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Journal ArticleDOI

Optimal Randomized Parallel Algorithms for Computational Geometry I

H J Reif1, Sandeep Sen1
01 Jan 1988-Algorithmica (Duke University)-Vol. 7, Iss: 1, pp 91-117

AbstractWe present parallel algorithms for some fundamental problems in computational geometry which have running time of $O(logn)$ using $n$ processors, with very high probability (approaching 1 as $n~ \rightarrow~ \infty$). These include planar point location, triangulation and trapezoidal decomposition. We also present optimal algorithms for 3-D maxima and two-set dominance counting by an application of integer sorting. Most of these algorithms run on CREW PRAM model and have optimal processor-time product which improve on the previously best known algorithms of Atallah and Goodrich [3] for these problems. The crux of these algorithms is a useful data structure which emulates the plane sweeping paradigm used for sequential algorithms. We extend some of the techniques used by Reischuk [22] Reif and Valiant [21] for flashsort algorithm to perform divide and conquer in a plane very efficiently leading to the improved performance by our approach.

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Citations
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
Kenneth L. Clarkson1
06 Jan 1988
TL;DR: Asymptotically tight bounds for a combinatorial quantity of interest in discrete and computational geometry, related to halfspace partitions of point sets, are given.
Abstract: Random sampling is used for several new geometric algorithms. The algorithms are “Las Vegas,” and their expected bounds are with respect to the random behavior of the algorithms. One algorithm reports all the intersecting pairs of a set of line segments in the plane, and requires O(A + n log n) expected time, where A is the size of the answer, the number of intersecting pairs reported. The algorithm requires O(n) space in the worst case. Another algorithm computes the convex hull of a point set in E3 in O(n log A) expected time, where n is the number of points and A is the number of points on the surface of the hull. A simple Las Vegas algorithm triangulates simple polygons in O(n log log n) expected time. Algorithms for half-space range reporting are also given. In addition, this paper gives asymptotically tight bounds for a combinatorial quantity of interest in discrete and computational geometry, related to halfspace partitions of point sets.

1,138 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper describes an effective procedure for stratifying a real semi-algebraic set into cells of constant description size that compares favorably with the doubly exponential size of Collins' decomposition.
Abstract: This paper describes an effective procedure for stratifying a real semi-algebraic set into cells of constant description size. The attractive feature of our method is that the number of cells produced is singly exponential in the number of input variables. This compares favorably with the doubly exponential size of Collins' decomposition. Unlike Collins' construction, however, our scheme does not produce a cell complex but only a smooth stratification. Nevertheless, we are able to apply our results in interesting ways to problems of point location and geometric optimization.

175 citations

Book
09 Sep 2015
Abstract: We present techniques for parallel divide-and-conquer, resulting in improved parallel algorithms for a number of problems. The problems for which we give improved algorithms include intersection detection, trapezoidal decomposition (hence, polygon triangulation), and planar point location (hence, Voronoi diagram construction). We also give efficient parallel algorithms for fractional cascading, 3-dimensional maxima, 2-set dominance counting, and visibility from a point. All of our algorithms run in O(log n) time with either a linear or sub-linear number of processors in the CREW PRAM model.

162 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
24 Oct 1988
TL;DR: It is shown how to compute, in polynomial time, a simplicial packing of size O(r/sup d/) that covers d-space, each of whose simplices intersects O(n/r) hyperplanes.
Abstract: A number of efficient probabilistic algorithms based on the combination of divide-and-conquer and random sampling have been recently discovered. It is shown that all those algorithms can be derandomized with only polynomial overhead. In the process. results of independent interest concerning the covering of hypergraphs are established, and various probabilistic bounds in geometry complexity are improved. For example, given n hyperplanes in d-space and any large enough integer r, it is shown how to compute, in polynomial time, a simplicial packing of size O(r/sup d/) that covers d-space, each of whose simplices intersects O(n/r) hyperplanes. It is also shown how to locate a point among n hyperplanes in d-space in O(log n) query time, using O(n/sup d/) storage and polynomial preprocessing. >

