scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question

Non-breeding feeding ecology of territorial bonellis eagles hieraaetus fasciatus in the iberian peninsula ecología trófica de las águilas-azor perdiceras hieraaetus fasciatus territoriales durante el periodo no reproductor en la península ibérica

TL;DR: The diet of non-breeding period has proved to influence the healthy of birds, body condition and the reproductive output in the subsequent breeding attempt as mentioned in this paper, leading to a strong limitation of both density and survival of a number of bird species.
Abstract: raptors remains largely unknown since most of diet studies are usually restricted to a half of the year, the breeding season, probably due to the easiness for recovering food data related to the association of individuals to nesting sites. Contrary, during the non-breeding season birds are difficult to locate and information on diet is scarce, causing lack in overall knowledge and comprehension of feeding habits (Cramp and Simmons, 1980; del Hoyo et al., 1994; Ferguson-Lees and Christie, 2001). Because of food is one of the main limiting factors for birds of prey (Newton, 1979), this shortage in basic information during a long life-period of such species should be urgently addressed. In this sense, the diet of nonbreeding period have proved to influence the healthy of birds, body condition and the reproductive output in the subsequent breeding attempt (Newton, 1979; Gonzalez, 1991), finally leading to a strong limitation of both density and survival of a number of bird species (see a review in Newton, 1998). Hence the study on non-breeding diet in raptors, a group of species usually threatened (del Hoyo et al., 1994; Tucker and Heath, 1994), is not only an important aspect to promote the ecology knowledge but also a necessary tool to plan adequately conservation measures. The Bonelli s eagle Hieraaetus fasciatus is an endangered bird of prey (Tucker and Heath, 1994; Real, 2004) inhabiting the Mediterranean coast, Middle East and southern Asia (del Hoyo et al., 1994; Ferguson-Lees and Christie, 2001). Dietary studies on this species are frequently related to the breeding season and restricted around European continent (Jordano, 1981; Palma et al., 1984; Fernandez and Insausti, 1986; Real, 1987; Salvo, 1988; Simeon and Wilhelm, 1988; Rico et al., 1990; Real, 1991; Gil-Sanchez et al., 1994; Leiva et al., 1994; NON-BREEDING FEEDING ECOLOGY OF TERRITORIAL BONELLI S EAGLES HIERAAETUS FASCIATUS IN THE IBERIAN PENINSULA
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2010-Ibis
TL;DR: Bonelli's Eagle Aquila fasciata is one of the rarest birds of prey in Europe, where it has suffered a significant decline in recent decades as discussed by the authors, and the home ranges and spatial parameters of 18 Bonelli's Eagles radiotracked in 2002-2006 in Catalonia (northeast Spain) and describe the home-range probability kernel, distances moved, breeding area eccentricity, territorial overlap, nearest neighbour distance and breeding site fidelity.
Abstract: Bonelli’s Eagle Aquila fasciata is one of the rarest birds of prey in Europe, where it has suffered a significant decline in recent decades. We present information on the homeranges and spatial parameters of 18 Bonelli’s Eagles radiotracked in 2002–2006 in Catalonia (northeast Spain) and describe the home-range probability kernel, distances moved, breeding area eccentricity, territorial overlap, nearest neighbour distance and breeding site fidelity, and assess the influence of sex, breeding status, season and geographical area on these parameters. Median home-range according to the minimum convex polygon (MCP) and 95% kernel were 50.3 and 36.1 km 2 , respectively. The median breeding area eccentricity was 1477 m. There was considerable overlap in the home-range of both sexes within pairs (MCP: 71.4% and 95% kernel: 98.5%), indicating close pair bonding and similar foraging patterns. Overlap in home-ranges of up to 15% between neighbouring individuals also occurred and was positively related to breeding pair density. There was no difference in spatial parameters between sexes or with breeding status, but during the non-breeding season Eagles had larger home-ranges and stayed further from nests. The high consistency across birds suggests a pattern of spatial use that is characteristic of this species. The high level of use of breeding areas and their surroundings (50% kernel) throughout the year makes it important that these areas be protected from human disturbance. Additionally, it is necessary that heavily used areas away from nesting sites, which are used for foraging and roosting, are identified, protected and managed in a sustainable fashion.

72 citations


Cites background from "Non-breeding feeding ecology of ter..."

  • ...This change in the use of space with respect to the season coincides with the specific foraging patterns and different prey consumed outside the breeding season (Real 1991, Moleón et al. 2007)....

    [...]

