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Book ChapterDOI

Paradoxes of Pastiche: Spike Jonze, Hype Williams, and the Race of the Postmodern Auteur

05 Sep 2007-
About: The article was published on 2007-09-05. It has received 8 citations till now.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Wiley and Gispert as discussed by the authors used representational strategies of hip-hop to refashion art history, bringing the painterly techniques that created optical illusion in late Renaissance and Baroque painting especially to the surface in their work.
Abstract: Contemporary visual expressions of hip-hop have popularized approaches to visibility among black youth. These practices emphasize the effect of being seen and being represented, especially the optical effects of light and shiny reflection. Studio artists Kehinde Wiley and Luis Gispert draw on these representational strategies of hip-hop to refashion art history, bringing the painterly techniques that created optical illusion in late Renaissance and Baroque painting especially to the surface in their work. They also use hip-hop's visual language to highlight the surface aesthetics of race, the hypervisibility of blackness in contemporary consumer culture, and the blinding limits of visuality.

46 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Fincher as discussed by the authors described music video as the most terrific sandbox, where "you could try anything" and "music video was the most wonderful sandbox where I could try almost anything".
Abstract: “Music video was the most terrific sandbox, where I could try anything.” 1 David Fincher David Fincher, personal interview, October 1998. Lawrence's and Meyers's videos can be seen on the web. A li...

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a conceptual approach based on looking at music video in terms of its production of space is proposed, where the authors focus on what Michel Chion describes as a very influential new audiovisual form, the music video, which has opened the doors to infinite possibilities in representing relations between a voice and its source.
Abstract: Music, as Jacques Attali emphasises, “is a way of perceiving the world” (1985:4). Sarah Cohen also suggests that: “Individuals can use music as a cultural ‘map of meaning’, drawing upon it to locate themselves in different imaginary geographies… and to articulate both individual and collective identities” (1998: 286-287). Tia DeNora extends on this, pointing out that: “Music can be used as a device for the reflexive process of remembering/constructing who one is, a technology for spinning the apparently continuous tale of who one is” (DeNora 2000: 63). Music has served various integral social and cultural functions in human societies throughout history. It seems clear that as music has changed shape and form through the advent of various reproduction technologies, the ways in which we consume as well as produce music, and the shape and form of music-as-cultural map and music as way of perceiving the world, have also changed over time. In his book The Sight of Sound, Richard Leppert points out: “Precisely because musical sound is abstract, intangible, and ethereal – lost as soon as it is gained – the visual experience of its production is crucial… for locating and communicating the place of music and musical sound within society and culture” (1993: xx-xxi). This paper will focus on what Michel Chion describes as “a very influential new audiovisual form, the music video, which has opened the doors to infinite possibilities in representing relations between a voice and its source” (1999: 172). The paper argues that the contemporary articulation of music and images, built on “infinite possibilities in representing relations between a voice and its source”, has come to shape a persuasive new audiovisual modality for “locating and communicating the place of music and musical sound within society and culture”. In order to examine this new audiovisual modality, I will move away from a conventional approach based upon looking at music video in terms of its non-narrative structure, and instead propose a conceptual approach based on looking at music video in terms of its production of space. This line of discussion will be navigated not by providing close textual readings of various music videos, but rather by examining and theorising the music video as cultural/media form.

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argued that the contemporary US musician Hayley Kiyoko can be seen as a queer music video auteur who has transformed what the "gaze" means in pop music videos.
Abstract: This paper examines the queer gaze within pop music videos. It contends that the contemporary US musician Hayley Kiyoko can be seen as a queer music video auteur who has transformed what the ‘gaze’...