136 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
30 Oct 1989
TL;DR: The general form of the case for which the method of conditional probabilities can be applied in the parallel context is given and the reason why this form does not lend itself to parallelization is discussed.
Abstract: A method is provided for converting randomized parallel algorithms into deterministic parallel algorithms. The approach is based on a parallel implementation of the method of conditional probabilities. Results obtained by applying the method to the set balancing problem, lattice approximation, edge-coloring graphs, random sampling, and combinatorial constructions are presented. The general form in which the method of conditional probabilities is applied sequentially is described. The reason why this form does not lend itself to parallelization are discussed. The general form of the case for which the method of conditional probabilities can be applied in the parallel context is given. >

123 citations


References
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01 Jan 1985
TL;DR: This book offers a coherent treatment, at the graduate textbook level, of the field that has come to be known in the last decade or so as computational geometry.
Abstract: From the reviews: "This book offers a coherent treatment, at the graduate textbook level, of the field that has come to be known in the last decade or so as computational geometry...The book is well organized and lucidly written; a timely contribution by two founders of the field. It clearly demonstrates that computational geometry in the plane is now a fairly well-understood branch of computer science and mathematics. It also points the way to the solution of the more challenging problems in dimensions higher than two."

6,443 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: In many cases an optimum or computationally convenient test of a simple hypothesis $H_0$ against a simple alternative $H_1$ may be given in the following form. Reject $H_0$ if $S_n = \sum^n_{j=1} X_j \leqq k,$ where $X_1, X_2, \cdots, X_n$ are $n$ independent observations of a chance variable $X$ whose distribution depends on the true hypothesis and where $k$ is some appropriate number. In particular the likelihood ratio test for fixed sample size can be reduced to this form. It is shown that with each test of the above form there is associated an index $\rho$. If $\rho_1$ and $\rho_2$ are the indices corresponding to two alternative tests $e = \log \rho_1/\log \rho_2$ measures the relative efficiency of these tests in the following sense. For large samples, a sample of size $n$ with the first test will give about the same probabilities of error as a sample of size $en$ with the second test. To obtain the above result, use is made of the fact that $P(S_n \leqq na)$ behaves roughly like $m^n$ where $m$ is the minimum value assumed by the moment generating function of $X - a$. It is shown that if $H_0$ and $H_1$ specify probability distributions of $X$ which are very close to each other, one may approximate $\rho$ by assuming that $X$ is normally distributed.

3,527 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
Kenneth L. Clarkson1
06 Jan 1988
TL;DR: Asymptotically tight bounds for a combinatorial quantity of interest in discrete and computational geometry, related to halfspace partitions of point sets, are given.
Abstract: Random sampling is used for several new geometric algorithms. The algorithms are “Las Vegas,” and their expected bounds are with respect to the random behavior of the algorithms. One algorithm reports all the intersecting pairs of a set of line segments in the plane, and requires O(A + n log n) expected time, where A is the size of the answer, the number of intersecting pairs reported. The algorithm requires O(n) space in the worst case. Another algorithm computes the convex hull of a point set in E3 in O(n log A) expected time, where n is the number of points and A is the number of points on the surface of the hull. A simple Las Vegas algorithm triangulates simple polygons in O(n log log n) expected time. Algorithms for half-space range reporting are also given. In addition, this paper gives asymptotically tight bounds for a combinatorial quantity of interest in discrete and computational geometry, related to halfspace partitions of point sets.

1,138 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Richard Cole1
TL;DR: A parallel implementation of merge sort on a CREW PRAM that uses n processors and O(logn) time; the constant in the running time is small.
Abstract: We give a parallel implementation of merge sort on a CREW PRAM that uses n processors and $O(\log n)$ time; the constant in the running time is small. We also give a more complex version of the algorithm for the EREW PRAM; it also uses n processors and $O(\log n)$ time. The constant in the running time is still moderate, though not as small.

821 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work presents a practical algorithm for subdivision search that achieves the same (optimal) worst case complexity bounds as the significantly more complex algorithm of Lipton and Tarjan, namely $O(\log n)$ search time with $O(n)$ storage.
Abstract: A planar subdivision is any partition of the plane into (possibly unbounded) polygonal regions. The subdivision search problem is the following: given a subdivision $S$ with $n$ line segments and a query point $p$, determine which region of $S$ contains $p$. We present a practical algorithm for subdivision search that achieves the same (optimal) worst case complexity bounds as the significantly more complex algorithm of Lipton and Tarjan, namely $O(\log n)$ search time with $O(n)$ storage. Our subdivision search structure can be constructed in linear time from the subdivision representation used in many applications.

787 citations