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Journal ArticleDOI

Notes on Some of Osborn's Mallophaga Types and the Description of a New Genus, Rotundiceps (Philopteridae)

01 Jan 1952-Psyche (Cambridge Entomological Club)-Vol. 59, Iss: 1, pp 26-30

TL;DR: There is a small series of Herbert Osborn's Mallophaga types, comprising nine species, in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, which were described as new in his 1896 paper, Insects Af fect in Domestic animal.

AbstractThere is a small series of Herbert Osborn's Mallophaga types, comprising nine species, in the Museum of Comparative Zoology. These were described as new in his 1896 paper, Insects Af fect in ,g Domestic animal^.^ I should like to express my indebtedness to the late Mr. James E. Peters, Curator of Birds, Museum of Comparative Zoology, who permitted me on numerous occasions to examine bird skins for lice to help determine the validity of host designations, and to Dr. Joseph Bequaert, Curator of Insects, for the loan of the type material. Mr. Louis Lipovsky, Department of Entomology, University of Kansas, supplied me with additional material. Dr. K. C. Emerson has given me many valuable suggestions concerning the material. A grantin-aid from the Society of the Sigma Xi made i t possible for me to complete this study.

Topics: Philopteridae (65%), Mallophaga (54%), Genus (53%)

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01 Jan 2003

94 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The short period of production of microfilariae of species of Eulimdana in charadriiform birds and Pelecitusfulicaeatrae in coots may be related to the fact that transmission is by permanent ectoparasites (lice) constantly exposed to microfiliariae in the skin and the dangers of lice acquiring lethal numbers of microFilariae.
Abstract: Lice transmit species of Eulimdana. Larvae of Eulimdana wongae are described from Austromen- opon limosae and Actornithophilus limosae (Amblycera) and Carduiceps clayae (Ischnocera) collected on a marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa). Larvae of Eulimdana bainae are described from Austromenopon phaeopodis (Amblycera) and Lunaceps numenii phaeopi (Ischnocera) from a whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus). Adults of species of Eulimdana in charadriiform birds and Pelecitusfulicaeatrae in coots produce microfilariae for a short period only and then die and are resorbed (species of Eulimdana), a phenomenon called ephemerality, or become reproductively senescent but remain alive (P. fulicaeatrae). Microfilariae inhabit the skin and presumably survive for a prolonged period. The short period of production of microfilariae may be related to the fact that transmission is by permanent ectoparasites (lice) constantly exposed to microfilariae in the skin and the dangers of lice acquiring lethal numbers of microfilariae. Ephemerality may have evolved in species in which adults occupy sites where, when they die, they are harmlessly resorbed (e.g., species of Eulimdana in the neck). Reproductive senescence may have evolved in species that occupy sites where, if they were to die, they might provoke a life threatening inflammation (e.g., P. fulicaeatrae near joints in the legs).

30 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
04 Jul 2012-Zootaxa
TL;DR: The louse genus Lunaceps Clay and Meinertzhagen, 1939, parasitic on shorebirds (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae) is re-vised and L. limosella limosa Bechet, 1968, which was previously considered a junior synonym of L Limosella Timmermann, 1954, is resurrected as avalid species.
Abstract: The louse genus Lunaceps Clay and Meinertzhagen, 1939, parasitic on shorebirds (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae) is re-vised Six new species and one new subspecies of Lunaceps Clay and Meinertzhagen, 1939 parasitic on shorebirds (Char-adriiformes, Scolopacidae) are described They are L enigmaticus sp nov from Stilt Sandpiper Micropalama himantopus (Bonaparte, 1826), L kukri sp nov from Long-billed Curlew Numenius americanus Bechstein, 1812, L mintoni sp novfrom Great Knot Calidris tenuirostris (Horsfield, 1821), L rothkoi sp nov from Buff-breasted Sandpiper Tryngites sub- ruficollis (Vieillot, 1819), L schismatus sp nov from Dunlin Calidris alpina (Linnaeus, 1758), L superciliosus fromSharp-tailed Sandpiper Calidris acuminata (Horsfield, 1821) and Long-toed Stint Calidris subminuta (Middendorff,1853), and L numenii madagascariensis ssp nov from Far Eastern Curlew Numenius madagascariensis (Linnaeus,1766) Furthermore, the species L cabanisi Timmermann, 1954, and L pusillus are placed as new junior synonyms of L incoenis (Kellogg and Chapman, 1899); the species L haematopi Timmermann, 1954, L oliveri Timmermann, 1954, and L husainii Ansari, 1956, are placed as new junior synonyms of L numenii numenii (Denny, 1842), L numenii phaeopi (Denny, 1842), and L falcinellus Timmermann, 1954, respectively, and the subspecies L holophaeus timmermanni Bechet, 1968, is regarded as a new junior synonym of L falcinellus Timmermann, 1954 Lunaceps limosella limosa Bechet, 1968, which was previously considered a junior synonym of L limosella Timmermann, 1954, is resurrected as avalid species Lunaceps wilsoni Carriker, 1956, is considered a nomen dubium, and L parabolicus Eichler (in Nietham-mer), 1953, is removed to the genus Quadraceps Clay and Meinertzhagen, 1939 as Quadraceps parabolicus comb nov,although its status in Quadraceps needs further attention All species and subspecies of Lunaceps are illustrated and rede-scribed, and a key is provided for their identification Three populations, from which only poor or limited data are available, are placed as incerta sedis

