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Journal ArticleDOI

“NO CONFLICT OF PRINCIPLE”: The patriotic rhetoric of Anglo-Jewish sermons during the Boer War

01 Nov 2004-Journal of Modern Jewish Studies (Taylor & Francis Group)-Vol. 3, Iss: 3, pp 289-305
TL;DR: This paper used Jewish sermons as a case study for understanding the established British Jewish community's response to the Boer War (1899-1902) and argued that the clergy's unflinchingly martial posture was not simply defensive or reactive.
Abstract: The period of the Boer, or South African, War (1899–1902) has generated remarkably little interest amongst scholars of Anglo-Jewish history. Historians of British anti-Semitism have found fruitful ground in the controversy of alleged Jewish culpability for the war and the amplified climate of anti-Jewish (ostensibly anti-immigrant) sentiment. But, while telling us a great deal about how some segments of the British public regarded Jews, these studies have done little to illuminate how British Jews themselves thought and behaved. This article will make a first step towards redressing these imbalances, using Jewish sermons as a case study for understanding the established community's response to the war. Though a climate of insecurity undoubtedly existed, I will argue that the clergy's unflinchingly martial posture—which was representative of elite Jewish opinion as well—was not simply defensive or reactive. The clergy also saw the war as providing an ideal opportunity to express genuine gratitude and patri...
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Feldman as mentioned in this paper investigates the reality of Jewish integration more rigorously than any previous study, and addresses the central questions arising from the Jewish presence in England, including the extent did English society accept or reject the Jewish minority within it.
Abstract: Book synopsis: This book presents an important new perspective on Jews in England - and English attitudes towards them - during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This was a period of fundamental change. At the accession of Queen Victoria, Jews in England were a small and disadvantaged minority, numbering no more than 30,000 and excluded from parliament. By the early twentieth century, political and legal disabilities had been almost completely abolished, the Jewish population grown tenfold, and mass immigration from eastern Europe had changed the face of Anglo-Jewry. In exploring these fundamental changes David Feldman investigates the reality of Jewish integration more rigorously than any previous study, and addresses the central questions arising from the Jewish presence in England. To what extent did English society accept or reject the Jewish minority within it? How did the Jews' religious, communal and political identities develop in the English context? What was the impact of immigration, and how did the immigrants fare within the English economy? 'Englishmen and Jews' draws on a wide range of source materials in both English and Yiddish. Its chapters span political, religious, economic and social history. It deals with arguments between Whigs and Tories over Jewish emancipation and with the turbulent political life of the Jewish East End of London, with anti-semitic assaults on Disraeli and with the travails of the immigrant sweatshop workers. Above all, it reshapes our understanding of the connections between English and Jewish history during this period. By seeing each in the context provided by the other it enables us to see both in new ways, and adds strikingly to the debates on national identity and liberalism, and on class and community in pre-1914 English society. 'Ambitious and highly sophisticated ...A great achievement providing a well-researched and analytically sharp account.' Tony Kushner, History Today 'A stimulating and innovative study ...Ambitious in scope and range of concerns.' Thomas Linehan, Jewish Quarterly 'Feldman makes a heroically fair-minded effort to understand opponents of emancipation and unrestricted immigration on their own terms ...On the whole, it is a happy story that he has to tell.' John Gross, Sunday Telegraph Dr. David Feldman is a member of the School of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck College, the University of London.

13 citations

Dissertation
01 Jan 2015
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a method to solve the problem of "uniformity" and "uncertainty" in the context of health care, and propose a solution.
Abstract: viii

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article reviewed Jewish sermons delivered by British preachers mobilizing the rhetorical resources of Jewish and general literatures to express absolute faithfulness to the United Kingdom during the First World War.
Abstract: Beginning in the eighteenth century, occasions related to war became a significant new venue for Jewish preaching. The declaration of war or its conclusion, a government‐proclaimed Day of National Fasting and Prayer or of Thanksgiving, a major victory or defeat of the nation’s armed forces – all generated sermons by Jewish preachers, who not infrequently publicized what they said beyond the synagogue walls. These sermons reflect the patriotic identification of Jews with the nation where they resided, the desire to demonstrate this loyalty to the larger society, the homiletical application of classical texts and historical precedents to new situations, the challenge presented by war to assumptions about human progress, the theological conundrum of enemy nations praying for victory to the same God, the poignant agony of Jews fighting against other Jews. This article reviews Jewish sermons delivered by British preachers mobilizing the rhetorical resources of Jewish and general literatures to express absolute...

9 citations

References
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Book
29 Apr 1983
TL;DR: This article explored examples of this process of invention -the creation of Welsh Scottish national culture, the elaboration of British royal rituals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the origins of imperial ritual in British India and Africa, and the attempts by radical movements to develop counter-traditions of their own.
Abstract: Many of the traditions which we think of as very ancient in their origins were not in fact sanctioned by long usage over the centuries, but were invented comparative recently. This book explores examples of this process of invention - the creation of Welsh Scottish 'national culture'; the elaboration of British royal rituals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the origins of imperial ritual in British India and Africa; and the attempts by radical movements to develop counter-traditions of their own. This book addresses the complex interaction of past and present, bringing together historicans and anthropologists in a fascinating study of ritual and symbolism which possess new questions for the understanding of our history.

