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Journal ArticleDOI

Optimized constellations for two-way wireless relaying with physical network coding

01 Jun 2009-IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)-Vol. 27, Iss: 5, pp 773-787

TL;DR: The proposed modulation scheme can significantly improve end-to-end throughput for two-way relaying systems and is applicable to a relaying system using higher-level modulations of 16QAM in the MA stage.

AbstractWe investigate modulation schemes optimized for two-way wireless relaying systems, for which network coding is employed at the physical layer. We consider network coding based on denoise-and-forward (DNF) protocol, which consists of two stages: multiple access (MA) stage, where two terminals transmit simultaneously towards a relay, and broadcast (BC) stage, where the relay transmits towards the both terminals. We introduce a design principle of modulation and network coding, considering the superposed constellations during the MA stage. For the case of QPSK modulations at the MA stage, we show that QPSK constellations with an exclusive-or (XOR) network coding do not always offer the best transmission for the BC stage, and that there are several channel conditions in which unconventional 5-ary constellations lead to a better throughput performance. Through the use of sphere packing, we optimize the constellation for such an irregular network coding. We further discuss the design issue of the modulation in the case when the relay exploits diversity receptions such as multiple-antenna diversity and path diversity in frequency-selective fading. In addition, we apply our design strategy to a relaying system using higher-level modulations of 16QAM in the MA stage. Performance evaluations confirm that the proposed scheme can significantly improve end-to-end throughput for two-way relaying systems.

Topics: Linear network coding (63%), Phase-shift keying (54%), Fading (53%), Physical layer (53%), Constellation diagram (53%)

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Journal ArticleDOI

1,440 citations


Posted Content
Abstract: The concept of physical-layer network coding (PNC) was proposed in 2006 for application in wireless networks. Since then it has developed into a subfield of network coding with wide followings. The basic idea of PNC is to exploit the network coding operation that occurs naturally when electromagnetic (EM) waves are superimposed on one another. This simple idea turns out to have profound and fundamental ramifications. Subsequent works by various researchers have led to many new results in the domains of 1) wireless communication; 2) wireless information theory; and 3) wireless networking. The purpose of this paper is fourfold. First, we give a brief tutorial on the basic concept of PNC. Second, we survey and discuss recent key results in the three aforementioned areas. Third, we examine a critical issue in PNC: synchronization. It has been a common belief that PNC requires tight synchronization. Our recent results suggest, however, that PNC may actually benefit from asynchrony. Fourth, we propose that PNC is not just for wireless networks; it can also be useful in optical networks. We provide an example showing that the throughput of a passive optical network (PON) could potentially be raised by 100% with PNC.

298 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is proposed that PNC is not just for wireless networks; it can also be useful in optical networks, and an example is provided showing that the throughput of a passive optical network could potentially be raised by 100% with PNC.
Abstract: The concept of physical-layer network coding (PNC) was proposed in 2006 for application in wireless networks. Since then it has developed into a subfield of network coding with wide implications. The basic idea of PNC is to exploit the mixing of signals that occurs naturally when electromagnetic (EM) waves are superimposed on one another. In particular, at a receiver, the simultaneous transmissions by several transmitters result in the reception of a weighted sum of the signals. This weighted sum is a form of network coding operation by itself. Alternatively, the received signal could be transformed and mapped to other forms of network coding. Exploiting these facts turns out to have profound and fundamental ramifications. Subsequent works by various researchers have led to many new results in the domains of (1) wireless communication, (2) information theory, and (3) wireless networking. The purpose of this paper is fourfold. First, we give a brief tutorial on the basic concept of PNC. Second, we survey and discuss recent key results in the three aforementioned areas. Third, we examine a critical issue in PNC: synchronization. It has been a common belief that PNC requires tight synchronization. Recent results suggest, however, that PNC may actually benefit from asynchrony. Fourth, we propose that PNC is not just for wireless networks; it can also be useful in optical networks. We provide an example showing that the throughput of a passive optical network (PON) could potentially be raised by 100% with PNC.