10 citations


Cites background from "Notes on Some of Osborn's Mallophag..."

  • ...…listed 13 species in Lunaceps, but three of them were considered synonymous with other species (L. inaequalis, L. oliveri and L. phaeopodis), and they included Osborn’s Nirmus cordatus Osborn, 1896, placed by Edwards (1952) in Rotundiceps Edwards, 1952, where it remains today (Price et al., 2003)....

    [...]

  • ...GUSTAFSSON & OLSSON62 · Zootaxa 3377 © 2012 Magnolia Press Discussion: Without a dorsal preantennal suture, and with a similar shape of the head and abdomen, L. paschalis is morphologically close to Rotundiceps cordatus (Osborn, 1896), originally described from the same host (Edwards, 1952)....

    [...]

  • ...Edwards (1952) stated that he could find no R. cordatus on the type host, Limosa haemastica, but plenty on L. fedoa, and apparently transferred the type host status to this species in his description of Rotundiceps....

    [...]

  • ...Edwards (1952) erected the monotypic genus Rotundiceps for N. cordatus, but Timmermann (1972: 104) regarded Rotundiceps as a subgenus of Lunaceps....

    [...]

  • ...phaeopodis), and they included Osborn’s Nirmus cordatus Osborn, 1896, placed by Edwards (1952) in Rotundiceps Edwards, 1952, where it remains today (Price et al....

    [...]


Journal Article
TL;DR: Six species of Picicola from the Passeriformes but excluding the family Pittidae are discussed and a key is provided and one new species is described from Basileuterus coronatus regulus.
Abstract: Six species of Picicola from the Passeriformes but excluding the family Pittidae are discussed and a key is provided. One new species is described from Basileuterus coronatus regulus; P. rubina is synonymized and the lectotype for P. bimaculatus is designated. iformes.) Hopkins and Clay (1952) recognized seven species of Picicola from the Piciformes and six from the Passeriformes. In 1958 Clay discussed the po sition of Picicola within the Degeeriella complex. Since that time, Dalgleish (1969) has revised the species from the Picidae and formed three species groups, and Somadder and Tandan (1977) have dealt with nine species from the Pittidae. This paper deals with six Picicola species from 14 other Passeriform families. These Picicola differ from the species groups discussed by Dal gleish and Sommader and Tandan in that the sides of the marginal carina of the head are nearly broken where the carina curves around the frons and are on this account assigned to the foedus group. I have tried to parallel Dalgleish's use of diagnostic features where pos sible in the hope that two complementary keys would result. Peters (1948) and Gruson (1976) were used for the nomenclature of hosts. The dimensions provided for each species of Piciola were taken from all of the specimens listed in the "Material Examined" sections. All of the members of the foedus group have a carina which is nearly divided (here called the lateral notch) at the point where the sides curve around the frons, and a varying number of setae and their associated "ca nals" in the portion of the carina anterior to the lateral notch. All of the specimens show a preantennal suture at the posterior edge of the frontal plate, however, in some specimens it is difficult to see.

7 citations