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Book ChapterDOI

One Concept, Many Names! Analyzing a Serious Challenge Lying Ahead of the Formation of Academic Persian Vocabulary

01 Jan 2021-pp 65-79
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors reviewed and compared at least twenty books and dictionaries in the fields of linguistics and literature written, developed or translated by Iranian researchers, and found that such texts were faced with glaring inconsistency in selection and use of Persian equivalents for the related academic concepts.
Abstract: Academic language or language for academic purposes in its both forms, namely language for general academic purposes and language for specific academic purposes, addresses various common language skills among which the importance of academic vocabulary or terminology is now widely accepted. The occurrence of such vocabulary, created and used to communicate ideas about their specialized worlds, is a common and important feature of academic or specialized texts in any subject field. Despite such importance, reviewing the status of vocabulary in Academic Persian or Persian for Academic Purposes (PAP), as a newly-grown discipline, reveals that this area suffers from a serious challenge namely lack of consistency in academic vocabulary selection and use. Undoubtedly, the use of various designations or equivalents for an imported concept is clear evidence to the claim. Thus, in this research, at first the significant position of academic vocabulary in academic language in general and academic Persian in specific as well as the Academy of Persian Language and Literature (APLL)’s activities especially in word selection and terminology, as its central concern, are introduced. Then, through providing notable examples taken from the disciplines of linguistics and literature, the problem of using various designations for one concept and its consequences in Academic Persian language are dealt with. In doing so, through reviewing and comparing at least twenty books and dictionaries in the fields of linguistics and literature written, developed or translated by Iranian researchers, it was found that such texts were faced with glaring inconsistency in selection and use of Persian equivalents for the related academic concepts. To approve this claim, thirty terms, chosen randomly from the above-mentioned texts, are provided as a sample and then analyzed. Reviewing the haphazard use of these terms in such texts revealed that even the equivalents proposed by the APLL, as the legitimate authority of word selection for the Academic Persian, could not have terminated this inconsistency which has turned into a source of misunderstanding among specialists and users.
References
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Book
01 Jan 1986
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a survey of the sociolinguistics and the Sociology of Language Methodological Concerns in the context of Pidgin to Creole and beyond.
Abstract: Preface. Acknowledgements. 1. Introduction Knowledge of Language Variation Language and Society Sociolinguistics and the Sociology of Language Methodological Concerns Overview Further Reading Part I: Languages and Communities: 2. Languages, Dialects, and Varieties Language or Dialect? Standardization Regional Dialects Social Dialects Styles, Registers, and Beliefs Further Reading 3. Pidgins and Creoles Lingua Francas Definitions Distribution and Characteristics Origins From Pidgin to Creole and Beyond Further Reading 4. Codes Diglossia Bilingualism and Multilingualism Code-Switching Accommodation Further Reading 5. Speech Communities Definitions Intersecting Communities Networks and Repertoires Further Reading Part II: Inherent Variety: 6. Language Variation Regional Variation The Linguistic Variable Social Variation Data Collection and Analysis Further Reading 7. Some Findings and Issues An Early Study New York City Norwich and Reading A Variety of Studies Belfast Controversies Further Reading 8. Change The Traditional View Some Changes in Progress The Process of Change Further Reading Part III: Words at Work: 9. Words and Culture Whorf Kinship Taxonomies Color Prototypes Taboo and Euphemism Further Reading 10. Ethnographies Varieties of Talk The Ethnography of Speaking Ethnomethodology Further Reading 11. Solidarity and Politeness Tu and Vous Address Terms Politeness Further Reading 12. Talk and Action Speech Acts Cooperation Conversation Further Reading Part IV: Understanding and Intervening: 13. Gender Differences Possible Explanations Further Reading 14. Disadvantage Codes Again African American English Consequences for Education Further Reading 15. Planning Issues A Variety of Situations Further Examples Winners and Losers Further Reading 16. Conclusion References Index

