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Proceedings ArticleDOI

On improving the pooling in HDR-VDP-2 towards better HDR perceptual quality assessment

25 Feb 2014-electronic imaging (International Society for Optics and Photonics)-Vol. 9014, pp 143-151

TL;DR: The HDR Visual Difference Predictor (HDR-VDP-2) is primarily a visibility prediction metric i.e. whether the signal distortion is visible to the eye and to what extent and it also employs a pooling function to compute an overall quality score.

AbstractHigh Dynamic Range (HDR) signals capture much higher contrasts as compared to the traditional 8-bit low dynamic range (LDR) signals. This is achieved by representing the visual signal via values that are related to the real-world luminance, instead of gamma encoded pixel values which is the case with LDR. Therefore, HDR signals cover a larger luminance range and tend to have more visual appeal. However, due to the higher luminance conditions, the existing methods cannot be directly employed for objective quality assessment of HDR signals. For that reason, the HDR Visual Difference Predictor (HDR-VDP-2) has been proposed. HDR-VDP-2 is primarily a visibility prediction metric i.e. whether the signal distortion is visible to the eye and to what extent. Nevertheless, it also employs a pooling function to compute an overall quality score. This paper focuses on the pooling aspect in HDR-VDP-2 and employs a comprehensive database of HDR images (with their corresponding subjective ratings) to improve the prediction accuracy of HDR-VDP-2. We also discuss and evaluate the existing objective methods and provide a perspective towards better HDR quality assessment.

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI

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TL;DR: An objective HDR video quality measure (HDR-VQM) based on signal pre-processing, transformation, and subsequent frequency based decomposition is presented, which is one of the first objective method for high dynamic range video quality estimation.
Abstract: High dynamic range (HDR) signals fundamentally differ from the traditional low dynamic range (LDR) ones in that pixels are related (proportional) to the physical luminance in the scene (i.e. scene-referred). For that reason, the existing LDR video quality measurement methods may not be directly used for assessing quality in HDR videos. To address that, we present an objective HDR video quality measure (HDR-VQM) based on signal pre-processing, transformation, and subsequent frequency based decomposition. Video quality is then computed based on a spatio-temporal analysis that relates to human eye fixation behavior during video viewing. Consequently, the proposed method does not involve expensive computations related to explicit motion analysis in the HDR video signal, and is therefore computationally tractable. We also verified its prediction performance on a comprehensive, in-house subjective HDR video database with 90 sequences, and it was found to be better than some of the existing methods in terms of correlation with subjective scores (for both across sequence and per sequence cases). A software implementation of the proposed scheme is also made publicly available for free download and use. HighlightsThe paper presents one of the first objective method for high dynamic range video quality estimation.It is based on analysis of short term video segments taking into account human viewing behavior.The method described in the paper would be useful in scenarios where HDR video quality needs to be determined in an HDR video chain study.

100 citations


Cites background from "On improving the pooling in HDR-VDP..."

  • ...The issue assumes further significance given that most of the existing objective methods may not be directly applicable for HDR quality estimation [6], [7] and [8] (note that these studies only deal with HDR images and not video)....

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Proceedings ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The performance of HDR-VDP is compared to that of PSNR and SSIM computed on perceptually encoded luminance values, when considering compressed HDR images, to show that these simpler metrics can be effectively employed to assess image fidelity for applications such as HDR image compression.
Abstract: Due to the much larger luminance and contrast characteristics of high dynamic range (HDR) images, well-known objective quality metrics, widely used for the assessment of low dynamic range (LDR) content, cannot be directly applied to HDR images in order to predict their perceptual fidelity. To overcome this limitation, advanced fidelity metrics, such as the HDR-VDP, have been proposed to accurately predict visually significant differences. However, their complex calibration may make them difficult to use in practice. A simpler approach consists in computing arithmetic or structural fidelity metrics, such as PSNR and SSIM, on perceptually encoded luminance values but the performance of quality prediction in this case has not been clearly studied. In this paper, we aim at providing a better comprehension of the limits and the potentialities of this approach, by means of a subjective study. We compare the performance of HDR-VDP to that of PSNR and SSIM computed on perceptually encoded luminance values, when considering compressed HDR images. Our results show that these simpler metrics can be effectively employed to assess image fidelity for applications such as HDR image compression.

