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Journal ArticleDOI

On the design and evaluation of open volumetric air receiver for process heat applications

TL;DR: In this article, an open volumetric air receiver for metal processing was designed and evaluated using the ANSYS-FLUENT computational fluid dynamics tool for uniform and non-uniform heating of porous absorbers.
About: This article is published in Solar Energy.The article was published on 2015-11-01. It has received 20 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Heat transfer & Thermal energy storage.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the Open Volumetric Air Receiver (OVAR) is used for heat treatment of steels and other possible extractive metallurgy operations such as the smelting of metals from its ores.

26 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a detailed insight to the wake region behind an inclined flat-plate or heliostat is provided based on analysis and experiment, and the use of a cyclone separator with defined parameters based on a decision variable has been suggested for reliable operation of an OVAR.

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a scale-down retrofitted furnace is designed and analyzed, and the importance of different process stages like, solar thermal energy absorption, storage and utilization in design of such a system is presented.

13 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a cyclone separator for cleaning and collection strategy of dust from an open volumetric air receiver is described, where the atmospheric air is used as heat transfer fluid with suction.

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
29 Dec 2019
TL;DR: In this article, the efficiency of a solar cooker with parabolic concentrating collector integrated with thermal storage using 1D finite difference computational model was investigated for charging and discharging (cooking), under Addis Ababa climatic condition for days, with highest and lowest solar irradiance and thermal storage efficiency of 66.7, 31.1% and 22% respectively.
Abstract: Cooking using biomass, which is commonly practiced in developing countries, causes rampant deforestation and exposure to emission. Hence, utilization of solar energy for cooking is a green solution. As solar radiation is not available at every hour of the day, thermal storage is essential for availing thermal energy at required time of use. Therefore, this work investigates the efficiency of solar cooker with parabolic concentrating collector integrated with thermal storage using 1D finite difference computational model. A cook stove on packed pebble bed thermal storage having 0.3 m diameter and 0.9 m height and a storage capacity of 40.1 MJ of energy during a clear day and 12.85 MJ energy was simulated for charging and discharging (cooking), under Addis Ababa climatic condition for days, with highest and lowest solar irradiance and thermal storage efficiency of 66.7%, cooker thermal efficiency of 45% during discharging of heat by forced convection, and 41% during discharging of heat by conduction, were obtained for the day with the highest solar irradiance. The overall efficiency of the cook stove with thermal storage was 30% and 22% for discharging by forced convection and conduction, respectively. For the day with lowest beam solar irradiance, the storage, thermal and overall efficiencies were 70.9%, 31.1% and 22.0%, respectively. Hence, it can be concluded that solar concentrating cookers with thermal storage can have an overall cooking efficiency between 22% and 30% on a clear sky day when the Sun is overhead in tropical areas.

11 citations


Cites background from "On the design and evaluation of ope..."

  • ...In addition, Sharma and Sarma [12] conducted research on design and evaluation of open volumetric air receiver....

    [...]

  • ...[12] P. Sharma and R. Sarma, “On the design and evaluation of open volumetric air receiver for process heat applications,” Energy Procedia, vol. 57, pp. 2994–3003, 2014....

    [...]