2,182 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 1988-Language

1,617 citations

Book
17 Aug 2006
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a set of themes to explore: Conceptions and Controversies Unit 1: Specific or General Academic Purposes? Unit 2: Study Skills or Academic Literacy? Unit 3: Lingua Franca or Tyrannosaurus Rex? Unit 4: Pragmatism or Critique? Theme 2: Literacies and practices Unit 5: Discourses, Communities and Cultures Unit 6: Genre Analysis and Academic Texts Unit 7: Corpus Analysis and academic texts Unit 8: Ethnographically-Oriented Analysis and EAP Theme 3
Abstract: Introduction Part A: Introduction Theme 1: Conceptions and Controversies Unit 1: Specific or General Academic Purposes? Unit 2: Study Skills or Academic Literacy? Unit 3: Lingua Franca or Tyrannosaurus Rex? Unit 4: Pragmatism or Critique? Theme 2: Literacies and Practices Unit 5: Discourses, Communities and Cultures Unit 6: Genre Analysis and Academic Texts Unit 7: Corpus Analysis and Academic Texts Unit 8: Ethnographically-Oriented Analysis and EAP Theme 3: Design and Delivery Unit 9: Needs and Rights Unit 10: Development and Implementation Unit 11: Methodologies and Materials Unit 12: Feedback and Assessment Part B: Extension Theme 1: Conceptions and Controversies Unit 1: Specific or General Academic Purposes? Unit 2: Study Skills or Academic Literacy? Unit 3: Lingua Franca or Tyrannosaurus Rex? Unit 4: Pragmatism or Critique? Theme 2: Literacies and Practices Unit 5: Discourses, Communities and Cultures Unit 6: Genre Analysis and Academic Texts Unit 7: Corpus Analysis and Academic Texts Unit 8: Ethnographically-Oriented Analysis and EAP Theme 3: Design and Delivery Unit 9: Needs and Rights Unit 10: Development and Implementation Unit 11: Methodologies and Materials Unit 12: Feedback and Assessment Part C: Exploration Theme 1: Conceptions and Controversies Unit 1: Specific or General Academic Purposes? Unit 2: Study Skills or Academic Literacy? Unit 3: Lingua Franca or Tyrannosaurus rex? Unit 4: Pragmatism or Critique? Theme 2: Literacies and Practices Unit 5: Discourses, Communities and Cultures Unit 6: Genre Analysis and Academic Texts Unit 7: Corpus Analysis and Academic Texts Unit 8: Ethnographically-Oriented Analysis and EAP Theme 3: Design and Delivery Unit 9: Needs and Rights Unit 10: Development and Implementation Unit 11: Methodologies and Materials Unit 12: Feedback and Assessment. Glossary. References

639 citations

Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: This unique course has been developed on the basis of years of teaching experience and research at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) and is particularly suitable for translation courses, freelance translators, technical writers, as well as for non-linguists who are confronted with terminology processing as part of their profession.
Abstract: Since the advent of the computer, terminology management can be carried out by almost anyone who has learnt to use a computer. Terminology management has proved to be an efficient tool in international communications in industry, education and international organisations. Software packages are readily available and international corporations often have their own terminology database. Following these developments, translators and terminologists are confronted with a specialised form of information management involving compilation and standardisation of vocabulary, storage, retrieval and updating. A Practical Course in Terminology Processing provides the key to methods of terminology management for the English language, for general and specific purposes. This unique course has been developed on the basis of years of teaching experience and research at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST, UK) and is particularly suitable for translation courses, freelance translators, technical writers, as well as for non-linguists who are confronted with terminology processing as part of their profession. The 1996 reprint of the paperback edition includes an index.

629 citations

Book
01 Jan 1998
TL;DR: English for academic purposes, English for business purposes, and language issues in esp are explained.
Abstract: 1. Introduction 2. A historical perspective 3. English for academic purposes 4. English for business purposes 5. Language issues in esp 6. The skills in EAP and EOP 7. Needs analysis and evaluation 8. Course design 9. Materials for ESP 10. Classroom practice 11. Assessment: continuous assessment and testing.

542 citations