2 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Michel Gondry's 2002 video for the Chemical Brothers' song Star Guitar is a deceptively simple piece of musical visualization as discussed by the authors, which can be read as initiating a dialogue with cinematic history without resorting to blatant pastiche.
Abstract: Michel Gondry’s 2002 video for the Chemical Brothers’ song Star Guitar is a deceptively simple piece of musical visualization.1 What begins as a seemingly mundane train ride through France quickly reveals itself to be a complex interweaving of music, image, and image-as-musical-notation. The impact of the video extends beyond even this intricate choreography, however, to permit the music video format to develop a sophisticated commentary on film history and theory, compressing a century of discourse into a four-minute visual engagement with film’s originary images and conceptual underpinnings. Although music video is ontologically distinct from film, and the impetus for its production and promotion involves different priorities from those of a long-format film (not least of which is a commercial pitch for the song and artists featured in the video), Gondry’s video can nonetheless be read as initiating a dialogue with cinematic history without resorting to blatant pastiche.2 Employing the device of the “track,” I will discuss several elements in the video: the indexical complications shared by sound tracks and digital image tracks, Star Guitar’s use of train imagery as a nod to the development of filmic time and space, the song’s sound as an aural image, and the play with Sergei Eisenstein’s writings on pathos and musical montage, which implicate the viewer in the production of the piece.3 Star Guitar is the second track from the Chemical Brothers’ album Come With Us. The track, a term originally indicating the recording of sound incised onto wax cylinders (and later denoted on records and compact discs), is the indexical trace of sound on a physical object.4 As Stanley Cavell remarks in The World Viewed, though made available in different ways, recorded sound is ontologically identical to sound heard live, since it is always mediated by the thing producing it:

1 citations

References
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MonographDOI
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: Ang as mentioned in this paper argues that it is possible to study audience pleasures and popular television in a way that is not naively populist and examines how the makers and marketers of television attempt to mould their audience and looks at the often unexpected ways in which the viewers actively engage with the programmes they watch Living Room Wars highlights the inherent contradictions of a 'politics of pleasure' of television consumption.
Abstract: Living Room Wars brings together Ien Ang's recent writings on television audiences, and , in response to recent criticisms of cultural studies, argues that it is possible to study audience pleasures and popular television in a way that is not naively populist Ang examines how the makers and marketers of television attempt to mould their audience and looks at the often unexpected ways in which the viewers actively engage with the programmes they watch Living Room Wars highlights the inherent contradictions of a 'politics of pleasure' of television consumption: Ang moves beyond the trditional forcus on textual meanings to explore the structural and historical representations fo television audiences as an integral part of modern culture Her wide-ranging and illuminating discussion takes in the battle between television and its audiences; the politics of empirical audience research; new technologies and the tactics of television consumption; ethnography and radical contextualism in audience studies; television fiction and women's fantasy; feminist desire and female pleasure in media consumption, and the transnational media system

867 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1982
TL;DR: In this article, the notion of discourse is defined as a notion of limits, and the overall discourse relation is regarded as a limiting function, one that establishes a bounded arena of shared expectations as to meaning.
Abstract: The meaning of a photograph, like that of any other entity, is inevitably subject to cultural definition. The task here is to define and engage critically something we might call the ‘photographic discourse’. A discourse can be defined as an arena of information exchange, that is, as a system of relations between parties engaged in communicative activity. In a very important sense the notion of discourse is a notion of limits. That is, the overall discourse relation could be regarded as a limiting function, one that establishes a bounded arena of shared expectations as to meaning. It is this limiting function that determines the very possibility of meaning. To raise the issue of limits, of the closure affected from within any given discourse situation, is to situate oneself outside, in a fundamentally metacritical relation, to the criticism sanctioned by the logic of the discourse.

284 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 1976-Language
TL;DR: In the lexical field of English adjectives referring to sensory experience, there has been a continuing semantic change so regular, so enduring, and so inclusive that its description may be the strongest generalization in diachronic semantics reported for English or any other language.
Abstract: The century-old failure of historical linguistics to discover regularities of semantic change comparable to those in phonological change, as described by Grassmann or Grimm, has forced us to entertain as 'semantic laws' proposals that express mere tendencies, or are so restricted to a particular time, language, or narrow inventory, that the 'law' is indistinguishable from a description of a discrete historical event. But in the lexical field of English adjectives referring to sensory experience, there has been a continuing semantic change so regular, so enduring, and so inclusive that its description may be the strongest generalization in diachronic semantics reported for English or any other language. On the basis of very similar evidence from IndoEuropean cognates and from Japanese, the possibility exists that the regularity described here might characterize more than just these languages. It qualifies as a testable hypothesis in regard to future semantic change in any language.*

244 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The spectacular burgeoning of music videos poses many intriguing questions about the form and its institutional setting, as well as the relations between video and dreaming as discussed by the authors, and the relationship between music videos and dreaming.
Abstract: The spectacular burgeoning of music videos poses many intriguing questions about the form and its institutional setting, as well as the relations between video and dreaming.

97 citations