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Journal ArticleDOI

Non-Iranian historical lands in Pahlavi literature

01 Oct 2019-Bulletin of The School of Oriental and African Studies-university of London (Cambridge University Press)-Vol. 82, Iss: 3, pp 453-472
TL;DR: In this article, the authors of Ayadgǫr ǫm Ãǫǫ rǫ i Jǫ spǫg devotes several chapters to an extensive account of the landscape, social customs and religious practices of India, China, Arabia, Barbary, Ceylon (or the region of Slavs), Mazandarān and Turkestan.
Abstract: Although Zoroastrian Pahlavi literature preserves few geographical and ethnographic descriptions of non-Iranian historical regions, the popular book Ayādgār ī Jāmāspīg devotes several chapters to an extensive account of the landscape, social customs and religious practices of India, China, Arabia, Barbary, Ceylon (or the region of Slavs), Mazandarān and Turkestan. These descriptions share many similarities with the accounts of Muslim geographers between the ninth and twelfth centuries ce, though they also contain many Late Sasanian elements. In providing an English translation of these passages, this article aims to identify the inhabitants of these regions as well as to provide a more precise chronology of the chapters. It argues that Zoroastrian authors in the first centuries of the Islamic era, taking as a model the new Islamic science of geography, wrote or reworked these chapters with the intention of redefining and mapping the new world around them.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a table of Chinese Dynasties and a glossary of Chinese Names and Titles, with a focus on the maturity and acceptance of Chinese dynasties.
Abstract: CONTENTS: Preface. Table of Chinese Dynasties. Maps of Dynasties. Introduction, Growth and Domestication. Maturity and Acceptance. Decline. Conclusion. Glossary. Chinese Names and Titles. Bibliography. Index.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
15 May 2004
TL;DR: In this paper, le bref traite pehlevi sur les “Capitales provinciales de l’Ērānsahr”, datant de l'epoque post-sassanide, n’avait plus fait l'objet d'une etude approfondie jusqu'a ce que Rika Gyselen en confrontât les donnees avec celles des sceaux et bulles administratifs (dans St. Bures-sur
Abstract: Depuis l’edition critique commentee par Josef Markwart (publiee de maniere posthume par G. Messina en 1931), le bref traite pehlevi sur les “Capitales provinciales de l’Ērānsahr”, datant de l’epoque post-sassanide, n’avait plus fait l’objet d’une etude approfondie jusqu’a ce que Rika Gyselen en confrontât les donnees avec celles des sceaux et bulles administratifs (dans St. Ir 17, (1988), pp. 191-206 et La geographie administrative de l’empire sassanide. Res Orientales I. Bures-sur-Yvette, 19...

2 citations

01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: This paper annotated columns VI-X and XXII of the Chinese side of the trilingual inscription of Qarabalghasun (early 9th century), which is the principal source on the Uighurs adoption of Manichaeism as a State religion between the 8th and the 10th centuries.
Abstract: The essay offers an annotated translation of columns VI-X and XXII of the Chinese side of the trilingual inscription of Qarabalghasun (early 9th century), which is the principal source on the Uighurs’ adoption of Manichaeism as a State religion between the 8th and the 10th centuries. The inscription had been integrally translated by G. Schlegel in 1896 (in German) and, for the section concerning Manichaeism, by E. Chavannes and P. Pelliot in 1913 (in French). The new translation, which is accompanied by an introduction and a lengthy historical commentary, is meant to supersede these studies. Through a closer scrutiny of the Chinese text, and using several documents from Central Asia discovered in the course of the 20th century, it reaches a substantially revised understanding of this significant episode in the religious history of Central Asia. Rather than a historically accurate record of the introduction of Manichaeism among the Uighurs, as it has long been taken to be, the inscription is revealed as a document of the ideological struggle between the Uighur Qaghan and the aristocracy, with the Manichaean religion playing the role of an instrumentum regni to bolster the autocratic claims of the former.

1 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1964
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a table of Chinese Dynasties and a glossary of Chinese Names and Titles, with a focus on the maturity and acceptance of Chinese dynasties.
Abstract: CONTENTS: Preface. Table of Chinese Dynasties. Maps of Dynasties. Introduction, Growth and Domestication. Maturity and Acceptance. Decline. Conclusion. Glossary. Chinese Names and Titles. Bibliography. Index.

214 citations

Book
01 Jan 1984

201 citations

BookDOI
01 Jan 1983

176 citations


"Non-Iranian historical lands in Pah..." refers background in this paper

  • ...41 For a survey of the main studies about the mythical and historical geographical location of Mazandarān, see Yarshater 1983: 446–7....

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MonographDOI
01 Jan 2006

160 citations