287 citations


Posted Content
Abstract: When two or more users in a wireless network transmit simultaneously, their electromagnetic signals are linearly superimposed on the channel. As a result, a receiver that is interested in one of these signals sees the others as unwanted interference. This property of the wireless medium is typically viewed as a hindrance to reliable communication over a network. However, using a recently developed coding strategy, interference can in fact be harnessed for network coding. In a wired network, (linear) network coding refers to each intermediate node taking its received packets, computing a linear combination over a finite field, and forwarding the outcome towards the destinations. Then, given an appropriate set of linear combinations, a destination can solve for its desired packets. For certain topologies, this strategy can attain significantly higher throughputs over routing-based strategies. Reliable physical layer network coding takes this idea one step further: using judiciously chosen linear error-correcting codes, intermediate nodes in a wireless network can directly recover linear combinations of the packets from the observed noisy superpositions of transmitted signals. Starting with some simple examples, this survey explores the core ideas behind this new technique and the possibilities it offers for communication over interference-limited wireless networks.

275 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
24 Jan 2011
TL;DR: Reliable physical layer network coding takes this idea one step further: using judiciously chosen linear error-correcting codes, intermediate nodes in a wireless network can directly recover linear combinations of the packets from the observed noisy superpositions of transmitted signals.
Abstract: When two or more users in a wireless network transmit simultaneously, their electromagnetic signals are linearly superimposed on the channel. As a result, a receiver that is interested in one of these signals sees the others as unwanted interference. This property of the wireless medium is typically viewed as a hindrance to reliable communication over a network. However, using a recently developed coding strategy, interference can in fact be harnessed for network coding. In a wired network, (linear) network coding refers to each intermediate node taking its received packets, computing a linear combination over a finite field, and forwarding the outcome towards the destinations. Then, given an appropriate set of linear combinations, a destination can solve for its desired packets. For certain topologies, this strategy can attain significantly higher throughputs over routing-based strategies. Reliable physical layer network coding takes this idea one step further: using judiciously chosen linear error-correcting codes, intermediate nodes in a wireless network can directly recover linear combinations of the packets from the observed noisy superpositions of transmitted signals. Starting with some simple examples, this paper explores the core ideas behind this new technique and the possibilities it offers for communication over interference-limited wireless networks.

274 citations


References
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01 Jan 1991
TL;DR: The author examines the role of entropy, inequality, and randomness in the design of codes and the construction of codes in the rapidly changing environment.
Abstract: Preface to the Second Edition. Preface to the First Edition. Acknowledgments for the Second Edition. Acknowledgments for the First Edition. 1. Introduction and Preview. 1.1 Preview of the Book. 2. Entropy, Relative Entropy, and Mutual Information. 2.1 Entropy. 2.2 Joint Entropy and Conditional Entropy. 2.3 Relative Entropy and Mutual Information. 2.4 Relationship Between Entropy and Mutual Information. 2.5 Chain Rules for Entropy, Relative Entropy, and Mutual Information. 2.6 Jensen's Inequality and Its Consequences. 2.7 Log Sum Inequality and Its Applications. 2.8 Data-Processing Inequality. 2.9 Sufficient Statistics. 2.10 Fano's Inequality. Summary. Problems. Historical Notes. 3. Asymptotic Equipartition Property. 3.1 Asymptotic Equipartition Property Theorem. 3.2 Consequences of the AEP: Data Compression. 3.3 High-Probability Sets and the Typical Set. Summary. Problems. Historical Notes. 4. 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42,928 citations


"Optimized constellations for two-wa..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Since Shannon firstly considered a two–way channel in [10], some theoretical investigations on the bidirectional relaying have emerged so far [ 11 ]....

    [...]


