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Journal ArticleDOI

Norbert Elias, the civilizing process and penal development in modern society

John Pratt1
01 Jun 2011-The Sociological Review (SAGE PublicationsSage UK: London, England)-Vol. 59, pp 220-240
TL;DR: For much of the twentieth century the punishment of offenders in modern society came to be administered on a scientific, rational basis with policy driven largely by expert knowledge as mentioned in this paper, and the anonymity of the prison, as a place for reflection and rehabilitation, steadily replaced the pre-modern drama and spectacle of punishment to the human body.
Abstract: For much of the twentieth century the punishment of offenders in modern society came to be administered on a scientific, rational basis with policy driven largely by expert knowledge. The anonymity of the prison, as a place for reflection and rehabilitation, steadily replaced the pre-modern drama and spectacle of punishment to the human body. Recently, though, some modern societies (particularly those in the Anglophone world) have seen recourse to more expressive and severe penalties, driven more by public opinion than by expert knowledge. Other modern societies, however (particularly the Scandinavian countries) remain largely immune to these trends. This article outlines and explores these contrasting trends and developments and uses Norbert Elias's work on the civilizing process to explain them.
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TL;DR: In this article, a study in social theory studies in crime and justice book that will find the money for you worth, get the no question best seller from us currently from several preferred authors.
Abstract: If you ally infatuation such a referred punishment and modern society a study in social theory studies in crime and justice book that will find the money for you worth, get the no question best seller from us currently from several preferred authors. If you desire to witty books, lots of novels, tale, jokes, and more fictions collections are then launched, from best seller to one of the most current released.

54 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The concept of "sensible drinking" is poorly defined and has not been widely accepted by the general public as discussed by the authors, however, it has received considerable attention in policy, media and academic debates.
Abstract: While the real and perceived excesses of ‘binge drinking’ have received considerable attention in policy, media and academic debates, the concept of ‘sensible drinking’ is poorly defined and has ra...

32 citations


Cites background from "Norbert Elias, the civilizing proce..."

  • ...As Pratt (2011) observes in relation to law and order framing narratives such as Tony Blaire’s invocation of ‘yob culture’ as societal breakdown, and more specifically as Plant and Plant (2009) explore in the pitch and tone of tabloid media reporting on ‘binge drinking’, the act of positioning the…...

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References
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Book
01 Jan 2000
TL;DR: Putnam as mentioned in this paper showed that changes in work, family structure, age, suburban life, television, computers, women's roles and other factors are isolating Americans from each other in a trend whose reflection can clearly be seen in British society.
Abstract: BOWLING ALONE warns Americans that their stock of "social capital", the very fabric of their connections with each other, has been accelerating down. Putnam describes the resulting impoverishment of their lives and communities. Drawing on evidence that includes nearly half a million interviews conducted over a quarter of a century in America, Putnam shows how changes in work, family structure, age, suburban life, television, computers, women's roles and other factors are isolating Americans from each other in a trend whose reflection can clearly be seen in British society. We sign 30 percent fewer petitions than we did ten years ago. Membership in organisations- from the Boy Scouts to political parties and the Church is falling. Ties with friends and relatives are fraying: we're 35 percent less likely to visit our neighbours or have dinner with our families than we were thirty years ago. We watch sport alone instead of with our friends. A century ago, American citizens' means of connecting were at a low point after decades of urbanisation, industrialisation and immigration uprooted them from families and friends. That generation demonstrated a capacity for renewal by creating the organisations that pulled Americans together. Putnam shows how we can learn from them and reinvent common enterprises that will make us secure, productive, happy and hopeful.

24,532 citations

Book
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: Fukuyama as discussed by the authors argued that the end of the Cold War would also mean the beginning of a struggle for position in the rapidly emerging order of 21st-century capitalism and argued that in an era when social capital may be as important as physical capital, only those societies with a high degree of social trust will be able to create the flexible, large scale business organizations that are needed to compete in the new global economy.
Abstract: In his bestselling "The End of History and the Last Man", Francis Fukuyama argued that the end of the Cold War would also mean the beginning of a struggle for position in the rapidly emerging order of 21st-century capitalism. In "Trust", a penetrating assessment of the emerging global economic order "after History", he explains the social principles of economic life and tells us what we need to know to win the coming struggle for world dominance. Challenging orthodoxies of both the left and right, Fukuyama examines a wide range of national cultures in order to divine the underlying principles that foster social and economic prosperity. Insisting that we cannot divorce economic life from cultural life, he contends that in an era when social capital may be as important as physical capital, only those societies with a high degree of social trust will be able to create the flexible, large-scale business organizations that are needed to compete in the new global economy. A brilliant study of the interconnectedness of economic life with cultural life, "Trust" is also an essential antidote to the increasing drift of American culture into extreme forms of individualism, which, if unchecked, will have dire consequences for the nation's economic health.

7,506 citations

Journal Article

3,713 citations


"Norbert Elias, the civilizing proce..." refers background in this paper

  • ...As Beck (1992), Fukuyama (1995) and Putnam (2000) have noted, many of the longstanding institutions and cultural expectations that had become deeply embedded in these societies in the twentieth century have declined: job security, the stability of family life, and membership of trade unions,…...

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Book
01 Jan 1989
TL;DR: The family model of the criminal process: reintegrative shaming as discussed by the authors is a theory of white-collar crime that is based on the theory of the family model and the social conditions conducive to reintegration.
Abstract: Preface 1. Whither criminological theory? 2. The dominant theoretical traditions: labeling, subcultural, control, opportunity and learning theories 3. Facts a theory of crime ought to fit 4. The family model of the criminal process: reintegrative shaming 5. Why and how does shaming work? 6. Social conditions conducive to reintegrative shaming 7. Summary of the theory 8. Testing the theory 9. Reintegrative shaming and white collar crime 10. Shaming and the good society References Index.

3,169 citations

Book
01 Jan 1939
TL;DR: In this paper, the sociogenesis of the concepts "civilization" and "culture" and the development of the concept of "civilite" are discussed. But the focus of the article is not on the social evolution of human behaviour, but rather on the evolution of social relations between the sexes.
Abstract: Part 1 On the Sociogenesis of the Concepts "Civilization" and "Culture": 1 Sociogenesis of the Difference between "Kultur" and "Zivilization" in German Usage 2 Sociogenesis of the Concept of Civilization in France. Part 2 Civilization as a Specific Transformation of Human Behaviour 3 The Development of the Concept of "Civilite" 4 On Medieval Manners 5 The Problem of Change in Behaviour during the Renaissance 6 On Behaviour at Table 7 Changes in Attitude toward the Natural Functions 8 On Blowing One's Nose 9 On Spitting 10 On Behaviour in the Bedroom 11 Changes in Attitude toward Relations between the Sexes 12 On Changes in Aggressiveness 13 Scenes from the Life of a Knight. Part 3 Feudalization and State Formation: 14 Introduction 15 Dynamics of Feudalization 16 On the Sociogenesis of the State. Part 4 Synopsis 17 Towards a Theory of the Civilizing Process.

2,221 citations