46 citations


Cites methods from "On improving the pooling in HDR-VDP..."

  • ...Recently, Narwaria et al.19 computed optimized pooling weights for HDR-VDP over a dataset of HDR compressed images....

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  • ...Recently, Narwaria et al.(19) computed optimized pooling weights for HDR-VDP over a dataset of HDR compressed images....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This report presents the key research and models that exploit the limitations of perception to tackle visual quality and workload alike, and presents the open problems and promising future research targeting the question of how to minimize the effort to compute and display only the necessary pixels while still offering a user full visual experience.
Abstract: Advances in computer graphics enable us to create digital images of astonishing complexity and realism. However, processing resources are still a limiting factor. Hence, many costly but desirable aspects of realism are often not accounted for, including global illumination, accurate depth of field and motion blur, spectral effects, etc. especially in real-time rendering. At the same time, there is a strong trend towards more pixels per display due to larger displays, higher pixel densities or larger fields of view. Further observable trends in current display technology include more bits per pixel high dynamic range, wider color gamut/fidelity, increasing refresh rates better motion depiction, and an increasing number of displayed views per pixel stereo, multi-view, all the way to holographic or lightfield displays. These developments cause significant unsolved technical challenges due to aspects such as limited compute power and bandwidth. Fortunately, the human visual system has certain limitations, which mean that providing the highest possible visual quality is not always necessary. In this report, we present the key research and models that exploit the limitations of perception to tackle visual quality and workload alike. Moreover, we present the open problems and promising future research targeting the question of how we can minimize the effort to compute and display only the necessary pixels while still offering a user full visual experience.

43 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Jie Li1, Jia Yan1, Dexiang Deng1, Wenxuan Shi1, Songfeng Deng 
TL;DR: A computational algorithm based on hybrid model to automatically extract vision perception features from raw image patches is proposed, which demonstrates very competitive quality prediction performance of the proposed method.
Abstract: The aim of research on the no-reference image quality assessment problem is to design models that can predict the quality of distorted images consistently with human visual perception. Due to the little prior knowledge of the images, it is still a difficult problem. This paper proposes a computational algorithm based on hybrid model to automatically extract vision perception features from raw image patches. Convolutional neural network (CNN) and support vector regression (SVR) are combined for this purpose. In the hybrid model, the CNN is trained as an efficient feature extractor, and the SVR performs as the regression operator. Extensive experiments demonstrate very competitive quality prediction performance of the proposed method.

23 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The crowdsourcing evaluations show that some TMOs are more suitable for evaluation of HDR image compression, compared to a reference ground truth obtained via a subjective assessment of the same HDR images on a Dolby `Pulsar' HDR monitor in a laboratory environment.
Abstract: Crowdsourcing is becoming a popular cost effective alternative to lab-based evaluations for subjective quality assessment. However, crowd-based evaluations are constrained by the limited availability of display devices used by typical online workers, which makes the evaluation of high dynamic range (HDR) content a challenging task. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using low dynamic range versions of original HDR content obtained with tone mapping operators (TMOs) in crowdsourcing evaluations. We conducted two crowdsourcing experiments by employing workers from Microworkers platform. In the first experiment, we evaluate five HDR images encoded at different bit rates with the upcoming JPEG XT coding standard. To find best suitable TMO, we create eleven tone-mapped versions of these five HDR images by using eleven different TMOs. The crowdsourcing results are compared to a reference ground truth obtained via a subjective assessment of the same HDR images on a Dolby `Pulsar' HDR monitor in a laboratory environment. The second crowdsourcing evaluation uses semantic differentiators to better understand the characteristics of eleven different TMOs. The crowdsourcing evaluations show that some TMOs are more suitable for evaluation of HDR image compression.

8 citations


References
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Journal ArticleDOI
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Book
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