  • ...A demographic imbalance related to increased adult and sub-adult mortality and ⁄ or decreased fecundity have been proposed (Real & Mañosa 1997, Rico et al. 1999, Real et al. 2001, Carrete et al. 2002a, Penteriani et al. 2003, Moleón et al. 2007)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is suggested that pellet and prey remains analyses under‐represent the role of carrion in the diet of avian predators in Mediterranean ecosystems.
Abstract: Capsule Golden Eagles consumed more carrion than shown by traditional analyses. Aims To determine whether the traditional methods for diet determination in avian predators are subject to biases in relation to the consumption of carrion. Methods The consumption by Golden Eagles of ungulate carcasses supplied through sport hunting in a typical Mediterranean area of southeast Spain was monitored by camera trapping through an entire year. We simultaneously analysed the breeding diet of three Eagle pairs by conventional procedures. Results Golden Eagles regularly used ungulate carrion in the study area, benefiting from 57% of the available carcasses. Ninety percent of the territorial eagles fed on monitored carcasses, and the consumption was similar through the year. However, this source of food comprised only 1.5–9.1% of the prey items identified by traditional methods. Conclusions Our findings suggest that pellet and prey remains analyses under‐represent the role of carrion in the diet of avian predators in ...

41 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Type II, non-regulatory, functional responses (typical of specialist predators) offered the best fitting models for both prey and, in the absence of a numerical response, Bonelli’s eagle role as a regulating factor of rabbit and partridge populations seems to be weak in this study area.
Abstract: How predators impact on prey population dynamics is still an unsolved issue for most wild predator–prey communities. When considering vertebrates, important concerns constrain a comprehensive understanding of the functioning of predator–prey relationships worldwide; e.g. studies simultaneously quantifying ‘functional’ and ‘numerical responses’ (i.e., the ‘total response’) are rare. The functional, the numerical, and the resulting total response (i.e., how the predator per capita intake, the population of predators and the total of prey eaten by the total predators vary with prey densities) are fundamental as they reveal the predator’s ability to regulate prey population dynamics. Here, we used a multi-spatio-temporal scale approach to simultaneously explore the functional and numerical responses of a territorial predator (Bonelli’s eagle Hieraaetus fasciatus) to its two main prey species (the rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus and the red-legged partridge Alectoris rufa) during the breeding period in a Mediterranean system of south Spain. Bonelli’s eagle responded functionally, but not numerically, to rabbit/partridge density changes. Type II, non-regulatory, functional responses (typical of specialist predators) offered the best fitting models for both prey. In the absence of a numerical response, Bonelli’s eagle role as a regulating factor of rabbit and partridge populations seems to be weak in our study area. Simple (prey density-dependent) functional response models may well describe the short-term variation in a territorial predator’s consumption rate in complex ecosystems.

39 citations


Cites background or result from "Non-breeding feeding ecology of ter..."

  • ...…of specialisation in partridges in our study is that the greater vulnerability of male partridges during the breeding season, due to their conspicuous behaviour (frequently singing on unprotected, highly visible perches), would make them readily visible to hunting eagles (Moleón et al. 2007)....

    [...]

  • ...Indeed, the RFS hypothesis postulates that Bonelli’s eagles prefer rabbits when they are relatively abundant, but shift to other similar prey species when rabbits become scarce (Moleón et al. 2007, 2009)....

    [...]

  • ...…not only with the previously found negative selection of this prey in Granada (Gil-Sánchez 1998) but also with the ideas formulated in previous studies, which suggested the possibility of pigeons being less proWtable to Bonelli’s eagle than rabbits and partridges (Moleón et al. 2007, 2009)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The use of digital trail cameras are recommended as an efficient, non-intrusive method to study the diet of cliff-nesting raptors, given that, in combination with traditional methods, it facilitates estimation of dietary composition in an objective, economic, contrastable and unbiased manner.
Abstract: The study of avian diet is one of the most commonly discussed topics in Ornithology. Different methods such as direct observations of hunting, analysis of pellets and collection of prey remains have usually been employed to study avian diet. Fortunately, digital technologies have rapidly advanced in recent years, allowing researchers to increase our understanding of avian behaviour. Here we report the outcomes of a pilot project to study the diet of Bonelli's eagle (Aquila fasciata, Syn = Hieraaetus fasciatus) during the nestling period using digital trail cameras. We describe the monitoring system, provide results on dietary composition and discuss advantages and shortcomings of the method employed. Our results show that the main prey delivered to nests were pigeons (Columba spp.) and common rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). One advantage of the method is the relative low cost of the material employed in contrast to digital video cameras. Disadvantages were the limited duration of power supply of...

17 citations


Cites background from "Non-breeding feeding ecology of ter..."

