scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Journal ArticleDOI

Note sur la réception du Testament d’Abrahamdans la tradition arabo-islamique

04 May 2020-Der Islam (De Gruyter)-Vol. 97, Iss: 1, pp 43-63
TL;DR: In this article, the reception of parabiblical narratives in hadith literature and Islamic historiography is investigated, taking the Testament of Abraham as a case study, and analyzing a particular literary motif shared by this text and an early version of the miʿrāǧ (Ascension) of the Prophet Muhammad.
Abstract: Abstract This brief note aims at contributing to the study of the reception of parabiblical narratives in hadith literature and Islamic historiography. Taking the Testament of Abraham as a case study, it sets out to analyse a particular literary motif shared by this text and an early version of the miʿrāǧ (Ascension) of the Prophet Muhammad. The comparative analysis demonstrates that the Testament of Abraham could have provided a number of elements for the redaction of at least one particular section of the miʿrāǧ. This hypothesis finds support in other cases of textual correspondence between several sections of the Testament of Abraham and other Islamic works such as the Tafsīr of Muqātil ibn Sulaymān (d. 150/767), the unedited Kitāb Mubtadaʾ al-dunyā wa-qiṣaṣ al-anbiyāʾ of Abū Ḥuḏayfa al-Buḫārī Isḥāq ibn Bišr (d. 206/821) and Ibn ʿAsākir’s Taʾrīḫ madīnat Dimašq (d. 571/1176). The examined material thus throws additional light on the continuity between late antique apocrypha and nascent Arabic literature.
Citations
More filters
Book ChapterDOI
01 Aug 2013
TL;DR: In this article, the authors highlight what is presently at stake in Qur'anic studies, what are the pitfalls we have to beware of and how we can break a path through the thicket of contradicting scholarly positions in order to restore the image of the Qur'an as a text that concerns culturally and religiously committed individuals in general.
Abstract: Why do we need a scholarly reading of the Qur’an? Not perhaps for the sake of a spiritually deeper Muslim understanding. But maybe for the sake of reclaiming the Qur’an’s universal significance, to remind of its message as raḥmatan li’lālamīn, as addressed ultimately to all mankind. And perhaps, most importantly, for preserving its integrity, correcting present misconceptions. The scholarly reading of the Qur’an today then is a politically relevant task. In the following, I wish to highlight what is presently at stake in Qur’anic studies, what are the pitfalls we have to beware of and how we can break a path through the thicket of contradicting scholarly positions in order to restore the image of the Qur’an as a text that concerns culturally and religiously committed individuals in general. Allow me to start with a short gaze back: Until a few decades ago, Qur’anic studies in the West was an “exotic” discipline housed under the wide roof of Oriental Studies, which was then still dominated by “philology”, i.e. textual investigations into Arabic literary and historical works ranging from the 5 th century to the present. In the seventies, however, a parting of the ways occurred, separating textual studies, “philology”, from “area studies”. This new field of area studies –not least thanks to its surplus value as a provider of geopolitically relevant knowledge about the Middle East– came to prevail pushing aside textual studies, “philology” that appeared out-dated, antiquarian and a-political. Not only for pragmatic reasons but ideological as well. Edward Said’s seminal work Orientalism in 1979 initiated an attitude of disdain and even suspicion vis-à-vis oriental philology, a polemic which was continued vehemently by others under the banner of “postcolonial studies”. What finally came to rescue textual scholarship was an unexpected political development: the urgency to rethink the Middle East after the shock of 9/11. A vast number of centers were

3 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1999-Arabica
TL;DR: The terme isrā'liyyat as mentioned in this paper is often mentionne dans les travaux sur le Coran and dans the histoires islamiques sur les prophetes.
Abstract: Le terme isrā'īliyyāt a ete souvent mentionne dans les travaux sur le Coran et dans les histoires islamiques sur les prophetes. Dans l'exegese islamique moderne, isrā'īliyyāt indique des traditions et des elements en rapport avec la cosmogonie, les patriarches et les prophetes, qui sont connus comme etant d'origine juive, donc etrangere a l'Islam. Ce terme est egalement utilise dans les etudes occidentales modernes pour designer des elements relatifs a des sujets bibliques. L'etude porte sur les differentes utilisations du terme isrā'īliyyāt dans la litterature arabe et islamique, tout d'abord dans ses premiers usages, puis par rapport au sens donne au terme dans les travaux de Ibn Taymiyya et Ibn Katīr, et enfin a l'evolution de ce sens apres Ibn Katīr et dans la litterature moderne

63 citations

Book
01 Mar 2004
TL;DR: The authors examines how an elite group of traditionists, historians and theologians shaped Muslims' perceptions of their prophet, their community and their behavior by retelling and interpreting the story of Muhammad's ascent to heaven (the mi'raj).
Abstract: This book examines how an elite group of traditionists, historians and theologians shaped Muslims' perceptions of their prophet, their community and their behavior by retelling and interpreting the story of Muhammad's ascent to heaven (the mi'raj).

24 citations

Book
01 Jan 2007
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the history of the Chubanids Companionship (suhba) from 1100 to 1895, up to the Ottoman period Erbakan, Necmettin Eyup al-Fadl b.
Abstract: 'Abd al-Hafiz b. al-Hasan 'Abd al-Rahim Dihlawi, Shah Abu 'Abdallah Ya'qub b. Da'ud Abu Ya'za Adib Nishapuri 'Adnan Ali Hasjmy Ali Riza Pasa Alus, Sermet Muhtar Andelib, Mehmet Esat, Faik Anthropology of Islam Araz, Nezihe Armenia, Armenians: 1100-1895 'Asabiyya Atfayyash, Muhammad b. Yusuf Ayverdi, Samiha Badakhshi, Nur al-Din Ja'far Baghdad, from 1500 to Iraqi independence Bayramiyye Berkand, Muazzez Tahsin Bilbasar, Kemal al-Butr Cafer Efendi Cem Sadisi Chapar b. Qaidu Charity, modern period Chubanids Companionship (suhba) Dar al-Nadwa Dehhani Edhem Pasa Egypt up to the Ottoman period Erbakan, Necmettin Eyup al-Fadl b. al-Rabi' Fakhkh Faydi, Abu l-Fayd Faysal b. 'Abd al-'Aziz al-Fazari Fehim Suleyman Ghaznavids al-Ghuzuli Golden Horde Hadiyya (Ethiopia) Hamza b. 'Abd al-Muttalib Hidayat, Sadeq Humam al-Din Muhammad b. Afaridun al-Tabrizi Humayd b. Thawr al-Hilali Husayn, Ahmad al-Husayn b. 'Ali b. Abi Talib Ibn Daniyal Ibn Maja Ibn Manzur Imamzade Mehmed Esad Iqritish, the dynasty al-Khasibi, Abu 'Abbas Ahmad Resid Rahmeti Arat Uluboy, Abdulbaki Fevzi Vasi Alisi

20 citations