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Journal Article

One Epos and Some Ruckus : In Search of Lost Sources of the Shāhnāme

01 Jan 2010-Orientalia Suecana (Department of Linguistics and Philology, Uppsala University)-Vol. 59, pp 193-206
TL;DR: In this article, various theories about Ferdowsi's sources are classified in three groups with reference to their proponents, and then each of these theories is critically and briefly analysed.
Abstract: Mohl, an early editor and translator of the Shāhnāme, began the discussion on Ferdowsi’s sources in the Shāhnāme in 1878. From that time until now, it has been one of main issues of discussion among expertson the Shāhnāme and Iranian culture. One can find various theories on Ferdowsi’s sources in the numerous works and articles which are published ever so often. One of the latest works in this field is Kumiko Yamamoto’s book The Oral Background of Persian Epics: Storytelling and Poetry. In the present article, first, various theories about Ferdowsi’s sources are classified in three groups with reference to their proponents, and then each of these theories is critically and briefly analysed. After a detailed introduction to Kumiko Yamamoto’s work, it is evaluated in view of the different theories proposed for the sources of the Shāhnāme. The present author favours the theory of both oral and written sources in the genesis of the Shāhnāme, and, in light of this, some strengths as well as weaknesses of this work are discussed in this extended review.

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Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Yamamoto and Yamamoto discuss how oral tradition inter-connects with Middle Eastern literature and present a Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures (BSIL).
Abstract: KUMIKO YAMAMOTO Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures, 26. Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2003. xxiv + 191 pp. ISBN 90 04 12587 6 The central argument of this book concerns how oral tradition intera...

16 citations

01 Jan 2014
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the image of the ancient Iranian prophet Zoroaster in the Shāhnāme based on a closed reading of the story about the Kaynian king Goshtāsp written by Daqiqi (and continued by Ferdowsi).
Abstract: This paper aims to examine the image of the ancient Iranian prophet Zoroaster in the Shāhnāme based on a closed reading of the story about the Kayānian king Goshtāsp written by Daqiqi (and continued by Ferdowsi). For this purpose it will discuss the thematic properties of the Dāstān-e Goshtāsp (Tale of Goshtāsp) in the light of Iranian historical and epic traditions. Given the religious subject matter of the advent of Zoroaster, my aim is also to explore whether Daqiqi’s account primarily has a religious orientation or is the manifestation of a more secular orientation which represents the taste of kings and nobles with an emphasis on heroic events. The question of the Zoroastrian orientation of Daqiqi’s narrative is especially interesting given that the Shāhnāme was commissioned by an Iranian Muslim monarch and primarily addressed an audience of Persian-speaking Muslims albeit conscious of their national heritage. Of specific interest in my presentation is Daqiqi’s handling of the Sistānian heroic tradition and its hostility to Zoroaster’s patron, and whether there are any important ideological differences between Daqiqi and Ferdowsi in this respect.

14 citations


Cites background from "One Epos and Some Ruckus : In Searc..."

  • ...Hassanabadi, Mahmoud....

    [...]

  • ...Mahmoud Hassanabadi focuses on the character of Rostam in the Shāhnāme....

    [...]

  • ...…the Buyids (934–1055), which claimed semi-independence from the Caliphate and officially revived the cultural 1 The indirect influence of oral transmission on the genesis and evolution of the Persian written epic tradition has been discussed by Kumiko Yamamoto (2003) and Mahmoud Hassanabadi (2010)....

    [...]

  • ...This new IranianIslamic synthesis was effectively generated by Persian regional dynasties, such as the Samanids (819–955) and the Buyids (934–1055), which claimed semi-independence from the Caliphate and officially revived the cultural 1 The indirect influence of oral transmission on the genesis and evolution of the Persian written epic tradition has been discussed by Kumiko Yamamoto (2003) and Mahmoud Hassanabadi (2010)....

    [...]

  • ...Costa Mesa and New York, 1987–2008 (KM) 66 International Shāhnāme Conference… ــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــــ Rostam: A Complex Puzzle: A New Approach to the Identification of the Character of Rostam in the Iranian National Epos Shāhnāme Mahmoud Hassanabadi, University of Sistan and Baluchestan ABSTRACT: There are extensive discussions about the Iranian national epical characters, particularly Rostam, among researchers and scholars in this field....

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References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, it was pointed out that Ferdowsi's claim to have had access to such a history is conventional in character and is paralleled in other chronicles, and the article discusses the older-preface to the Shâhnâmeh and al-Tha'âlebi's history in the light of this claim.
Abstract: The article questions the usual view that Ferdowsi's main source for the Shâhnâmeh was a written prose history of pre-islamic Iran commissioned by Abu Mansur Abd al-Razzâq. It is pointed out that Ferdowsi's claim to have had access to such a history is conventional in character and is paralleled in other chronicles. The article discusses the so-called older-preface to the Shâhnâmeh and al-Tha'âlebi's history in the light of this claim. It concludes by pointing out that the rhetoric of the Shâhnâmeh fits Parry's and Lord's descriptions of oral verse rhetoric and suggests that, for the legendary part of the poem (up to the advent of the Sasanians), Ferdowsi in all probability used versified oral rather than written prose, sources, or if he used written sources these were in verse and derived from an oral tradition. It is accepted that for the Sasanian portion of the poem written prose sources were probably used

25 citations


"One Epos and Some Ruckus : In Searc..." refers background in this paper

  • ...…(2010) has frequently used books which generally advocate oral sources of the Shāhnāme and confirm her theory such as the works of Mahjub (1383), Davis (1992; 1996), and Davidson (1994; 2000), while ignoring some useful works, such as Khāleqi Mo laq’s important and critical studies (1372; 1377;…...

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Yamamoto and Yamamoto discuss how oral tradition inter-connects with Middle Eastern literature and present a Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures (BSIL).
Abstract: KUMIKO YAMAMOTO Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures, 26. Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2003. xxiv + 191 pp. ISBN 90 04 12587 6 The central argument of this book concerns how oral tradition intera...

16 citations

Book
01 Jun 2003
TL;DR: In this paper, a set of formal and thematic criteria is proposed to determine the extent to which written Persian epics show structures ultimately deriving from oral performance, and applied to the Shah-name of Ferdowsi (c. 1000) and to the Garshasp-name (Garshaspname) of Asadi (c., 1064-66).
Abstract: This volume discusses the indirect influence of oral transmission on the genesis and evolution of the Persian written epic tradition. On the basis of formal characteristics of naqqali (Persian storytelling) performance, a set of formal and thematic criteria is proposed to determine the extent to which written Persian epics show structures ultimately deriving from oral performance. It is applied to the Shah-name of Ferdowsi (c. 1000) and to the Garshasp-name of Asadi (c. 1064-66). The first part of the book examines the Oral-Formulaic Theory and proposes an alternative approach focusing on naqqali. The book may be relevant to both oralists and Iranists; it demonstrates the complex process where orality interacts with written tradition in the genesis of the Shah-name.

15 citations