  • ...…the diet of this species across its range, both during the breeding (Jordano 1981; Palma et al. 1984, 2006; Simeon & Wilhelm 1988; Real 1991; Martínez et al. 1994; Gil-Sánchez 1998; Gil-Sánchez et al. 2000, 2004) and the non-breeding season (Cheylan 1977; Iezekiel et al. 2004; Moleón et al. 2007)....

    [...]

References
More filters
Book
01 Oct 2010
TL;DR: Family Thraupidae (Tanagers), Family Cardinalidae (Cardinals), Family Emberizidae (Buntings and New World Sparrows), Family Icteridae (New World Blackbirds).
Abstract: Family Thraupidae (Tanagers), Family Cardinalidae (Cardinals), Family Emberizidae (Buntings and New World Sparrows), Family Icteridae (New World Blackbirds).

3,863 citations

01 Jan 1977
TL;DR: The Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa: The Birds of the Western Palearctic by CRAMP, Stanley et al. as mentioned in this paper is a great selection.
Abstract: 1983 — Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. The Birds of Western Palearctic, vol. 3 — Oxford University Press, Oxford, 913 pp. Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa: The Birds of the Western Palearctic by CRAMP, Stanley et al. (eds) and a great selection. AERC TAC Checklist of bird taxa occurring in Western Palearctic region, 15th Draft. Available at: Handbook of the birds of Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The birds of the North Atlantic Oscillation and timing of spring migration in birds.

3,645 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Predation, one such process that affects numbers, forms the subject of the present paper and is based on the density-dependence concept of Smith ( 1955) and the competition theory of Nicholson (1933).
Abstract: The fluctuation of an animal's numbers between restricted limits is determined by a balance between that animal's capacity to increase and the environmenta1 cheks to this increase. Many authors have indulged in the calculating the propressive increase of a population when no checks nrerc operating. Thus Huxley calculated that the progeny of a single Aphis in the course of 10 generations, supposing all survived,would “contain more ponderable substance than five hundred millions of stout men; that is, more than the whole population of China”, (in Thompson, 1929). Checks, however, do occur and it has been the subject of much controversy to determine how these checks operate. Certain general principles—the density-dependence concept of Smith ( 1955) , the competition theory of Nicholson (1933)—have been proposed both verbally and mathematically, but because they have been based in part upon untested and restrictive assumptions they have been severelv criticized (e.g. Andrewartha and Birch 1954). These problems could be considerably clarified if we knew the mode of operation of each process that affects numbers, if we knew its basic and subsidiary components. predation, one such process, forms the subject of the present paper.

3,087 citations


"Non-breeding feeding ecology of ter..." refers result in this paper

  • ...This situation would fit with the sigmoidal Type III functional response (Holling, 1959), and is therefore not consistent with the specialist Type II found in southern Portugal by Palma et al....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Relationship between the sexes dispersion breeding density winter density problems concerning nest-sites breeding strategies breeding rates behaviour in the breeding season fidelity to breeding areas movements mortality human persecution DDT and other organo-chlorines other pollutants and pesticides conservation management breeding from captive birds scientific names of raptors.
Abstract: Relationship between the sexes dispersion breeding density winter density problems concerning nest-sites breeding strategies breeding rates behaviour in the breeding season fidelity to breeding areas movements mortality human persecution DDT and other organo-chlorines other pollutants and pesticides conservation management breeding from captive birds scientific names of raptors.

2,115 citations


"Non-breeding feeding ecology of ter..." refers background in this paper

  • ...In this sense, the diet of nonbreeding period have proved to influence the healthy of birds, body condition and the reproductive output in the subsequent breeding attempt (Newton, 1979; González, 1991), finally leading to a strong limitation of both density and survival of a number of bird species (see a review in Newton, 1998)....

    [...]

  • ...Because of food is one of the main limiting factors for birds of prey (Newton, 1979), this shortage in basic information during a long life-period of such species should be urgently addressed....

    [...]

Book
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: This book discusses Habitat and Density Regulation, Habitat Fragments and Metapopulations, and Interactions Between Different Limiting Factors.
Abstract: Preview. Behaviour and Density Regulation: Social Systems and Status. Habitat and Density Regulation. Territorial Behaviour and Density Limitation. Density Dependence in Bird Populations. Habitat Fragments and Metapopulations. Natural Limiting Factors: Food-Supply. Nest-Sites. Predation. Parasites and Pathogens. Weather. Inter-Specific Competition. Interactions Between Different Limiting Factors. Human Impacts: Hunting and Pest Control. Pesticides and Pollutants. Extinction. Bibliography. Index.

2,041 citations