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work reveals that it is in general not optimal to regard the information to be multicast as a "fluid" which can simply be routed or replicated, and by employing coding at the nodes, which the work refers to as network coding, bandwidth can in general be saved.
Abstract: We introduce a new class of problems called network information flow which is inspired by computer network applications. Consider a point-to-point communication network on which a number of information sources are to be multicast to certain sets of destinations. We assume that the information sources are mutually independent. The problem is to characterize the admissible coding rate region. This model subsumes all previously studied models along the same line. We study the problem with one information source, and we have obtained a simple characterization of the admissible coding rate region. Our result can be regarded as the max-flow min-cut theorem for network information flow. Contrary to one's intuition, our work reveals that it is in general not optimal to regard the information to be multicast as a "fluid" which can simply be routed or replicated. Rather, by employing coding at the nodes, which we refer to as network coding, bandwidth can in general be saved. This finding may have significant impact on future design of switching systems.

8,297 citations


"Optimized constellations for two-wa..." refers background in this paper

  • ...W IRELESS network coding has recently received a lot of attention in research community, although the concept of network coding has been around for almost a decade [2]....

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Book
01 Dec 1987
TL;DR: The second edition of this book continues to pursue the question: what is the most efficient way to pack a large number of equal spheres in n-dimensional Euclidean space?
Abstract: The second edition of this book continues to pursue the question: what is the most efficient way to pack a large number of equal spheres in n-dimensional Euclidean space? The authors also continue to examine related problems such as the kissing number problem, the covering problem, the quantizing problem, and the classification of lattices and quadratic forms. Like the first edition, the second edition describes the applications of these questions to other areas of mathematics and science such as number theory, coding theory, group theory, analog-to-digital conversion and data compression, n-dimensional crystallography, and dual theory and superstring theory in physics.

4,549 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results show that using COPE at the forwarding layer, without modifying routing and higher layers, increases network throughput, and the gains vary from a few percent to several folds depending on the traffic pattern, congestion level, and transport protocol.
Abstract: This paper proposes COPE, a new architecture for wireless mesh networks. In addition to forwarding packets, routers mix (i.e., code) packets from different sources to increase the information content of each transmission. We show that intelligently mixing packets increases network throughput. Our design is rooted in the theory of network coding. Prior work on network coding is mainly theoretical and focuses on multicast traffic. This paper aims to bridge theory with practice; it addresses the common case of unicast traffic, dynamic and potentially bursty flows, and practical issues facing the integration of network coding in the current network stack. We evaluate our design on a 20-node wireless network, and discuss the results of the first testbed deployment of wireless network coding. The results show that using COPE at the forwarding layer, without modifying routing and higher layers, increases network throughput. The gains vary from a few percent to several folds depending on the traffic pattern, congestion level, and transport protocol.

2,169 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
B. Rankov1, Armin Wittneben1
TL;DR: Two new half-duplex relaying protocols are proposed that avoid the pre-log factor one-half in corresponding capacity expressions and it is shown that both protocols recover a significant portion of the half- duplex loss.
Abstract: We study two-hop communication protocols where one or several relay terminals assist in the communication between two or more terminals. All terminals operate in half-duplex mode, hence the transmission of one information symbol from the source terminal to the destination terminal occupies two channel uses. This leads to a loss in spectral efficiency due to the pre-log factor one-half in corresponding capacity expressions. We propose two new half-duplex relaying protocols that avoid the pre-log factor one-half. Firstly, we consider a relaying protocol where a bidirectional connection between two terminals is established via one amplify-and-forward (AF) or decode-and-forward (DF) relay (two-way relaying). We also extend this protocol to a multi-user scenario, where multiple terminals communicate with multiple partner terminals via several orthogonalize-and-forward (OF) relay terminals, i.e., the relays orthogonalize the different two-way transmissions by a distributed zero-forcing algorithm. Secondly, we propose a relaying protocol where two relays, either AF or DF, alternately forward messages from a source terminal to a destination terminal (two-path relaying). It is shown that both protocols recover a significant portion of the half-duplex loss

1,700 citations


"Optimized constellations for two-wa..." refers background in this paper

  • ...In [6, 18 ], the amplify–and–forward (AF) bidirectional relaying is introduced, where the terminal nodes simultaneously transmit to the relaying node, and subsequently the relay broadcasts the received signal after amplification....

    [...]