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Orality and textuality in the Iranian world : patterns of interaction across the centuries

01 Jan 2015-
TL;DR: In this article, a collection of essays from scholars from various areas of Iranian and comparative studies, among which are the pre-Islamic Zoroastrian tradition with its wide network of influences in late antique Mesopotamia, notably among the Jewish milieu; classical Persian literature in its manifold genres; medieval Persian history; oral history; folklore and more.
Abstract: The volume demonstrates the cultural centrality of the oral tradition for Iranian studies. It contains contributions from scholars from various areas of Iranian and comparative studies, among which are the pre-Islamic Zoroastrian tradition with its wide network of influences in late antique Mesopotamia, notably among the Jewish milieu; classical Persian literature in its manifold genres; medieval Persian history; oral history; folklore and more. The essays in this collection embrace both the pre-Islamic and Islamic periods, both verbal and visual media, as well as various language communities (Middle Persian, Persian, Tajik, Dari) and geographical spaces (Greater Iran in pre-Islamic and Islamic medieval periods; Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan of modern times). Taken as a whole, the essays reveal the unique blending of oral and literate poetics in the texts or visual artefacts each author focuses upon, conceptualizing their interrelationship and function.
Citations
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Book
01 Jan 1981

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Yamamoto and Yamamoto discuss how oral tradition inter-connects with Middle Eastern literature and present a Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures (BSIL).
Abstract: KUMIKO YAMAMOTO Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures, 26. Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2003. xxiv + 191 pp. ISBN 90 04 12587 6 The central argument of this book concerns how oral tradition intera...

16 citations

Book Chapter
01 Jan 2012
TL;DR: Minchin this article discusses the audience expectation of Penelope and Odysseus in Homer's Odyssey, and the role of the audience in the performance of poetry in performance in early philosophical texts.
Abstract: Contents Preface Notes on Contributors Introduction Elizabeth Minchin Part I Poetry in Performance Chapter 1 The Audience Expects: Penelope and Odysseus Adrian Kelly Chapter 2 The Presentation of Song in Homer's Odyssey Deborah Beck Chapter 3 Comparative Perspectives on the Composition of the Homeric Simile Jonathon Ready Chapter 4 Composing Lines, Performing Acts: Clauses, Discourse Acts, and Melodic Units in a South Slavic Epic Song Anna Bonifazi and David F. Elmer Chapter 5 Works and Days as Performance Ruth Scodel Part II Literacy and Orality Chapter 6 Empowering the Sacred: The Function of the Sanskrit Text in a Contemporary Exposition of the Bhagavatapurana McComas Taylor Chapter 7 Prompts for Participation in Early Philosophical Texts James Henderson Collins II Chapter 8 Performing an Academic Talk: Proclus on Hesiod's Works and Days Patrizia Marzillo Chapter 9 The Criticism--and the Practice--of Literacy in the Ancient Philosophical Tradition Mathilde Cambron-Goulet Chapter 10 Reading Books, Talking Culture: The Performance of Paideia in Imperial Greek Literature Jeroen Lauwers Chapter 11 Eumolpus Poeta at Work: Rehearsed Spontaneity in the Satyricon Niall Slater

14 citations

Book ChapterDOI
04 Dec 2009

4 citations

References
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Book
30 Nov 1967
TL;DR: A brief survey of the sources for medieval knowledge of Alexander the Great and of their principal medieval derivatives can be found in this paper, with a focus on the relation between the primary sources of medieval knowledge and the principal medieval derivative of psuedocallisthenes.
Abstract: Illustrations Authors Acknowledgements Abbreviations General Introduction Part I. A Brief Survey of the Sources for Medieval Knowledge of Alexander the Great and of their Principal Medieval Derivatives: 1. The primary sources of medieval knowledge of Alexander the Great 2. The principal medieval derivatives of psuedocallisthenes 3. The principal medieval texts derived from historical sources 4. The principal Latin chronicle accounts of Alexander Part II. The Medieval Conception of Alexander the Great: Introduction 1. The conception of Alexander in moralists to the fourteenth century, with a prospect of the opinion of later writers 2. The conception of Alexander in theologians and mystics 3. The conception of Alexander in the books of 'exempla' and in preachers 4. The conception of Alexander in secular writers to the fourteenth century, with a prospect of the opinion of later writers 5. The late medieval conception of Alexander in England, France and Germany 6. The conception of Alexander in late medieval and renaissance Italy 7. Summary conclusion Notes Appendices Bibliography Index.

100 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1997-Arabica
TL;DR: In the first half of the 6th century, the Hanbalite scholar Abui 'l-Farag ibn al-Gawzl (d. 597) wrote a book to encourage his lazy contemporaries to greater efforts in the memorisation of Tradition as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: ? 1 In the sixth century of the Muslim era the Hanbalite scholar Abui 'l-Farag ibn al-Gawzl (d. 597) wrote a book to encourage his lazy contemporaries to greater efforts in the memorisation of Tradition.' God, he argued, had singled out the Muslims to memorise Koran and Tradition, whereas those who had been before them had been dependent on written sources and were incapable of memorisation. The Jews, for example, had conferred on Ezra2 the title "son of God" merely because he knew the Torah by heart; among Muslims, by contrast, a seven-year-old child could recite the Koran from memory. The same contrast obtained in the field of Tradition. "Nobody among the nations transmits the words and deeds of their Prophet in a reliable fashion apart from us; for among us Tradition is transmitted from one generation to another, and the reliability of [each] transmitter is examined until the tradition has been traced back to the Prophet. Other nations have their traditions from written sources of which the writers and transmitters are unknown."3 ? 2 Ibn al-Oawzi's exhortation suggests two basic points about the "oral Tradition" of Islam. The first concerns the significance of its oral character. For Ibn al-(awzi, as for the Muslim traditionists in general, this oral character was more than an occasion for the display of

99 citations

Book
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In this paper, the use and function of writing in early Islam is discussed, and who is the Author of the Kitab Al-'Ayn is identified as one of the authors.
Abstract: Editor's Introduction 1. The Transmission of the Science in Early Islam: Oral or Written? 2. The Transmission of the Sciences in Early Islam Revisited 3. Writing and Publishing: On the Use and Function of Writing in Early Islam 4. Oral Poetry Theory and Arabic Literature 5. Oral Torah and Hadit: Transmission, Prohibition of Writing, Redaction 6. Who is the Author of the Kitab Al-'Ayn

60 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Greek Alexander Myth as discussed by the authors depicts the life and adventures of one of history's greatest heroes - taming the horse Bucephalus, meeting the Amazons and his quest to defeat the King of Persia.
Abstract: Mystery surrounds the parentage of Alexander, the prince born to Queen Olympias. Is his father Philip, King of Macedonia, or Nectanebo, the mysterious sorcerer who seduced the queen by trickery? One thing is certain: the boy is destined to conquer the known world. He grows up to fulfil this prophecy, building a mighty empire that spans from Greece and Italy to Africa and Asia. Begun soon after the real Alexander's death and expanded in the centuries that followed, "The Greek Alexander Myth" depicts the life and adventures of one of history's greatest heroes - taming the horse Bucephalus, meeting the Amazons and his quest to defeat the King of Persia. Including such elements of fantasy as Alexander's ascent to heaven borne by eagles, this literary masterpiece brilliantly evokes a lost age of heroism.

49 citations