobility) and more resilient to disruptions and failures. The ICN approach is being explored by a number of research projects. We compare and discuss design choices and features of proposed ICN architectures, focusing on the following main components: named data objects, naming and security, API, routing and transport, and caching. We also discuss the advantages of the ICN approach in general.

1,545 citations


References
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
Ion Stoica1, Robert Morris2, David R. Karger2, M. Frans Kaashoek2  +1 moreInstitutions (2)
27 Aug 2001-
TL;DR: Results from theoretical analysis, simulations, and experiments show that Chord is scalable, with communication cost and the state maintained by each node scaling logarithmically with the number of Chord nodes.
Abstract: A fundamental problem that confronts peer-to-peer applications is to efficiently locate the node that stores a particular data item. This paper presents Chord, a distributed lookup protocol that addresses this problem. Chord provides support for just one operation: given a key, it maps the key onto a node. Data location can be easily implemented on top of Chord by associating a key with each data item, and storing the key/data item pair at the node to which the key maps. Chord adapts efficiently as nodes join and leave the system, and can answer queries even if the system is continuously changing. Results from theoretical analysis, simulations, and experiments show that Chord is scalable, with communication cost and the state maintained by each node scaling logarithmically with the number of Chord nodes.

10,183 citations


Additional excerpts

  • ...A circular namespace is created to ensure correct routing (as in Chord [36]), but additional pointers are added to shorten routes....

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Journal ArticleDOI
Van Jacobson1Institutions (1)
01 Aug 1988-
TL;DR: The measurements and the reports of beta testers suggest that the final product is fairly good at dealing with congested conditions on the Internet, and an algorithm recently developed by Phil Karn of Bell Communications Research is described in a soon-to-be-published RFC.
Abstract: In October of '86, the Internet had the first of what became a series of 'congestion collapses'. During this period, the data throughput from LBL to UC Berkeley (sites separated by 400 yards and three IMP hops) dropped from 32 Kbps to 40 bps. Mike Karels1 and I were fascinated by this sudden factor-of-thousand drop in bandwidth and embarked on an investigation of why things had gotten so bad. We wondered, in particular, if the 4.3BSD (Berkeley UNIX) TCP was mis-behaving or if it could be tuned to work better under abysmal network conditions. The answer to both of these questions was “yes”.Since that time, we have put seven new algorithms into the 4BSD TCP: round-trip-time variance estimationexponential retransmit timer backoffslow-startmore aggressive receiver ack policydynamic window sizing on congestionKarn's clamped retransmit backofffast retransmit Our measurements and the reports of beta testers suggest that the final product is fairly good at dealing with congested conditions on the Internet.This paper is a brief description of (i) - (v) and the rationale behind them. (vi) is an algorithm recently developed by Phil Karn of Bell Communications Research, described in [KP87]. (viii) is described in a soon-to-be-published RFC.Algorithms (i) - (v) spring from one observation: The flow on a TCP connection (or ISO TP-4 or Xerox NS SPP connection) should obey a 'conservation of packets' principle. And, if this principle were obeyed, congestion collapse would become the exception rather than the rule. Thus congestion control involves finding places that violate conservation and fixing them.By 'conservation of packets' I mean that for a connection 'in equilibrium', i.e., running stably with a full window of data in transit, the packet flow is what a physicist would call 'conservative': A new packet isn't put into the network until an old packet leaves. The physics of flow predicts that systems with this property should be robust in the face of congestion. Observation of the Internet suggests that it was not particularly robust. Why the discrepancy?There are only three ways for packet conservation to fail: The connection doesn't get to equilibrium, orA sender injects a new packet before an old packet has exited, orThe equilibrium can't be reached because of resource limits along the path. In the following sections, we treat each of these in turn.

5,615 citations


"Networking named content" refers background in this paper

  • ...A similar flow balance between data and ack packets is what gives TCP its scalability and adaptability [8] but, unlike TCP, CCN’s model works for many-to-many multipoint delivery (see Section 3....

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  • ...The TCP solution is for endpoints to dynamically adjust their window sizes to keep the aggregate traffic volume below the level where congestion occurs [8]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
John Kubiatowicz1, David Bindel1, Yan Chen1, Steven E. Czerwinski1  +8 moreInstitutions (1)
12 Nov 2000-
TL;DR: OceanStore monitoring of usage patterns allows adaptation to regional outages and denial of service attacks; monitoring also enhances performance through pro-active movement of data.
Abstract: OceanStore is a utility infrastructure designed to span the globe and provide continuous access to persistent information. Since this infrastructure is comprised of untrusted servers, data is protected through redundancy and cryptographic techniques. To improve performance, data is allowed to be cached anywhere, anytime. Additionally, monitoring of usage patterns allows adaptation to regional outages and denial of service attacks; monitoring also enhances performance through pro-active movement of data. A prototype implementation is currently under development.

3,357 citations


"Networking named content" refers background in this paper

  • ...ing effectively a self-certifying name [23, 25, 11, 8]), or by the identity (key) of its publisher [8, 29, 22, 21])....

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Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2001-
Abstract: We describe Freenet, an adaptive peer-to-peer network application that permits the publication, replication, and retrieval of data while protecting the anonymity of both authors and readers. Freenet operates as a network of identical nodes that collectively pool their storage space to store data files and cooperate to route requests to the most likely physical location of data. No broadcast search or centralized location index is employed. Files are referred to in a location-independent manner, and are dynamically replicated in locations near requestors and deleted from locations where there is no interest. It is infeasible to discover the true origin or destination of a file passing through the network, and difficult for a node operator to determine or be held responsible for the actual physical contents of her own node.

1,891 citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI
Teemu Koponen1, Mohit Chawla2, Byung-Gon Chun2, Andrey Ermolinskiy2  +3 moreInstitutions (3)
27 Aug 2007-
TL;DR: The Data-Oriented Network Architecture (DONA) is proposed, which involves a clean-slate redesign of Internet naming and name resolution to adapt to changes in Internet usage.
Abstract: The Internet has evolved greatly from its original incarnation. For instance, the vast majority of current Internet usage is data retrieval and service access, whereas the architecture was designed around host-to-host applications such as telnet and ftp. Moreover, the original Internet was a purely transparent carrier of packets, but now the various network stakeholders use middleboxes to improve security and accelerate applications. To adapt to these changes, we propose the Data-Oriented Network Architecture (DONA), which involves a clean-slate redesign of Internet naming and name resolution.

1,585 citations


"Networking named content" refers background or methods in this paper

  • ...The Data-Oriented Network Architecture [21] replaces DNS names with flat, self-certifying names and a namebased anycast primitive above the IP layer....

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  • ...ing effectively a self-certifying name [23, 25, 11, 8]), or by the identity (key) of its publisher [8, 29, 22, 21])....

    [...]


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Performance
Metrics
No. of citations received by the Paper in previous years
YearCitations
20224
2021108
2020182
2019203
2018273
2017327