7,291 citations

Book
01 Jan 1979
TL;DR: In this article, Beauty meets the Prince of her dreams, the one man whose touch can release the torrential passions locked within her, and as with the best of fairy tales, they are destined to live ecstatically ever after.
Abstract: Beauty has learned her lessons well. There are no pleasures that she hasn't given, no delights she hasn't known - but there can be no freedom for her. It means she must deny her body the joy it expects, the excitement it so desperately craves. Now as our story nears its end, Beauty meets the Prince of her dreams - the one man whose touch can release the torrential passions locked within her. And, as with the best of fairy tales, they are destined to live ecstatically ever after. Beauty's Release: her climactic adventure.

266 citations

Book
01 Jun 1986
TL;DR: Englishness and the National Culture: Englishness and National Culture as discussed by the authors, a literature for Englishness: A Literature for English Peter Brooker (University of Nottingham, UK) and Peter Widdowson (formerly University of Gloucestershire, UK), author of English and Englishness (1989).
Abstract: Introduction Englishness and the National Culture Philip Dodd (University of the Arts, London, UK) Englishness and the Political Culture Robert Colls (De Montfort University, UK) The Discovery of Rural England Alun Howkins (University of Sussex, UK) The Invention of English Brian Doyle (1943-1997), author of English and Englishness (1989) A Literature for England Peter Brooker (University of Nottingham, UK) and Peter Widdowson (formerly University of Gloucestershire, UK) The Identity of English Music: The Reception of Elgar 1898-1935 Jeremy Crump (De Montfort University, UK) The Englishwoman Alice Mackay (independent scholar, UK) and Pat Thane (King's College, London, UK) The Marginal Britons: The Irish D George Boyce (University of Swansea, UK) Englishness and the Liberal Inheritance After 1886 Dennis Smith (University of Loughborough, UK) The Conservative Party and Patriotism Hugh Cunningham (University of Kent, UK) Socialism, the State and Some Oppositional Englishness Stephen Yeo (formerly University of Oxford, UK) Afterword Index

153 citations

Book
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: Feldman as discussed by the authors investigates the reality of Jewish integration more rigorously than any previous study, and addresses the central questions arising from the Jewish presence in England, including the extent did English society accept or reject the Jewish minority within it.
Abstract: Book synopsis: This book presents an important new perspective on Jews in England - and English attitudes towards them - during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This was a period of fundamental change. At the accession of Queen Victoria, Jews in England were a small and disadvantaged minority, numbering no more than 30,000 and excluded from parliament. By the early twentieth century, political and legal disabilities had been almost completely abolished, the Jewish population grown tenfold, and mass immigration from eastern Europe had changed the face of Anglo-Jewry. In exploring these fundamental changes David Feldman investigates the reality of Jewish integration more rigorously than any previous study, and addresses the central questions arising from the Jewish presence in England. To what extent did English society accept or reject the Jewish minority within it? How did the Jews' religious, communal and political identities develop in the English context? What was the impact of immigration, and how did the immigrants fare within the English economy? 'Englishmen and Jews' draws on a wide range of source materials in both English and Yiddish. Its chapters span political, religious, economic and social history. It deals with arguments between Whigs and Tories over Jewish emancipation and with the turbulent political life of the Jewish East End of London, with anti-semitic assaults on Disraeli and with the travails of the immigrant sweatshop workers. Above all, it reshapes our understanding of the connections between English and Jewish history during this period. By seeing each in the context provided by the other it enables us to see both in new ways, and adds strikingly to the debates on national identity and liberalism, and on class and community in pre-1914 English society. 'Ambitious and highly sophisticated ...A great achievement providing a well-researched and analytically sharp account.' Tony Kushner, History Today 'A stimulating and innovative study ...Ambitious in scope and range of concerns.' Thomas Linehan, Jewish Quarterly 'Feldman makes a heroically fair-minded effort to understand opponents of emancipation and unrestricted immigration on their own terms ...On the whole, it is a happy story that he has to tell.' John Gross, Sunday Telegraph Dr. David Feldman is a member of the School of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck College, the University of London.

122 citations

Book
03 Jun 1999
TL;DR: Endelman as mentioned in this paper argues that the modernization of European Jewry encompassed far more than an intellectual revolution in Germany by Moses Mendelssohn in the second half of the eighteenth century as the decisive event in the origins of Jewish modernity.
Abstract: The movement from tradition to modernity engulfed all of the Jewish communities in the West, but hitherto historians have concentrated on the intellectual revolution in Germany by Moses Mendelssohn in the second half of the eighteenth century as the decisive event in the origins of Jewish modernity. In "The Jews of Georgian England," Todd M. Endelman challenges the Germanocentric orientation of the bulk of modern Jewish historiography and argues that the modernization of European Jewry encompassed far more than an intellectual revolution.His study recounts the rise of the Anglo-Jewish elite--great commercial and financial magnates such as the Goldsmids, the Franks, Samson Gideon, and Joseph Salvador--who rapidly adopted the gentlemanly style of life of the landed class and adjusted their religious practices to harmonize with the standards of upper-class Englishmen. Similarly, the Jewish poor--peddlers, hawkers, and old-clothes men--took easily to many patterns of lower-class life, including crime, street violence, sexual promiscuity, and coarse entertainment.An impressive marshaling of fact and analysis, "The Jews of Georgian England" serves to illuminate a significant aspect of the Jewish passage to modernity."Contributes to English as well as Jewish history. . . . Every reader will learn something new about the statistics, setting or mores of Jewish life in the eighteenth century. . . ." --"American Historical Review"Todd M. Endelman is William Haber Professor of Modern Jewish History, University of Michigan. He is also the author of "Comparing Jewish Societies, Jewish Apostasy in the Modern World," and "Radical Assimilation in English Jewish History, 1656-1945."

82 citations