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Peer Reviewed Title: Language Education, Race, and the Remaking of American Citizenship in Los Angeles, 1900-1968 Author:

01 Jan 2013-
About: The article was published on 2013-01-01 and is currently open access. It has received 8 citations till now. The article focuses on the topics: Citizenship & Language education.
Citations
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Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the authors express the solidarity they still feel with those who fled to the far side of the world and who will never see them again by sending their greetings.
Abstract: Letters bring the low voices across the sea. The unfa miliar pens grope for the proper words. When you ask somebody to write for you, you must go and treat him. Therefore you try yourself. In the store are printed forms. Sometimes they will do to transmit information. But you wish through this lifeless paper to do more than send news. With painful effort and at the sacrifice of precious time, you express the solidarity you still feel with those who stayed behind. The sheet is then the symbol of the ties that continue to bind. Ceremonial salutations, to my dearest ... to every him and her who filled the days of the old life and whom I will never see again. By this letter I kiss you. To the aged parents who bred and nurtured, who took trouble over, shed tears for me and now have none to comfort them; to the brother who shared my tasks and bed; to my comrades of the fields; to all the kin who joined in festivals; to the whole visible communion, the oneness, of the village that I have forfeited by emigration; to each I send my greetings. And with my greetings go wishes that you may have the sweet years of life, of health and happi ness, alas elusive there and here. They are wanderers to the wide world and often yearn to ward the far direction whence they have come. Why even the birds who fly away from their native places still hasten to go back. Can ever a man feel really happy condemned to live away from where he was born? Though by leaving he has cut himself off and knows he never will return, yet he hopes, by reaching backward, still to belong in the homeland. It is to that end that the husband and wife and older chil dren gather to assist in the composition; it is to that end that they assemble to read the reply. Little enough occurs to them that is worth recording, certainly not the monotonous struggle

271 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Workers make a New Deal as discussed by the authors, becoming a union rank and file, encountering mass culture and competing loyalty at the workplace, and finding common ground in workers' common ground Conclusion.
Abstract: Preface Introduction 1. Living and working in Chicago in 1919 2. Ethnicity in the New Era 3. Encountering mass culture 4. Contested loyalty at the workplace 5. Adrift in the Great Depression 6. Workers make a New Deal 7. Becoming a union rank and file 8. Workers' common ground Conclusion.

31 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 1983
TL;DR: In this paper, Anderson examines the creation and global spread of the 'imagined communities' of nationality and explores the processes that created these communities: the territorialisation of religious faiths, the decline of antique kingship, the interaction between capitalism and print, the development of vernacular languages-of-state, and changing conceptions of time.
Abstract: What makes people love and die for nations, as well as hate and kill in their name? While many studies have been written on nationalist political movements, the sense of nationality - the personal and cultural feeling of belonging to the nation - has not received proportionate attention. In this widely acclaimed work, Benedict Anderson examines the creation and global spread of the 'imagined communities' of nationality. Anderson explores the processes that created these communities: the territorialisation of religious faiths, the decline of antique kingship, the interaction between capitalism and print, the development of vernacular languages-of-state, and changing conceptions of time. He shows how an originary nationalism born in the Americas was modularly adopted by popular movements in Europe, by the imperialist powers, and by the anti-imperialist resistances in Asia and Africa. This revised edition includes two new chapters, one of which discusses the complex role of the colonialist state's mindset in the development of Third World nationalism, while the other analyses the processes by which all over the world, nations came to imagine themselves as old.

25,018 citations

Book
29 Apr 1983
TL;DR: This article explored examples of this process of invention -the creation of Welsh Scottish national culture, the elaboration of British royal rituals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the origins of imperial ritual in British India and Africa, and the attempts by radical movements to develop counter-traditions of their own.
Abstract: Many of the traditions which we think of as very ancient in their origins were not in fact sanctioned by long usage over the centuries, but were invented comparative recently. This book explores examples of this process of invention - the creation of Welsh Scottish 'national culture'; the elaboration of British royal rituals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the origins of imperial ritual in British India and Africa; and the attempts by radical movements to develop counter-traditions of their own. This book addresses the complex interaction of past and present, bringing together historicans and anthropologists in a fascinating study of ritual and symbolism which possess new questions for the understanding of our history.

7,291 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a history of social remittances and the stages of the life cycle of domestic politics in the context of transnationalizing community development, and make values from two worlds fit.
Abstract: Acknowledgments Introduction PART ONE 1. The Historical Context 2. Social Remittances PART TWO 3. Reshaping the Stages of the Life Cycle 4. Making Values from Two Worlds Fit PART THREE 5. When Domestic Politics Becomes Transnational 6. "God Is Everywhere": Religious Life Across Borders 7. Transnationalizing Community Development Conclusion Appendix: Methodology Notes Bibliography Index

1,648 citations

Book
31 May 1998
TL;DR: In "City of Quartz" as mentioned in this paper, Davis reconstructs LA's shadow history and dissects its ethereal economy, giving us a city of Dickensian extremes, Pynchonesque conspiracies, and a desperation straight out of Nathaniel West.
Abstract: No metropolis has been more loved or more hated. To its official boosters, "Los Angeles brings it all together." To detractors, LA is a sunlit mortuary where "you can rot without feeling it." To Mike Davis, the author of this fiercely elegant and wide-ranging work of social history, Los Angeles is both utopia and dystopia, a place where the last Joshua trees are being plowed under to make room for model communities in the desert, where the rich have hired their own police to fend off street gangs, as well as armed Beirut militias. In "City of Quartz", Davis reconstructs LA's shadow history and dissects its ethereal economy. He tells us who has the power and how they hold on to it. He gives us a city of Dickensian extremes, Pynchonesque conspiracies, and a desperation straight out of Nathaniel West-a city in which we may glimpse our own future, mirrored with terrifying clarity. In this special 15-year anniversary edition, Davis provides a dazzling update on the city's current status.

1,613 citations

DOI
28 Apr 2023
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors present a history of social remittances and the stages of the life cycle of domestic politics in the context of transnationalizing community development, and make values from two worlds fit.
Abstract: Acknowledgments Introduction PART ONE 1. The Historical Context 2. Social Remittances PART TWO 3. Reshaping the Stages of the Life Cycle 4. Making Values from Two Worlds Fit PART THREE 5. When Domestic Politics Becomes Transnational 6. "God Is Everywhere": Religious Life Across Borders 7. Transnationalizing Community Development Conclusion Appendix: Methodology Notes Bibliography Index

1,571 citations