References
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01 Jan 1952

6,655 citations

MonographDOI
25 Jul 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a classification of Heat Exchanger design according to the number of fluids and their properties, such as surface heat transfer, flow arrangement, and number of transfer units.
Abstract: Preface. Nomenclature. 1 Classification of Heat Exchangers. 1.1 Introduction. 1.2 Classification According to Transfer Processes. 1.3 Classification According to Number of Fluids. 1.4 Classification According to Surface Compactness. 1.5 Classification According to Construction Features. 1.6 Classification According to Flow Arrangements. 1.7 Classification According to Heat Transfer Mechanisms. Summary. References. Review Questions. 2 Overview of Heat Exchanger Design Methodology. 2.1 Heat Exchanger Design Methodology. 2.2 Interactions Among Design Considerations. Summary. References. Review Questions. Problems. 3 Basic Thermal Design Theory for Recuperators. 3.1 Formal Analogy between Thermal and Electrical Entities. 3.2 Heat Exchanger Variables and Thermal Circuit. 3.3 The ?(Epsilon)-NTU Method. 3.4 Effectiveness - Number of Transfer Unit Relationships. 3.5 The P-NTU Method. 3.6 P-N TU R elat ionships. 3.7 The Mean Temperature Difference Method. 3.8 F Factors for Various Flow Arrangements. 3.9 Comparison of the ?(Epsilon)-NTU, P-NTU, and MTD Methods. 3.10 The ?(Psi)-P and P1-P2 Methods. 3.11 Solution Methods for Determining Exchanger Effectiveness. 3.12 Heat Exchanger Design Problems. Summary. References. Review Questions. Problems. 4 Additional Considerations for Thermal Design of Recuperators. 4.1 Longitudinal Wall Heat Conduction Effects. 4.2 Nonuniform Overall Heat Transfer Coefficients. 4.3 Additional Considerations for Extended Surface Exchangers. 4.4 Additional Considerations for Shell-and-Tube Exchangers. Summary. References. Review Questions. Problems. 5 Thermal Design Theory for Regenerators. 5.1 Heat Transfer Analysis. 5.2 The ?(Epsilon)-NTUo Method. 5.3 The ?(Lambda)-?(Pi) Method. 5.4 Influence of Longitudinal Wall Heat Conduction. 5.5 Influence of Transverse Wall Heat Conduction. 5.6 Influence of Pressure and Carryover Leakages. 5.7 Influence of Matrix Material, Size, and Arrangement. Summary. References. Review Questions. Problems. 6 Heat Exchanger Pressure Drop Analysis. 6.1 Introduction. 6.2 Extended Surface Heat Exchanger Pressure Drop. 6.3 Regenerator Pressure Drop. 6.4 Tubular Heat Exchanger Pressure Drop. 6.5 Plate Heat Exchanger Pressure Drop. 6.6 Pressure Drop Associated with Fluid Distribution Elements. 6.7 Pressure Drop Presentation. 6.8 Pressure Drop Dependence on Geometry and Fluid Properties. Summary. References. Review Questions. Problems. 7 Surface Basic Heat Transfer and Flow Friction Characteristics. 7.1 Basic Concepts. 7.2 Dimensionless Groups. 7.3 Experimental Techniques for Determining Surface Characteristics. 7.4 Analytical and Semiempirical Heat Transfer and Friction Factor Correlations for Simple Geometries. 7.5 Experimental Heat Transfer and Friction Factor Correlations for Complex Geometries. 7.6 Influence of Temperature-Dependent Fluid Properties. 7.7 Influence of Superimposed Free Convection. 7.8 Influence of Superimposed Radiation. Summary. References. Review Questions. Problems. 8 Heat Exchanger Surface Geometrical Characteristics. 8.1 Tubular Heat Exchangers. 8.2 Tube-Fin Heat Exchangers. 8.3 Plate-Fin Heat Exchangers. 8.4 Regenerators with Continuous Cylindrical Passages. 8.5 Shell-and-Tube Exchangers with Segmental Baffles. 8.6 Gasketed Plate Heat Exchangers. Summary. References. Review Questions. 9 Heat Exchanger Design Procedures. 9.1 Fluid Mean Temperatures. 9.2 Plate-Fin Heat Exchangers. 9.3 Tube-Fin Heat Exchangers. 9.3.4 Core Mass Velocity Equation. 9.4 Plate Heat Exchangers. 9.5 Shell-and-Tube Heat Exchangers. 9.6 Heat Exchanger Optimization. Summary. References. Review Questions. Problems. 10 Selection of Heat Exchangers and Their Components. 10.1 Selection Criteria Based on Operating Parameters. 10.2 General Selection Guidelines for Major Exchanger Types. 10.3 Some Quantitative Considerations. Summary. References. Review Questions. Problems. 11 Thermodynamic Modeling and Analysis. 11.1 Introduction. 11.2 Modeling a Heat Exchanger Based on the First Law of Thermodynamics. 11.3 Irreversibilities in Heat Exchangers. 11.4 Thermodynamic Irreversibility and Temperature Cross Phenomena. 11.5 A Heuristic Approach to an Assessment of Heat Exchanger Effectiveness. 11.6 Energy, Exergy, and Cost Balances in the Analysis and Optimization of Heat Exchangers. 11.7 Performance Evaluation Criteria Based on the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Summary. References. Review Questions. Problems. 12 Flow Maldistribution and Header Design. 12.1 Geometry-Induced Flow Maldistribution. 12.2 Operating Condition-Induced Flow Maldistribution. 12.3 Mitigation of Flow Maldistribution. 12.4 Header and Manifold Design. Summary. References. Review Questions. Problems. 13 Fouling and Corrosion. 13.1 Fouling and its Effect on Exchanger Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop. 13.2 Phenomenological Considerations of Fouling. 13.3 Fouling Resistance Design Approach. 13.4 Prevention and Mitigation of Fouling. 13.5 Corrosion in Heat Exchangers. Summary. References. Review Questions. Problems. Appendix A: Thermophysical Properties. Appendix B: ?(Epsilon)-NTU Relationships for Liquid-Coupled Exchangers. Appendix C: Two-Phase Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop Correlations. C.1 Two-Phase Pressure Drop Correlations. C.2 Heat Transfer Correlations for Condensation. C.3 Heat Transfer Correlations for Boiling. Appendix D: U and CUA Values for Various Heat Exchangers. General References on or Related to Heat Exchangers. Index.

2,006 citations

Book
01 Jan 1992
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the low-temperature properties of liquid and solid matter, including liquid helium, and the physics on which they rely, the definition of temperature, thermometry, and a variety of design and construction techniques.
Abstract: This textbook contains a wealth of information essential for successful experiments at low temperatures. The first chapters describe the low-temperature properties of liquid and solid matter, including liquid helium. The major part of the book is devoted to refrigeration techniques and the physics on which they rely, the definition of temperature, thermometry, and a variety of design and construction techniques. The lively style and practical basis of this text make it easy to read and particularly useful to anyone beginning research in low-temperature physics. Low-temperature scientisits will find it of great value due to its extensive compilation of materials data and relevant new results from thermometry and materials properties as well as many additional references. This edition also includes "problems".

590 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A chronological review of the volumetric receivers of most interest for electricity production, identifying their different configurations, materials and real and expected results, and pointing out their main advantages and conclusions based on the multitude of international and national projects reports and references.

523 citations